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(Daily Mail)   It was the "Stone Age" not the "Stoned Age", got it?   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 21
    More: Interesting, Stone Age, paintings, industrial society, floras, hallucinogenic mushrooms, opium poppies, Italian Alps, caves  
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1923 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 May 2014 at 3:22 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



21 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-05-13 02:43:36 PM  
Got it, thanks Daily Fail. After all, if Fark greenlights everything you put out everyday, I trust that all of this has been peer reviewed by the highest intelligent types in the world, right?
 
2014-05-13 03:23:32 PM  
Atouk puff puff Lana?
 
2014-05-13 03:32:02 PM  
The Stoned Age was a funny movie.
 
2014-05-13 03:32:12 PM  
img.fark.net
Don't forget the Schnappster!
 
2014-05-13 03:38:09 PM  
Same old same old.  Apparently, to Archeologists, everything in the past was about religion.  Every building, every object, every gathering, every behavior, every thing every where, every time.  RELIGION!
 
2014-05-13 03:45:20 PM  

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Same old same old.  Apparently, to Archeologists, everything in the past was about religion.  Every building, every object, every gathering, every behavior, every thing every where, every time.  RELIGION!


I thought it was always about a series of small walls.
 
2014-05-13 03:45:48 PM  

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Same old same old.  Apparently, to Archeologists, everything in the past was about religion.  Every building, every object, every gathering, every behavior, every thing every where, every time.  RELIGION!


Archeologist: "You see this votive? A female figure with enlarged hips and breasts; it's clearly a tribute to a fertility goddess."

Me: "Hey, maybe cave men just really liked tits and ass."
 
2014-05-13 03:47:12 PM  

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Same old same old.  Apparently, to Archeologists, everything in the past was about religion.  Every building, every object, every gathering, every behavior, every thing every where, every time.  RELIGION!


There are some good theories out there on religion and settlements;  but it's a chicken and the egg situation... did religion cause people to settle down? Or did settling down cause religion?? ...they are tied quite closely
 
2014-05-13 03:54:09 PM  
i1.ytimg.com
Yabba dabba doobie!
 
2014-05-13 03:57:34 PM  

Mjeck: Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Same old same old.  Apparently, to Archeologists, everything in the past was about religion.  Every building, every object, every gathering, every behavior, every thing every where, every time.  RELIGION!

There are some good theories out there on religion and settlements;  but it's a chicken and the egg situation... did religion cause people to settle down? Or did settling down cause religion?? ...they are tied quite closely


Gobekli Tepe has really thrown a wrench in the works. It's a huge stone monument covered with carved animals that predates agriculture. In order to build it, people would have needed established communities, division of labor (some to build and others to provide food for them), a rudimentary government (to provide organization and guidance). Basically a whole bunch of things that we didn't think people had 12,000 years ago.
 
2014-05-13 04:08:13 PM  

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Same old same old.  Apparently, to Archeologists, everything in the past was about religion.  Every building, every object, every gathering, every behavior, every thing every where, every time.  RELIGION!


I can't wait until they start excavating golf courses.
 
2014-05-13 04:08:33 PM  

cgraves67: Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Same old same old.  Apparently, to Archeologists, everything in the past was about religion.  Every building, every object, every gathering, every behavior, every thing every where, every time.  RELIGION!

Archeologist: "You see this votive? A female figure with enlarged hips and breasts; it's clearly a tribute to a fertility goddess."

Me: "Hey, maybe cave men just really liked tits and ass."


Me:  How do you know it isn't the equivalent of a Barbie Doll?  You know, the modern plastic toy with enlarged hips and breasts?
 
2014-05-13 04:09:38 PM  

cgraves67: Mjeck: Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Same old same old.  Apparently, to Archeologists, everything in the past was about religion.  Every building, every object, every gathering, every behavior, every thing every where, every time.  RELIGION!

There are some good theories out there on religion and settlements;  but it's a chicken and the egg situation... did religion cause people to settle down? Or did settling down cause religion?? ...they are tied quite closely

Gobekli Tepe has really thrown a wrench in the works. It's a huge stone monument covered with carved animals that predates agriculture. In order to build it, people would have needed established communities, division of labor (some to build and others to provide food for them), a rudimentary government (to provide organization and guidance). Basically a whole bunch of things that we didn't think people had 12,000 years ago.


Yeah... and I wonder about the bull;  ...they worshipped the bull at a later date; but did that turn into the devil with horns?  What was wrong with the bull? dangerous? Danger? Is the rise of the artist linked to this time?  bullfighting? Dancing? painting?
 
2014-05-13 04:26:49 PM  

MFAWG: Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Same old same old.  Apparently, to Archeologists, everything in the past was about religion.  Every building, every object, every gathering, every behavior, every thing every where, every time.  RELIGION!

I can't wait until they start excavating golf courses.


I worked at one that was recently excavated and redesigned, did I miss something?
 
2014-05-13 04:31:00 PM  
Gack.

"Cave Men" didn't mostly live in caves. But caves are very good at preserving things.

FTFA: "Study leader Elisa Guerra-Doce said most traces of sensory-altering products were in tombs and ceremonial places, prompting her to believe such substances are strongly linked to ritual usage."

Tombs and ceremonial places (aka interpreting caves as ceremonial places) are good at preserving things. If "cave men" spent every day life in a thatched hut often drugged up you would find little trace of it.
 
2014-05-13 04:33:53 PM  
I'm smelling a lot of "ifs" and "perhaps" coming off this study.  And even if their hypothesis is correct it doesn't prove that alcohol and other drugs weren't also used for fun.

Hell, we already have lots of modern day examples of animals that intentionally consume naturally fermented fruits and get drunk.  Not to mention small primates in certain vacation spots that are known to steal people's alcoholic drinks when they aren't looking.
 
2014-05-13 05:04:02 PM  
Well we can examine through analogy hunter-gatherer and chiefdoms that still exist or that Europeans encountered and determine some general features of drug and alcohol use in ancient times. I don't agree with this conclusion.

Though there is an astounding amount of variation between groups, the age of exploration brought European thinkers into contact with 3 big groups: Africans, American Indians, and Australian aborigines. In reference to the conclusions of the article, it's entirely false for Africans as a group. They made alcohol (invented it), sought out caffeine (invented coffee), found plants and animals to get high, and do this over a huge spatial area and the temporal depth of this kind of thing was probably ancient. More on religion below.

In north and South America, the natives did a lot of different kinds of drugs and had tobacco - a plant so valuable, it was distributed across the whole hemisphere everywhere it would grow before Columbus. There are tobacco phytoliths in soil horizons even in Canada. The indigenous people of Central Mexico and possibly the Pacific Northwest even had alcohol, the Aztecs setting the legal drinking age at 40 (!). But religion again later.

I do know that the Australian aborigines had psychoactive drugs, but I don't really know much about the Australian Paleolithic, except to say that everything I've occasionally read suggests that they were the most singularly weird people ever (in a good way).

But lots of these drugs were for religious use only, right? They were used in the context of the ceremonial and ritualistic apparatus of social life in a society and were not to be used trivially, right? Except there is no feature of religion that means it's automatically not fun. From the tip of Hokkaido to Iceland, alcohol is consumed during or after just about every major ritualistic or ceremonial event they have. Only some 7th century lame-os don't...except when they do. In school, I read a lot about Plains Indian age, warrior, and ceremonial societies which existed within a tribe or band to distinguish people and distribute various kinds of religious and culturally relevant knowledge and rituals. Today, those societies that survive are a bit ossified and taken very seriously by their practitioners today. However, the early ethnographers wrote a lot about how similar societies changed spatially and temporally across the plains and differed from group to group and the differences suggested that these were largely arbitrary or idiosyncratic, so much of seemed to be just thought up one day by somebody as something to do. Many of the rituals of these societies were very serious, but others seemed to be just for fun and laughs - have a dance, somebody wears a bear costume and beats up the guy in an elk costume, win a foot race and get a magic arrow and such.

Drug and alcohol abuse is a serious problem and it is exacerbated by mass manufacturing and distribution. The topics of concern to archaeology and anthropology are always political and this type of study isn't any different. I'm mainly suggesting here that we don't either diminish or elevate the status of our ancestors, but understand that they were as smart as us, had the same kind of motivations and ideas, even the same kinds of problems. It was a different world back then, but people just like us lived there.
 
2014-05-13 05:05:29 PM  
Yeah, I know what you're talkin' about.  There was a time when man did live in caves.  As we all know, these people were known as cave men, neanderthal men or troglodytes.


What we're gonna do right here is go back.  Way back, back into time.  When the only people that existed were troglodytes, cave men, cave women... Neanderthal... troglodytes. Let's take the average cave man at home, listening to his stereo.

/Hot Pants
 
2014-05-13 05:40:18 PM  
and remember they threw rocks at jesus and he fell of his donkey... he was NOT stoned off his ass
 
2014-05-13 05:52:43 PM  

SquiggsIN: troglodytes are chimpanzees.  Pan troglodytes to be exact


You may be right, but chimpanzee or not, he'd get up, tryin' to do his thing. He'd begin to move, something like this: "Dance...dance".  When he got tired of dancing alone, he'd look in the mirror, he'd say,"Gotta find a woman gotta find a woman gotta find a woman gotta find a woman".  He'd go down to the lake where all the women would be swimming or washing clothes or something. He'd look around and just reach in and grab one.
 
2014-05-13 09:45:29 PM  

cgraves67: Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Same old same old.  Apparently, to Archeologists, everything in the past was about religion.  Every building, every object, every gathering, every behavior, every thing every where, every time.  RELIGION!

Archeologist: "You see this votive? A female figure with enlarged hips and breasts; it's clearly a tribute to a fertility goddess."

Me: "Hey, maybe cave men just really liked tits and ass."


You're assuming a man was the sculptor: http://faculty.ucmo.edu/ldm4683/6.htm (NSFW warning, nudes.)
 
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