If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Slate)   Glenn Greenwald's book No Place to Hide asserts that the NSA "routinely" bugs computer equipment made in the US and sent abroad. Wait, what? The US makes computer equipment and sends it abroad???   (slate.com) divider line 39
    More: Ironic, Glenn Greenwald, NSA, networking hardware, computer equipment, signals intelligences, equipment  
•       •       •

1501 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 May 2014 at 5:31 AM (10 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



39 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-05-12 10:52:56 PM
Yes, we make computer components, and then we send a broad to spy on foreign nations.
 
2014-05-12 10:57:05 PM
How the hell is this news?

Really. I was at the crypto museum just outside Ft. Meade years ago and the staff talked about doing this with printers that went to Iraq before Gulf War 1.0. Anyone that's surprised by this is an idiot.
 
2014-05-12 10:58:08 PM
There's nothing like eating abroad...
 
2014-05-12 11:38:32 PM

enry: How the hell is this news?

Really. I was at the crypto museum just outside Ft. Meade years ago and the staff talked about doing this with printers that went to Iraq before Gulf War 1.0. Anyone that's surprised by this is an idiot.


Well, perhaps because the House Intelligence Committee cost Huawei and ZTE potentially many billions of dollars in US business, part of which is passed on to US consumers as they have fewer options to choose from on network and telephone hardware. This is a public report based, supposedly, on classified information reviewed by the Committee.

It seems likely they knew that companies like Cisco and Juniper - companies who contributed generously to members of that committee - were doing exactly what they claimed Huawei and ZTE were doing. And they were getting kickbacks compensation from the US taxpayers.

I'm not surprised at all by the intelligence gathering methods, but I am surprised we allow House members to not only lie to us, but to accept donations from companies benefitting from those lies, and - to me the REAL pitchforks-and-torches stuff - possibly leveraging classified information to affect markets which they actively invested in.
 
2014-05-12 11:56:17 PM

Steve Zodiac: Yes, we make computer components, and then we send a broad to spy on foreign nations.


I thought that stuff was all made in China?
 
2014-05-13 01:42:49 AM
Wait, the NSA is sending computer equipment to broads?

Did Frankie and Dino hatch this plan?
 
2014-05-13 02:49:55 AM
I thought dames didn't like being called broads?
 
2014-05-13 03:29:42 AM

MisterTweak: enry: How the hell is this news?

Really. I was at the crypto museum just outside Ft. Meade years ago and the staff talked about doing this with printers that went to Iraq before Gulf War 1.0. Anyone that's surprised by this is an idiot.

Well, perhaps because the House Intelligence Committee cost Huawei and ZTE potentially many billions of dollars in US business, part of which is passed on to US consumers as they have fewer options to choose from on network and telephone hardware. This is a public report based, supposedly, on classified information reviewed by the Committee.

It seems likely they knew that companies like Cisco and Juniper - companies who contributed generously to members of that committee - were doing exactly what they claimed Huawei and ZTE were doing. And they were getting kickbacks compensation from the US taxpayers.

I'm not surprised at all by the intelligence gathering methods, but I am surprised we allow House members to not only lie to us, but to accept donations from companies benefitting from those lies, and - to me the REAL pitchforks-and-torches stuff - possibly leveraging classified information to affect markets which they actively invested in.


It sounds like they were intercepting equipment without the mfgr's knowledge.

Also, they probably knew hauwei was an active component of Chinese espionage versus being an unknowing pawn like US companies.
 
2014-05-13 04:27:58 AM
yeah, sure.
 
2014-05-13 05:02:42 AM

fusillade762: Steve Zodiac: Yes, we make computer components, and then we send a broad to spy on foreign nations.

I thought that stuff was all made in China?


5cense.com
It's not the simplest explanation of why all hardware and all software sucks, but it wouldn't surprise me if it weren't true in some instances. Neither side knows how deep the rabbit hole goes, and "best practices" for individuals and enterprises serve only as the wall that's getting drilled from both ends. It's a mad world.
 
2014-05-13 05:32:27 AM

Danger Avoid Death: I thought dames didn't like being called broads?


Nah, dames are okay when you call them broads. They object to sugar tits, coont, and chicks
 
2014-05-13 05:33:31 AM
Ill take a broad...
 
2014-05-13 05:54:55 AM
American components, Russian components, ALL MADE IN TAIWAN!! *THWACK*
 
2014-05-13 06:02:01 AM
I thought Google and Facebook spied for everyone.
 
2014-05-13 06:20:35 AM

Steve Zodiac: Yes, we make computer components, and then we send a broad to spy on foreign nations.


What a broad spying on foreign nations may look like:

i.imgur.com
 
2014-05-13 06:23:48 AM
I thought that was assumed to be the case with all computer equipment shipped to a market other than the one it was produced in and sometimes even then.
 
2014-05-13 06:30:05 AM

enry: How the hell is this news?

Really. I was at the crypto museum just outside Ft. Meade years ago and the staff talked about doing this with printers that went to Iraq before Gulf War 1.0. Anyone that's surprised by this is an idiot.


I am shocked, SHOCKED that there is gambling in this establishment.
 
2014-05-13 06:43:41 AM
The shiat we use today is probably bugged.  If not by the NSA, then by Chinese saboteurs.
 
2014-05-13 07:19:24 AM
Why that's just terrible.  I don't know how many times I've told these boys "Never call chicks broads."
 
2014-05-13 07:22:56 AM
Imagine that.  Shouldn't it all be coming from China?
 
2014-05-13 07:32:52 AM
As far as the Chinese sigint vs NSA sigint being built into hardware, why not both? If the two agencies want to watch over the masses, just share the keys.
 
2014-05-13 07:35:28 AM
Wait, what? The US makes computer equipment and sends it abroad???

Not anymore....
 
2014-05-13 07:58:07 AM

Steve Zodiac: Yes, we make computer components, and then we send a broad to spy on foreign nations.


The chips are made in taiwan, china, korea, and japan.

They are shipped to the US, where we program them to spy on people or destroy their uranium centrifuges.

Then we ship them abroad.
 
2014-05-13 08:11:11 AM
The big problem is that they are spying on the domestic broads.

They record every digital transaction. Record every personal note and letter sent digitally. They make a copy of our phone bill and file it away for future use. And we make fun of North Korea.
 
2014-05-13 08:17:02 AM

badhatharry: The big problem is that they are spying on the domestic broads.

They record every digital transaction. Record every personal note and letter sent digitally. They make a copy of our phone bill and file it away for future use. And we make fun of North Korea.


Solution:  Analog.
 
2014-05-13 08:36:55 AM
So glad pc production has been shifted to China, they will never do anything like this
 
2014-05-13 08:54:27 AM
Wow Obama
 
2014-05-13 09:02:49 AM
This sounds rather complicated.  It seems much easier to just hack or uses viruses on millions of modems and routers and insert firmware that spies for you.  The logistics of physically opening shipments and tweaking HW is rather complicated on a scale that would make a difference.  Everything runs on Linux now anyway.
 
2014-05-13 09:02:57 AM

svanmeter: Wow Obama


Because the NSA wasn't even thinking about committing domestic espionage before 20 Jan 2009.
 
2014-05-13 09:45:17 AM

wildcardjack: As far as the Chinese sigint vs NSA sigint being built into hardware, why not both? If the two agencies want to watch over the masses, just share the keys.


They both probably do that already. Well, they might not share the keys, but if the U.S. is doing it you can bet the Chinese are, too.

/Hi NSA!
 
2014-05-13 09:52:33 AM
Twilight Farkle: ... It's a mad mad mad mad mad mad world.

ftfm.
 
2014-05-13 10:24:24 AM

Cubansaltyballs: MisterTweak: enry: How the hell is this news?

Really. I was at the crypto museum just outside Ft. Meade years ago and the staff talked about doing this with printers that went to Iraq before Gulf War 1.0. Anyone that's surprised by this is an idiot.

Well, perhaps because the House Intelligence Committee cost Huawei and ZTE potentially many billions of dollars in US business, part of which is passed on to US consumers as they have fewer options to choose from on network and telephone hardware. This is a public report based, supposedly, on classified information reviewed by the Committee.

It seems likely they knew that companies like Cisco and Juniper - companies who contributed generously to members of that committee - were doing exactly what they claimed Huawei and ZTE were doing. And they were getting kickbacks compensation from the US taxpayers.

I'm not surprised at all by the intelligence gathering methods, but I am surprised we allow House members to not only lie to us, but to accept donations from companies benefitting from those lies, and - to me the REAL pitchforks-and-torches stuff - possibly leveraging classified information to affect markets which they actively invested in.

It sounds like they were intercepting equipment without the mfgr's knowledge.

Also, they probably knew hauwei was an active component of Chinese espionage versus being an unknowing pawn like US companies.


It's easier than that in some cases.  The fed had access to some of those companies source code after check in, but before signing.  For years.  Especially in 'security products' that were designed to analyze network traffic.  They could change the source every single software iteration and no one would be the wiser.  Or at least those who wanted to keep their jobs and not have the fed on them would keep quiet.
 
2014-05-13 10:37:50 AM

King Something: svanmeter: Wow Obama

Because the NSA wasn't even thinking about committing domestic espionage before 20 Jan 2009.


Six plus years of ObamaNSA, ObamaDrones, ObamaIRS... It's getting harder and harder for you to shift blame.

/you will not be punished for your anger. You will be punished BY your anger. Buddha
 
2014-05-13 10:49:47 AM
I recall an old cold war story where the US let the Soviets steal some software that was used to help run oil/gas pipelines and when the Soviets installed the software it caused some pipeline catastrophy.
 
2014-05-13 11:07:09 AM

ChrisDe: wildcardjack: As far as the Chinese sigint vs NSA sigint being built into hardware, why not both? If the two agencies want to watch over the masses, just share the keys.

They both probably do that already. Well, they might not share the keys, but if the U.S. is doing it you can bet the Chinese are, too.

/Hi NSA!


They've cooperated before.  The NSA and the Chinese set up a combined monitoring station in North-western China to eavesdrop on Soviet missile tests:

http://www.nytimes.com/1981/06/18/world/us-and-peking-join-in-tracki ng -missiles-in-soviet.html

The equipment was American, but the technicians were Chinese, and the two nations shared the output.

The person who arranged it on the US side?  Senator Joe Biden.
 
2014-05-13 11:10:54 AM
Greenwald has become a provocateur foremost.  I wouldn't look to him for responsible and factual reporting.

/media needs provocateurs too.
 
2014-05-13 12:01:09 PM
Meh, Greenwald lost his moral standing when he started using the information to launch his own site/books/etc. 

Now he's in for monetary gain. Screw principle.
 
2014-05-13 12:22:28 PM
www.cryptomuseum.com
 
2014-05-13 09:15:54 PM
I work at a chip manufacturing facility so the kicks I am getting.
 
Displayed 39 of 39 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report