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(Wisconsin Gazette)   The James Beard Foundation's best cookbook contains recipes no one wants to make or eat   (wisconsingazette.com) divider line 38
    More: Amusing, James Beard Foundation, Heston Blumenthal, Rene Redzepi, cookbooks, David Chang, recipes, Ina Garten  
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5364 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 May 2014 at 5:43 PM (18 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



38 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-05-12 04:56:39 PM
Did someone say Old English?

www.messengerpuppet.com
 
2014-05-12 05:27:01 PM
Powdered duck.  Sounds like the turkey my mother in law makes that reminds me of astronaut food.
 
2014-05-12 05:30:56 PM
25.media.tumblr.com
 
2014-05-12 05:45:47 PM
Shut up submitter and eat your ramen
 
2014-05-12 05:55:33 PM
FTA:Outstanding food personality or host went to Food Network's Ina Garten for her "Barefoot Contessa: Back to Basics." 

You've got to be kidding... I can't stand that woman. She's so... fake. I mean, yeah, she's a TV 'personality' (and I use that term very loosely with regard to her) so there is some expectation of fake-ness, but she is unbearably, annoyingly, unforgivably fake.
 
2014-05-12 05:56:01 PM
They don't sell obtuse where I live
 
2014-05-12 05:56:34 PM
I have to admit, as an ex foodservice person (many roles), I'd probably like to have a look at this book, I'm sure it's full of interesting stuff from a historical perspective.  Or as my mother always said, it's the type of recipe that begins "Dice one Elk"

Anyone remember the reduction of beef for Maurice episode of "Northern Exposure"?
 
2014-05-12 05:59:20 PM

bmwericus: I have to admit, as an ex foodservice person (many roles), I'd probably like to have a look at this book, I'm sure it's full of interesting stuff from a historical perspective.  Or as my mother always said, it's the type of recipe that begins "Dice one Elk"

Anyone remember the reduction of beef for Maurice episode of "Northern Exposure"?


40 heads of cattle. That was hysterical.
 
2014-05-12 06:00:24 PM

bmwericus: Or as my mother always said, it's the type of recipe that begins "Dice one Elk"


Or  "Have the Maid Make a Roux"
 
2014-05-12 06:01:04 PM
Obligatory:

thewrittenwordreviews.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-05-12 06:03:34 PM

Nabb1: bmwericus: I have to admit, as an ex foodservice person (many roles), I'd probably like to have a look at this book, I'm sure it's full of interesting stuff from a historical perspective.  Or as my mother always said, it's the type of recipe that begins "Dice one Elk"

Anyone remember the reduction of beef for Maurice episode of "Northern Exposure"?

40 heads of cattle. That was hysterical.


when i saw old english recipes, i was thinking pre-christian anglo-saxon recipes.  was curious.

 i had a friend who tried to cook from a medieval cook book, and make beer from it too.  it was a disarming moment when a beer recipe called for a few pounds of yeast.

/ we did a little research and realized that a few pounds of yeast = a few pounds of bread.
 
2014-05-12 06:08:44 PM
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-05-12 06:16:01 PM

Nabb1: bmwericus: I have to admit, as an ex foodservice person (many roles), I'd probably like to have a look at this book, I'm sure it's full of interesting stuff from a historical perspective.  Or as my mother always said, it's the type of recipe that begins "Dice one Elk"

Anyone remember the reduction of beef for Maurice episode of "Northern Exposure"?

40 heads of cattle. That was hysterical.


I thought it was just one whole side of beef, turned into 1/4 cup of reduction, but I only saw the episode one time.  I think that was Alan Arkin as the itinerant chef...

That was a great show overall.  Trebuchet?
 
2014-05-12 06:20:08 PM

pute kisses like a man: Nabb1: bmwericus: I have to admit, as an ex foodservice person (many roles), I'd probably like to have a look at this book, I'm sure it's full of interesting stuff from a historical perspective.  Or as my mother always said, it's the type of recipe that begins "Dice one Elk"

Anyone remember the reduction of beef for Maurice episode of "Northern Exposure"?

40 heads of cattle. That was hysterical.

when i saw old english recipes, i was thinking pre-christian anglo-saxon recipes.  was curious.

 i had a friend who tried to cook from a medieval cook book, and make beer from it too.  it was a disarming moment when a beer recipe called for a few pounds of yeast.

/ we did a little research and realized that a few pounds of yeast = a few pounds of bread.


Even some books we have use names for cuts of beef and such that are obsolete - for some reason, they rename stuff all the time - same cut, new name.  something about marketing apparently.

I imagine there are also a lot of sauces and such that they simply assumed your cooks knew how to make.
 
2014-05-12 06:36:04 PM
A cookbook in this day and age makes about as much sense as the phone book
 
2014-05-12 06:43:49 PM

Persnickety: A cookbook in this day and age makes about as much sense as the phone book


Hey, I miss the phone book - the original bell phone book was a really good resource in the pre-computer age.

I know, it sucks that us olds and paper still have a relationship.  I like having some things not dependent on electrical power supplies, etc.

/use e-books
//still like paper too
///just don't have room
////for all dem trees
 
2014-05-12 06:49:59 PM
Now I can have Grendel's mother over for dinner.  Woo hoo!
 
2014-05-12 06:50:17 PM
The taste of despair and consumption
 
2014-05-12 07:00:18 PM

Persnickety: A cookbook in this day and age makes about as much sense as the phone book


Grandma would like to have a word with you with her frying pan and rolling pin
 
2014-05-12 07:10:18 PM
I've had a blast with this one: http://www.amazon.com/Mad-Hungry-Feeding-Men-Boys/dp/1579655122
i1211.photobucket.com

The cream cheese crust recipe is to die for.
 
2014-05-12 07:12:23 PM
I am definitely going to buy this book.. it sounds properly interesting.
 
2014-05-12 07:30:52 PM
http://medievalcookery.com/books/neapo.jpg

On mobile, so no linky. This is a really interesting cookbook. Southern Italian food, before the discovery of the New World.
 
2014-05-12 07:41:23 PM

Persnickety: A cookbook in this day and age makes about as much sense as the phone book


You must enjoy having an SEO company and an advertising company decide which companies they will let find out about. (Oh, and it's so easy to narrow your search to a geographical area of just a few cities around you when you Google for something.)
 
2014-05-12 07:50:54 PM

gaspode: I am definitely going to buy this book.. it sounds properly interesting.


Its only $125 on Amazon.

/added to my wish list
 
wee [TotalFark]
2014-05-12 07:52:53 PM
cdn.cheftalk.com

Recently got this as a gift.  Has all kinds of cool recipes.  Of course, you need to find replacements for ingredients like manatee suet, but that's half the fun. Or something.
 
2014-05-12 07:54:08 PM

JohnnyC: FTA:Outstanding food personality or host went to Food Network's Ina Garten for her "Barefoot Contessa: Back to Basics." 

You've got to be kidding... I can't stand that woman. She's so... fake. I mean, yeah, she's a TV 'personality' (and I use that term very loosely with regard to her) so there is some expectation of fake-ness, but she is unbearably, annoyingly, unforgivably fake.


She is pretentious and falsely self deprecating, begging for compliments from her rich friends. I can't stand her.
 
2014-05-12 08:20:13 PM

Vitamin Pb: Persnickety: A cookbook in this day and age makes about as much sense as the phone book

You must enjoy having an SEO company and an advertising company decide which companies they will let find out about. (Oh, and it's so easy to narrow your search to a geographical area of just a few cities around you when you Google for something.)


Unlike books which people never buy due to marketing.  http://eater.com/archives/2014/01/10/best-selling-cookbooks-2013.php
 
2014-05-12 08:43:56 PM
I'm quite interested in it, actually, but then again I'm in the SCA so I like re-creating historical things.  We get a fair amount of usage out of Eating Shakespeare, for example.
 
2014-05-12 09:22:10 PM

pute kisses like a man: Nabb1: bmwericus: I have to admit, as an ex foodservice person (many roles), I'd probably like to have a look at this book, I'm sure it's full of interesting stuff from a historical perspective.  Or as my mother always said, it's the type of recipe that begins "Dice one Elk"

Anyone remember the reduction of beef for Maurice episode of "Northern Exposure"?

40 heads of cattle. That was hysterical.

when i saw old english recipes, i was thinking pre-christian anglo-saxon recipes.  was curious.

 i had a friend who tried to cook from a medieval cook book, and make beer from it too.  it was a disarming moment when a beer recipe called for a few pounds of yeast.

/ we did a little research and realized that a few pounds of yeast = a few pounds of bread.


I have a friend who's apparently very well known in the SCA for his historical cookery, so I'm getting a kick....
 
2014-05-12 09:47:56 PM
This and the IACP Awards are kind of notorious for choosing books that look awesome, but are otherwise not usable. They're usually meant to sell in a restaurant as a high-end souvenier. Hundreds of books go out each year. It's highly likely no one reads them on the judging panel, they just kind of thumb through.

Many of them don't make money, but are done to attract prestige to the other cookbooks on a publisher's list. it
 
2014-05-12 11:06:49 PM

bmwericus: I thought it was just one whole side of beef, turned into 1/4 cup of reduction, but I only saw the episode one time. I think that was Alan Arkin as the itinerant chef...


Adam Arkin, his son.

"Frenchie! Fetch me my knives."
 
2014-05-12 11:55:47 PM

ChubbyTiger: http://medievalcookery.com/books/neapo.jpg

On mobile, so no linky. This is a really interesting cookbook. Southern Italian food, before the discovery of the New World.


Here's the Amazon link but holy crap, it's $145! Still, looks extremely interesting!
 
2014-05-13 12:09:11 AM

uncleacid: They don't sell obtuse where I live


You get obtuse from triangles.
 
2014-05-13 12:47:14 AM
On the bookshelf to my right is Le Repertoire de La Cuisine by Louis Saulnier. Try some of this madness sometime ..
 
2014-05-13 08:22:02 AM

Quasar: JohnnyC: FTA:Outstanding food personality or host went to Food Network's Ina Garten for her "Barefoot Contessa: Back to Basics." 

You've got to be kidding... I can't stand that woman. She's so... fake. I mean, yeah, she's a TV 'personality' (and I use that term very loosely with regard to her) so there is some expectation of fake-ness, but she is unbearably, annoyingly, unforgivably fake.

She is pretentious and falsely self deprecating, begging for compliments from her rich friends. I can't stand her.


She has an extremely punchable face.  My mother likes her and ever aspect of her show makes me want to climb through the screen and punch her.  "Today we are going on a picnic with my interior designer who just finished up work on my guest house"....oh shut the fark up!!  The only personality worse is that "French Food at Home" chick.
 
2014-05-13 12:54:29 PM

Anayalator: [4.bp.blogspot.com image 850x948]


the only good vegan food on earth probably comes from india and surrounding areas.

vegan for western palates, which is basically substitution vegan food for real food, is invariably terrible.  but, there's lot's of indian and pakistani foods that are vegan that are actually delicious.
 
2014-05-13 03:11:46 PM
$200 is for the fancy edition, and Amazon is actually selling it for $125.

The ordinary edition is on sale for $45 for pre-order. I just did. It sounds awesome.
 
2014-05-13 09:41:12 PM
"First, catch yourself a rabbit".
 
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