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(WebMD)   Here is another headline about a study that is debunked in the article at a record pace of the second sentence   (webmd.com) divider line 4
    More: Fail, Disease Control  
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10301 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 May 2014 at 10:47 PM (18 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-05-13 10:51:03 PM
4 votes:
I don't think "debunked" means what you think it means, smits.
2014-05-13 10:49:19 PM
3 votes:
Fail tag for subby.
2014-05-13 10:51:53 PM
2 votes:
The second sentence is pointing out that correlation is not causation, but that doesn't negate the fact that the figures showed a correlation.

If I said "My uncle had a haircut and the next day he died" I could point out that the two were not necessarily connected but that wouldn't change the fact that my uncle did have a haircut and he did die.
2014-05-14 01:07:37 AM
1 votes:

worlddan: MisterTweak: I don't think "debunked" means what you think it means, smits.

That's what I came to say. There is nothing in the second sentence that debunks the study.


What the second sentence does is show that the study doesn't show that the headline is true; which is not the same thing either.

It basically says: ZOMG! SOLVENTS CAUSE MEMORY LOSS!!...[second paragraph] maybe, maybe not.
 
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