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(Discovery)   Ever wondered why octopuses don't tie themselves in knots?   (news.discovery.com) divider line 80
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3230 clicks; posted to Geek » on 15 May 2014 at 2:24 PM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-05-15 12:42:08 PM  
Octopi
 
2014-05-15 12:45:57 PM  
No. I have never wondered about that.
 
2014-05-15 01:16:39 PM  

Sin_City_Superhero: No. I have never wondered about that.


I have wondered though why the coral snake doesn't dance the watusi.
 
2014-05-15 01:16:47 PM  
From TFA:

We humans don't have such problems because our rigid skeletons limit the number of possibilities as to where our arms and legs could be.

Oh I don't know (PNSFW)
 
2014-05-15 01:24:11 PM  
I'm going to go with "because they don't want to."
 
2014-05-15 01:25:12 PM  
The discovery, published in the latest issue of Current Biology, is helping researchers to design soft robots, such as for surgical use, that can reshape their bodies without becoming a jumbled mess.

Screw surgical equipment. I want fishing line, rope, extension cords and hoses that can do this. I'm a bit of a tangler.
 
2014-05-15 01:28:59 PM  

Crewmannumber6: Octopi


Octopods
 
2014-05-15 01:29:22 PM  
Because the forgot the safe word.
 
2014-05-15 01:31:13 PM  
Because with eight puses, they've got better things to do.
 
2014-05-15 01:32:31 PM  
Because they have common Michael Hutchsence.
 
2014-05-15 01:35:17 PM  
They do, but the Ortega really makes their tako pop.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2014-05-15 01:41:51 PM  

Crewmannumber6: Octopi


So how are things going in ancient Rome these days?
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2014-05-15 01:47:47 PM  
Maybe for the same reason I don't tie my schlong into a knot?  It has infinite degrees of freedom too until I grab it and try to manipulate it into a knot.

Then it just pops out straight all by itself.
 
2014-05-15 01:50:13 PM  
No, but looking at that picture makes me wonder how long an octopus's tongue would have to be, if it wanted to lick it's own balls.
 
2014-05-15 01:50:37 PM  

vpb: Crewmannumber6: Octopi

So how are things going in ancient Rome these days?


Not bad. A little warm, we could use some rain.
 
2014-05-15 02:28:54 PM  

vernonFL: Crewmannumber6: Octopi

Octopods


Octopodes
 
2014-05-15 02:29:03 PM  
Because they don't want to?
 
2014-05-15 02:39:16 PM  

Delta1212: vernonFL: Crewmannumber6: Octopi

Octopods

Octopodes


more like, octopedos! if you know what i mean!

/ i mean tentacle porn.
 
2014-05-15 02:41:11 PM  
"We were surprised that nobody before us had noticed this very robust and easy-to-detect phenomena," co-author Guy Levy of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, said in a press release. "We were entirely surprised by the brilliant and simple solution of the octopus to this potentially very complicated problem."

/While bored at a long meeting recently, I counted the numbers of times the word robust was used and we were averaging one "robust" every 18 minutes. That word needs to be stopped!
 
2014-05-15 02:48:32 PM  
blog.aquanerd.com
 
2014-05-15 02:49:13 PM  
Because they are smart enough not to?
 
2014-05-15 02:53:21 PM  
Because they don't drink?

/it's octopidians
 
2014-05-15 02:55:16 PM  
They're too busy with their garden.

- AAAAAACHTAPUTTTTTTTHY would have been a much better Bond villianess  with Sean Connery saying it.
 
2014-05-15 03:05:58 PM  
Ever wondered why octopuses don't tie themselves in knots?

memeorama.com
 
2014-05-15 03:14:57 PM  

Delta1212: vernonFL: Crewmannumber6: Octopi

Octopods

Octopodes

"Octopuses" is actually the correct plural when referring to multiple individuals. Multiple species would be referred to as "octopoda." "Octopodes" is also "the best kind of correct," albeit archaic. "Octopi" is a word used only by ignorant people trying to sound edjumacated, who don't know the difference between Latin and Greek, and even if the word were Latin instead of Greek (which it is not) would still be doing it wrong since it'd be third declension (thus "octopedes"), not second.
 
2014-05-15 03:22:17 PM  

COMALite J: "Octopuses" is actually the correct plural when referring to multiple individuals. Multiple species would be referred to as "octopoda." "Octopodes" is also "the best kind of correct," albeit archaic. "Octopi" is a word used only by ignorant people trying to sound edjumacated, who don't know the difference between Latin and Greek, and even if the word were Latin instead of Greek (which it is not) would still be doing it wrong since it'd be third declension (thus "octopedes"), not second.



Mommy, what is 'nerdrage'?
 
2014-05-15 03:22:37 PM  
Octopi? What the hell drugs are some people on?

So someone constructs a word for an animal based on the greek "octa" (eight) "pus" (legs), fair enough. Later some other burk decides it is appropriate to borrow (kind of) pluralization rules for (some) words ending in -us from Latin converting to -i, because octopuses is just too obvious and easily worked out by most English speakers.


Is the intent to try and turn English into the most complex, least useful language in the universe by needing to know the etymology of every word, plus having to know random historical weirdness like the above, and/or have to learn the usages of every word by rote, due to minimizing the amount of consistency of grammatical rules across the language.
 
2014-05-15 03:23:33 PM  

COMALite J: Delta1212: vernonFL: Crewmannumber6: Octopi

Octopods

Octopodes
"Octopuses" is actually the correct plural when referring to multiple individuals. Multiple species would be referred to as "octopoda." "Octopodes" is also "the best kind of correct," albeit archaic. "Octopi" is a word used only by ignorant people trying to sound edjumacated, who don't know the difference between Latin and Greek, and even if the word were Latin instead of Greek (which it is not) would still be doing it wrong since it'd be third declension (thus "octopedes"), not second.


For you:

le-mot-juste-en-anglais.typepad.com
 
2014-05-15 03:24:50 PM  

Tobin_Lam: Because they are smart enough not to?


I was going to say "because they're not f*cking retarded". But that works too.
 
2014-05-15 03:25:26 PM  

kbronsito: "We were surprised that nobody before us had noticed this very robust and easy-to-detect phenomena," co-author Guy Levy of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, said in a press release. "We were entirely surprised by the brilliant and simple solution of the octopus to this potentially very complicated problem."

/While bored at a long meeting recently, I counted the numbers of times the word robust was used and we were averaging one "robust" every 18 minutes. That word needs to be stopped!


Our new corporate word is "compelling."  Everything is compelling; yet, I am surprisingly bored.
 
2014-05-15 03:27:22 PM  

plcow: kbronsito: "We were surprised that nobody before us had noticed this very robust and easy-to-detect phenomena," co-author Guy Levy of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, said in a press release. "We were entirely surprised by the brilliant and simple solution of the octopus to this potentially very complicated problem."

/While bored at a long meeting recently, I counted the numbers of times the word robust was used and we were averaging one "robust" every 18 minutes. That word needs to be stopped!

Our new corporate word is "compelling."  Everything is compelling; yet, I am surprisingly bored.


Things are currently very "exciting" around here.
 
2014-05-15 03:27:56 PM  
because Octopuses are cool.
 
2014-05-15 03:28:33 PM  

xria: Octopi? What the hell drugs are some people on?

So someone constructs a word for an animal based on the greek "octa" (eight) "pus" (legs), fair enough. Later some other burk decides it is appropriate to borrow (kind of) pluralization rules for (some) words ending in -us from Latin converting to -i, because octopuses is just too obvious and easily worked out by most English speakers.


Is the intent to try and turn English into the most complex, least useful language in the universe by needing to know the etymology of every word, plus having to know random historical weirdness like the above, and/or have to learn the usages of every word by rote, due to minimizing the amount of consistency of grammatical rules across the language.


These'd be the same burks that would "correct" you by saying you should have said, "On what the hell drugs are some people?" or some shiat because "sentences shouldn't end in a preposition." Once again, more pseudo-Latin stupidity.
 
2014-05-15 03:29:54 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: COMALite J: Delta1212: vernonFL: Crewmannumber6: Octopi

Octopods

Octopodes
"Octopuses" is actually the correct plural when referring to multiple individuals. Multiple species would be referred to as "octopoda." "Octopodes" is also "the best kind of correct," albeit archaic. "Octopi" is a word used only by ignorant people trying to sound edjumacated, who don't know the difference between Latin and Greek, and even if the word were Latin instead of Greek (which it is not) would still be doing it wrong since it'd be third declension (thus "octopedes"), not second.

For you:

[le-mot-juste-en-anglais.typepad.com image 424x191]


Polyphilia sounds like a good girls name.
 
2014-05-15 03:39:41 PM  
FTA:  "It also solves a mystery about octopuses, whose brains appear to be are unaware of what their two legs and six arms are doing."

mcgrewsecurity.com
 
2014-05-15 03:39:46 PM  

PanicMan: Tobin_Lam: Because they are smart enough not to?

I was going to say "because they're not f*cking retarded". But that works too.


Yours is good, too.
 
2014-05-15 03:48:33 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: xria: Octopi? What the hell drugs are some people on?

So someone constructs a word for an animal based on the greek "octa" (eight) "pus" (legs), fair enough. Later some other burk decides it is appropriate to borrow (kind of) pluralization rules for (some) words ending in -us from Latin converting to -i, because octopuses is just too obvious and easily worked out by most English speakers.


Is the intent to try and turn English into the most complex, least useful language in the universe by needing to know the etymology of every word, plus having to know random historical weirdness like the above, and/or have to learn the usages of every word by rote, due to minimizing the amount of consistency of grammatical rules across the language.

These'd be the same burks that would "correct" you by saying you should have said, "On what the hell drugs are some people?" or some shiat because "sentences shouldn't end in a preposition." Once again, more pseudo-Latin stupidity.


or the cajun method:

- hey man, where the library at?

- you can't end a sentence with a preposition...

- ok... hey man, where the library at, asshole!

/ but you're wrong.  it would be a very different group of burks.  those who like history would study english's prior forms and realize that ending sentences in prepositions is not only allowed, but very frequent.  see anything from the middle or old english periods.  (pre 1500s, the difference between middle and old would be william the bastard, i guess).  all the latinate BS was installed by people who wished the vulgar english would be more "logical" like pretty latin.  so, they ignored history to create many of our modern "rules".  basically, all of those arbitrary rules, those with no historical pedigree or linguistic purpose, merely stylistic.  the only reason they thought it was more "logical" was because they did not understand english at all.  all of those "irregularities" in english are the product of very specific rules.  but, english used to have a morphological syntax, not a word order syntax.  those fools who wanted to apply latin to english merely failed to understand that english already solved it's own problems.  it didn't need any help.
 
2014-05-15 03:49:31 PM  

Delta1212: plcow: kbronsito: "We were surprised that nobody before us had noticed this very robust and easy-to-detect phenomena," co-author Guy Levy of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, said in a press release. "We were entirely surprised by the brilliant and simple solution of the octopus to this potentially very complicated problem."

/While bored at a long meeting recently, I counted the numbers of times the word robust was used and we were averaging one "robust" every 18 minutes. That word needs to be stopped!

Our new corporate word is "compelling."  Everything is compelling; yet, I am surprisingly bored.

Things are currently very "exciting" around here.


our CEO busted out "synergy" the other day.  I was stoked, he was full on corporate-speak.  Oh, and robustness is a thing we test for at my work, that damn word is around constantly.
 
2014-05-15 03:49:39 PM  

Ego edo infantia cattus: FTA:  "It also solves a mystery about octopuses, whose brains appear to be are unaware of what their two legs and six arms are doing."

[mcgrewsecurity.com image 255x191]


Link.
 
2014-05-15 03:50:40 PM  
More importantly, do they touch themselves with their suckers? Because i'm not going to lie, I probably would too.
 
2014-05-15 03:52:12 PM  

Ego edo infantia cattus: FTA:  "It also solves a mystery about octopuses, whose brains appear to be are unaware of what their two legs and six arms are doing."

[mcgrewsecurity.com image 255x191]


The common conception of octopusesiodesedes is that they have 8 "arms", which implies they're all used for the same purposes.

They've found that 2 of an octopus's arms are used for locomotion, so it's closer to accurate (the best kind) to say 2 + 6.
 
2014-05-15 04:07:37 PM  

Crewmannumber6: Octopi


Octupi the seafloor!
 
2014-05-15 04:08:45 PM  

Seat's Taken: Delta1212: plcow: kbronsito: "We were surprised that nobody before us had noticed this very robust and easy-to-detect phenomena," co-author Guy Levy of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, said in a press release. "We were entirely surprised by the brilliant and simple solution of the octopus to this potentially very complicated problem."

/While bored at a long meeting recently, I counted the numbers of times the word robust was used and we were averaging one "robust" every 18 minutes. That word needs to be stopped!

Our new corporate word is "compelling."  Everything is compelling; yet, I am surprisingly bored.

Things are currently very "exciting" around here.

our CEO busted out "synergy" the other day.  I was stoked, he was full on corporate-speak.  Oh, and robustness is a thing we test for at my work, that damn word is around constantly.


Robust just means you're convinced the possible failure points have been covered.
 
2014-05-15 04:08:56 PM  

Sin_City_Superhero: No. I have never wondered about that.


First time the subject has ever come up and it's a stupid question.
 
2014-05-15 04:15:50 PM  

Dr Dreidel: Ego edo infantia cattus: FTA:  "It also solves a mystery about octopuses, whose brains appear to be are unaware of what their two legs and six arms are doing."

[mcgrewsecurity.com image 255x191]

The common conception of octopusesiodesedes is that they have 8 "arms", which implies they're all used for the same purposes.

They've found that 2 of an octopus's arms are used for locomotion, so it's closer to accurate (the best kind) to say 2 + 6.


Wait, so you're telling that, when something wants to move forward, it pushes off with its rear-most appendages, thus leaving its front-most appendages free for manipulating objects?

Stunned, I am.

/limited study
/they can still be called 'arms'
/now, if you had pointed out that octopussies do not have tentacles...
 
2014-05-15 04:18:00 PM  
Octopus have 2 legs and 6 arms? I did know that.
 
2014-05-15 04:28:43 PM  

kbronsito: "We were surprised that nobody before us had noticed this very robust and easy-to-detect phenomena," co-author Guy Levy of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, said in a press release. "We were entirely surprised by the brilliant and simple solution of the octopus to this potentially very complicated problem."

/While bored at a long meeting recently, I counted the numbers of times the word robust was used and we were averaging one "robust" every 18 minutes. That word needs to be stopped!


Or used properly, where it actually means something intelligible.
 
2014-05-15 04:37:10 PM  

elbows_deep_silent_queef: kbronsito: "We were surprised that nobody before us had noticed this very robust and easy-to-detect phenomena," co-author Guy Levy of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, said in a press release. "We were entirely surprised by the brilliant and simple solution of the octopus to this potentially very complicated problem."

/While bored at a long meeting recently, I counted the numbers of times the word robust was used and we were averaging one "robust" every 18 minutes. That word needs to be stopped!

Or used properly, where it actually means something intelligible.


Yeah. Right after I posted, I started thinking that it didn't even make sense in this sentence.
 
2014-05-15 04:43:02 PM  
Octopi Wall Street!
 
2014-05-15 04:53:46 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: Dr Dreidel: Ego edo infantia cattus: FTA:  "It also solves a mystery about octopuses, whose brains appear to be are unaware of what their two legs and six arms are doing."

[mcgrewsecurity.com image 255x191]

The common conception of octopusesiodesedes is that they have 8 "arms", which implies they're all used for the same purposes.

They've found that 2 of an octopus's arms are used for locomotion, so it's closer to accurate (the best kind) to say 2 + 6.

Wait, so you're telling that, when something wants to move forward, it pushes off with its rear-most appendages, thus leaving its front-most appendages free for manipulating objects?

Stunned, I am.

/limited study
/they can still be called 'arms'
/now, if you had pointed out that octopussies do not have tentacles...


Exactly.
I wikied it before posting just to make sure I wasn't going crazy. All eight arms are in fact, called arms. I guess some scientists just like to call them legs because they're primarily used for movement, even though they're atomically identical to the other limbs. Hence the "Dude, what?" cat.
 
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