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(Timmay)   Here are some Dos and Don'ts for travelling in a wheelchair. Surprisingly enough, the list works for anyone, even if you don't travel in a wheelchair   (handicapthis.com) divider line 40
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5346 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 May 2014 at 1:13 PM (11 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



40 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-05-11 01:21:48 PM
Don't piss off your best friend who happens to be able to control magnetism.
 
2014-05-11 01:25:17 PM
Double check to make sure your brakes work.
 
2014-05-11 01:27:36 PM
Never allow your friends and co workers use you as a some sort of travel cart for their luggage.
 
2014-05-11 01:29:02 PM

cowgirl toffee: Never allow your friends and co workers use you as a some sort of travel cart for their luggage.


That is incredibly evil, thank you for the suggestion )
 
2014-05-11 01:30:23 PM
Dunno if i agree with that first part about air travel. They say get a seat in the fist row but i did that on one flight and my ass was sore as hell for days afterwards.
 
2014-05-11 01:35:15 PM
Seems to me that you would have to be really strong and patient to do much traveling in a wheelchair.
 
2014-05-11 01:43:15 PM
Don't stick your dick in the mashed potatoes, NTTIAWWT
 
2014-05-11 01:45:28 PM
oi62.tinypic.com
 
2014-05-11 01:45:54 PM

SpdrJay: Seems to me that you would have to be really strong and patient to do much traveling in a wheelchair.


Eh, we get to board first.  Good for when you're flying the cattle-cars that are Southwest.
 
2014-05-11 01:49:03 PM
i59.tinypic.com
 
2014-05-11 01:53:42 PM

okaykleek: SpdrJay: Seems to me that you would have to be really strong and patient to do much traveling in a wheelchair.

Eh, we get to board first.  Good for when you're flying the cattle-cars that are Southwest.


An airliner, or something, just flew over your head when you typed that....
 
2014-05-11 01:55:08 PM
And I saved the most important thing for last.

Last thing:



Um...k....
 
2014-05-11 01:57:51 PM
I don't care if he is your boss... don't let that fat, sweaty f*ck use your chair because his "feet hurt".
 
2014-05-11 01:57:59 PM
i.ytimg.com

i.imgur.com
 
2014-05-11 01:58:39 PM

The sound of one hand clapping: Dunno if i agree with that first part about air travel. They say get a seat in the fist row but i did that on one flight and my ass was sore as hell for days afterwards.


Meh its all down to preparation, buy yourself an anal intruder and you will be flying pain free in no time


i135.photobucket.com
 
2014-05-11 02:10:20 PM
This next tip is very important: if you have an iPod and you can't control it, please, please, please, for your own sanity and for those around you get a book from iTunes

What??
I would rather listen to the occasional shiatty song than an entire boring-ass book.
 
2014-05-11 02:49:54 PM

Begoggle: This next tip is very important: if you have an iPod and you can't control it, please, please, please, for your own sanity and for those around you get a book from iTunes

What??
I would rather listen to the occasional shiatty song than an entire boring-ass book.


I used to listen to all of the J.R.R. Tolkien stories on ebook on my ride to work and back every night.  Much better than listening to the same 10 - 15 repeating songs on the radio.
 
2014-05-11 02:53:28 PM
Lol! The submitter's Timmay hahaha :D

"Mrrkkk grbbbmkkk.. mrrkk... fark.... mrrrkk..... TIIIMMMAAAAYYY!!!"
 
2014-05-11 02:55:16 PM
I'm a couple years away from being in a wheelchair (chronic, deteriorating pain, thanks), and having used a wheelchair a few times, here's the best advice I've got:

You aren't a grocery cart. You aren't magically capable of going longer distances. No ma'am/sir, I don't use this chair because I'm "lazy." Stop staring, please. Yes, I can still feel you poking my legs--stop it.

All that being said, it is still surprising how "nice" people can be when they see you have a handicap. I walk with a cane, and people go out of their way to open doors, clear narrow aisles, and so forth.
 
2014-05-11 02:55:31 PM
www.hcrealms.com
Don't compare superpowers with the non-handicapped near the stairs. Escalators are the same problem really. Don't do that either.
4.bp.blogspot.com
Brofist everybody. EVERYBODY, it's a good cover story. You never know when the airport lounge will offer free maitais to their favorite mutie. Bam, you're sloshed, suddenly you can't reach all the way over there with your mind. You'll have to go and suck the memories out of your enemies skin-to-skin. See what I mean?

Also learn to brofist properly. This looks suspiciously open-handed.
brainstomping.files.wordpress.com
Drill a hole in your forehead and have your brain scooped out and replaced with grape soda. You never know when a sentinel will come along and attack, and when they hit you it will automatically shake the soda up. You don't even have to do anything. Do you know how much a deep sea fishing trip costs? You are paying that much to relax, you don't want to have to work too hard at this.

Only have this done by a real neurosurgeon. I have some stories about unlicensed neurosurgeons that you don't want to hear.
www.wallpapernono.com
Traveling is stressful enough. If you have to use one of those handicapped bathrooms (for some unknown reason) without a door (maybe someone shouldn't have been so eager to rip it off the hinges, hint hint, why doncha help me a little more carefully next time you big blue unshaven asshole?) always bring your entourage. No one gets to see the great man doing his business.
www.nocreoqueseasreal.pe
Lastly, if this vacation really does have to be a disaster (we've all had those). If this has to be your trip to the great lakehouse in the sky. Make sure it's your best friend who does you in.

It'll give you a chance to have that last talk, and get in your last few Jewish jokes. Just like old times.
 
2014-05-11 03:02:58 PM

maram500: I'm a couple years away from being in a wheelchair (chronic, deteriorating pain, thanks), and having used a wheelchair a few times, here's the best advice I've got:

You aren't a grocery cart. You aren't magically capable of going longer distances. No ma'am/sir, I don't use this chair because I'm "lazy." Stop staring, please. Yes, I can still feel you poking my legs--stop it.

All that being said, it is still surprising how "nice" people can be when they see you have a handicap. I walk with a cane, and people go out of their way to open doors, clear narrow aisles, and so forth.


Yep... they're all nice when they see you get out of a car with a handicap plate when you have custom leg braces and a device to stabilize your spine. But once you go through years of agonizing surgery and you look "normal", here comes all of the comments about taking someone's parking spot because you're driving "grandma's car".

Just a tiny bit bitter. o_o
 
2014-05-11 03:10:19 PM

cowgirl toffee: maram500: I'm a couple years away from being in a wheelchair (chronic, deteriorating pain, thanks), and having used a wheelchair a few times, here's the best advice I've got:

You aren't a grocery cart. You aren't magically capable of going longer distances. No ma'am/sir, I don't use this chair because I'm "lazy." Stop staring, please. Yes, I can still feel you poking my legs--stop it.

All that being said, it is still surprising how "nice" people can be when they see you have a handicap. I walk with a cane, and people go out of their way to open doors, clear narrow aisles, and so forth.

Yep... they're all nice when they see you get out of a car with a handicap plate when you have custom leg braces and a device to stabilize your spine. But once you go through years of agonizing surgery and you look "normal", here comes all of the comments about taking someone's parking spot because you're driving "grandma's car".

Just a tiny bit bitter. o_o


My sister has the same problem. She had back surgery, and now has a bunch of plates/screws/whatever in her spine and is on permanent disability. But because she's a healthy-looking blonde, people assume she's just faking.
 
2014-05-11 03:38:30 PM
Years ago, I got a fairly nasty infection in my leg. Cat climbed me, and sank a claw deep, and I got an infection between the fat layer and the muscle, and it blew my thigh up by about a third of its girth, and I had to use crutches, and a wheelchair for about a week. The one thing I noticed, when I was using a wheelchair in public, is that if I was with someone--like my fiance--folks automatically turned to her to find out what I wanted. Man in my early 30s, not slurring or incapacitated, but suddenly, I was put into the role of someone being taken care of. I'd ask to see something in a shop, and the clerks would turn to her to see if it was OK. Go to pay for something, they turned to her for the card or the cash. Never mind that I was wheeling myself around on my own power--not being pushed, talking with her in conversational tones, and even bickering amicably--but suddenly, in a wheelchair, I turned apparently deaf, dumb, and mentally handicapped.

On crutches? Everyone was sympathetic, and I was just a guy who had an accident. In a wheelchair? I was suddenly horribly brain damaged, and barely functioning, and if I asked a clerk a direct question, they turned to by bride to be for approval. It was an odd perspective, but one that has sort of shaped how I deal with the public when I have to.
 
2014-05-11 04:27:26 PM
And when using an electric wheelchair or scooter, they may disconnect the battery for safety reasons despite instructions they don't need to from the manufacturer, so when it comes to the gate to meet you it doesn't work, and you are halfway around the world on your own and panicking. Check that first, not after fifteen minutes of equally freaked out airline staff helping (in a well meaning but not actually useful way, cause they don't listen in their stress for you)

Also, some chargers don't work in different voltages. One of my chargers worked in the US, one didn't. TBH,never worked out why, just made sure in future to take the good one. And work out in each city where the nearest scooter hire shop wa s- the chargers are the same for electric wheelchairs as scooters (as an almost infallible rule, there may be some different ones, never seen them yet).

Wear compression stockings. You move less than other travellers.

Know the weight, height and width of your chair. I disagree with pulling it apart - they can lose bits. Be wary of that.

The crews are almost always lovely except on budget airlines who are uniformly horrible. And I got upgraded regularly because I was patient and good mannered about the process.

Plan your journey in detail, and have back up plans for medications and working transport such as wheelchairs. Book disability taxis in advance, and have the electronic confirmation printed and with you.
 
2014-05-11 04:33:13 PM

hubiestubert: Years ago, I got a fairly nasty infection in my leg. Cat climbed me, and sank a claw deep, and I got an infection between the fat layer and the muscle, and it blew my thigh up by about a third of its girth, and I had to use crutches, and a wheelchair for about a week. The one thing I noticed, when I was using a wheelchair in public, is that if I was with someone--like my fiance--folks automatically turned to her to find out what I wanted. Man in my early 30s, not slurring or incapacitated, but suddenly, I was put into the role of someone being taken care of. I'd ask to see something in a shop, and the clerks would turn to her to see if it was OK. Go to pay for something, they turned to her for the card or the cash. Never mind that I was wheeling myself around on my own power--not being pushed, talking with her in conversational tones, and even bickering amicably--but suddenly, in a wheelchair, I turned apparently deaf, dumb, and mentally handicapped.

On crutches? Everyone was sympathetic, and I was just a guy who had an accident. In a wheelchair? I was suddenly horribly brain damaged, and barely functioning, and if I asked a clerk a direct question, they turned to by bride to be for approval. It was an odd perspective, but one that has sort of shaped how I deal with the public when I have to.


HAHAHA oh gods yes. Try being in a large electric wheelchair - think Stephen Hawking. It tilts, so it takes pressure off my spine.

They talk to my kids or my husband. I am a University lecturer in computer science. Tends to shut them up when told that. But before, I get SLOW LOUD SPEECH DEAR. Lady, my spine is borked. Sometimes, in an act of presto spite, because I still have (for now, it is diminishing all too rapidly:( ) some small mobility, I get to my feet, yell "miracle" and collapse again. Great at concerts etc. Or for that first lecture where students are a bit uncertain about me. They blink, then laugh, and when I smirk, they get it. Ice broken. They are told it is okay to ask me questions about it. Break down some barriers.

One woman told me I should commit suicide, in effect - the first day I had my wheelchair, after my spine just got to the point where walking stick wouldn't cut it anymore, I realised I could do so much again I had lost. And as I was waiting for one of my offspring outside a shop, a woman asked me if that was my daughter, proudly, I said it was. She then proceeded to tell me for ten minutes I was lucky, as most kids would not take on such a burden, that she would kill herself in my position, and much along the same lines. I was gobsmacked and went home to weep. But after, I realised she was telling me she was afraid if it happened to her, she would be alone and uncared for.

The don't talk often because we confront them with a fear. As mine was accident and not congenital, it is worse - that could be THEM.

Or they are jerks;)
 
2014-05-11 04:59:14 PM

cowgirl toffee: maram500: I'm a couple years away from being in a wheelchair (chronic, deteriorating pain, thanks), and having used a wheelchair a few times, here's the best advice I've got:

You aren't a grocery cart. You aren't magically capable of going longer distances. No ma'am/sir, I don't use this chair because I'm "lazy." Stop staring, please. Yes, I can still feel you poking my legs--stop it.

All that being said, it is still surprising how "nice" people can be when they see you have a handicap. I walk with a cane, and people go out of their way to open doors, clear narrow aisles, and so forth.

Yep... they're all nice when they see you get out of a car with a handicap plate when you have custom leg braces and a device to stabilize your spine. But once you go through years of agonizing surgery and you look "normal", here comes all of the comments about taking someone's parking spot because you're driving "grandma's car".

Just a tiny bit bitter. o_o


I get the hairy eyeball from people in the parking lot because I can stand (deathgrip on doorframe) long enough to pull my chair out of driver side slider.  Hate to be the bitter handicap dude with chip on shoulder but I feel you getting ready to say something.  I got an expletive locked and loaded for when you do.
 
2014-05-11 05:15:15 PM
timelady:  HAHAHA oh gods yes. Try being in a large electric wheelchair - think Stephen Hawking. It tilts, so it takes pressure off my spine.

They talk to my kids or my husband. I am a University lecturer in computer science. Tends to shut them up when told that. But before, I get SLOW LOUD SPEECH DEAR. Lady, my spine is borked.


I'm a normally fairly relatively private fellow out in public, but the experience taught me that IF you're going to be in a wheelchair in public, you'd best bring your A game with funny, and be a lot more outgoing. Which, as a chef and a theater minor, I can do just fine with, but it was odd to realize that you have to put on that persona to get anywhere with some folks. And there were certainly days when I just wanted to get some Tums, a bag of chips and an iced tea, and NOT have to play to a crowd. And I was only in the damn thing for about a week. It gave me a whole new perspective. Doing customer service on occasion with Glenndale Arena or with Historic Deerfield, I got the rep for the club or the organization for being "better" with those "poor handicapped people" because I went up and talked to them directly, didn't patronize, and joked with them. And it's sort of sad that it took being in that perspective to drive it into my skull. Good on, lady.
 
2014-05-11 06:30:04 PM

okaykleek: cowgirl toffee: maram500: I'm a couple years away from being in a wheelchair (chronic, deteriorating pain, thanks), and having used a wheelchair a few times, here's the best advice I've got:

You aren't a grocery cart. You aren't magically capable of going longer distances. No ma'am/sir, I don't use this chair because I'm "lazy." Stop staring, please. Yes, I can still feel you poking my legs--stop it.

All that being said, it is still surprising how "nice" people can be when they see you have a handicap. I walk with a cane, and people go out of their way to open doors, clear narrow aisles, and so forth.

Yep... they're all nice when they see you get out of a car with a handicap plate when you have custom leg braces and a device to stabilize your spine. But once you go through years of agonizing surgery and you look "normal", here comes all of the comments about taking someone's parking spot because you're driving "grandma's car".

Just a tiny bit bitter. o_o

I get the hairy eyeball from people in the parking lot because I can stand (deathgrip on doorframe) long enough to pull my chair out of driver side slider.  Hate to be the bitter handicap dude with chip on shoulder but I feel you getting ready to say something.  I got an expletive locked and loaded for when you do.


Oh, I hear you. I am so grateful for my limited mobility, but getting my wheelchair out, people have abused me...as if I am faking it. DO you know how many hoops are needed (her in Aus) to get one of these permits, buddy?

Sod off:) (said sweetly, natch)
 
2014-05-11 06:36:25 PM

hubiestubert: timelady:  HAHAHA oh gods yes. Try being in a large electric wheelchair - think Stephen Hawking. It tilts, so it takes pressure off my spine.

They talk to my kids or my husband. I am a University lecturer in computer science. Tends to shut them up when told that. But before, I get SLOW LOUD SPEECH DEAR. Lady, my spine is borked.

I'm a normally fairly relatively private fellow out in public, but the experience taught me that IF you're going to be in a wheelchair in public, you'd best bring your A game with funny, and be a lot more outgoing. Which, as a chef and a theater minor, I can do just fine with, but it was odd to realize that you have to put on that persona to get anywhere with some folks. And there were certainly days when I just wanted to get some Tums, a bag of chips and an iced tea, and NOT have to play to a crowd. And I was only in the damn thing for about a week. It gave me a whole new perspective. Doing customer service on occasion with Glenndale Arena or with Historic Deerfield, I got the rep for the club or the organization for being "better" with those "poor handicapped people" because I went up and talked to them directly, didn't patronize, and joked with them. And it's sort of sad that it took being in that perspective to drive it into my skull. Good on, lady.


Some days,I just get amused. Some days, it becomes a hell of an anecdote to share. Most days, I hit it head on (which oddly enough, is how I got here;) ). Understanding why people are uncomfortable helps deal with it, I have found. Though some days, I do get tired of feeling like I have to be 'the nice cripple' to offset their ignorance...

Of course, I also joke like crazy about being everyone's favourite token, and freely use the cripple term - don't know a disabled person who doesn't. Kind of reclaimed it, sort of 'if you are going to call us that anyway, we will decide how that works'...
 Nice that you gained from it, and sincerely hope you never need to learn it again first hand.
"Yo, join the cripps;)) So I guess you been in my gang, bro! "
There is nothing funnier than a 47yo woman in a large electric wheelchair saying that. In an Aussie accent, no less. SO much cognitive dissonance;))

/ disclaimer - travelling every two months to attend IEEE meetings on wireless standards on my own, I met nothing but kindness and consideration. Americans, especially in the South, can do polite warmth like none else.
 
2014-05-11 06:53:20 PM

maram500: I'm a couple years away from being in a wheelchair (chronic, deteriorating pain, thanks), and having used a wheelchair a few times, here's the best advice I've got:

You aren't a grocery cart. You aren't magically capable of going longer distances. No ma'am/sir, I don't use this chair because I'm "lazy." Stop staring, please. Yes, I can still feel you poking my legs--stop it.

All that being said, it is still surprising how "nice" people can be when they see you have a handicap. I walk with a cane, and people go out of their way to open doors, clear narrow aisles, and so forth.


hey, snap. You are just a bit behind in my journey. Let me know if you ever want to talk - or anyone on here in similar place. Fark Cripps rule;)

timelady [at] gmail dot com - just label it dark cripps, as I drown in student email,s o check personal one less often atm.

/ do your assignments, by the due date, IT SAVES TIME, HONEST
 
2014-05-11 07:35:01 PM

Weatherkiss: Don't piss off your best friend who happens to be able to control magnetism.


I didn't even read the thread until just now. And now I noticed my jokes followed yours.
 
2014-05-11 09:40:18 PM

GreenSun: Lol! The submitter's Timmay hahaha :D

"Mrrkkk grbbbmkkk.. mrrkk... fark.... mrrrkk..... TIIIMMMAAAAYYY!!!"


Is this your car?
 
2014-05-11 09:46:45 PM

timelady: hubiestubert: Years ago, I got a fairly nasty infection in my leg. Cat climbed me, and sank a claw deep, and I got an infection between the fat layer and the muscle, and it blew my thigh up by about a third of its girth, and I had to use crutches, and a wheelchair for about a week. The one thing I noticed, when I was using a wheelchair in public, is that if I was with someone--like my fiance--folks automatically turned to her to find out what I wanted. Man in my early 30s, not slurring or incapacitated, but suddenly, I was put into the role of someone being taken care of. I'd ask to see something in a shop, and the clerks would turn to her to see if it was OK. Go to pay for something, they turned to her for the card or the cash. Never mind that I was wheeling myself around on my own power--not being pushed, talking with her in conversational tones, and even bickering amicably--but suddenly, in a wheelchair, I turned apparently deaf, dumb, and mentally handicapped.

On crutches? Everyone was sympathetic, and I was just a guy who had an accident. In a wheelchair? I was suddenly horribly brain damaged, and barely functioning, and if I asked a clerk a direct question, they turned to by bride to be for approval. It was an odd perspective, but one that has sort of shaped how I deal with the public when I have to.

HAHAHA oh gods yes. Try being in a large electric wheelchair - think Stephen Hawking. It tilts, so it takes pressure off my spine.

They talk to my kids or my husband. I am a University lecturer in computer science. Tends to shut them up when told that. But before, I get SLOW LOUD SPEECH DEAR. Lady, my spine is borked. Sometimes, in an act of presto spite, because I still have (for now, it is diminishing all too rapidly:( ) some small mobility, I get to my feet, yell "miracle" and collapse again. Great at concerts etc. Or for that first lecture where students are a bit uncertain about me. They blink, then laugh, and when I smirk, they get it. Ice broken. They are told it is okay to ask me questions about it. Break down some barriers.

One woman told me I should commit suicide, in effect - the first day I had my wheelchair, after my spine just got to the point where walking stick wouldn't cut it anymore, I realised I could do so much again I had lost. And as I was waiting for one of my offspring outside a shop, a woman asked me if that was my daughter, proudly, I said it was. She then proceeded to tell me for ten minutes I was lucky, as most kids would not take on such a burden, that she would kill herself in my position, and much along the same lines. I was gobsmacked and went home to weep. But after, I realised she was telling me she was afraid if it happened to her, she would be alone and uncared for.

The don't talk often because we confront them with a fear. As mine was accident and not congenital, it is worse - that could be THEM.

Or they are jerks;)


Why you NOT yell "Mein Führer! I can walk!" is beyond me.
 
2014-05-11 09:48:40 PM
Not = don't whatevas.
 
2014-05-11 10:01:38 PM

grumpfuff: cowgirl toffee: maram500: I'm a couple years away from being in a wheelchair (chronic, deteriorating pain, thanks), and having used a wheelchair a few times, here's the best advice I've got:

You aren't a grocery cart. You aren't magically capable of going longer distances. No ma'am/sir, I don't use this chair because I'm "lazy." Stop staring, please. Yes, I can still feel you poking my legs--stop it.

All that being said, it is still surprising how "nice" people can be when they see you have a handicap. I walk with a cane, and people go out of their way to open doors, clear narrow aisles, and so forth.

Yep... they're all nice when they see you get out of a car with a handicap plate when you have custom leg braces and a device to stabilize your spine. But once you go through years of agonizing surgery and you look "normal", here comes all of the comments about taking someone's parking spot because you're driving "grandma's car".

Just a tiny bit bitter. o_o

My sister has the same problem. She had back surgery, and now has a bunch of plates/screws/whatever in her spine and is on permanent disability. But because she's a healthy-looking blonde, people assume she's just faking.


to be fair, about a third of all people using a disabled placard at any given time are not disabled. so there's a good chance someone's faking it, if they look like walking isn't a problem.

/drive disabled people around daily.
//grumble at all the healthy-looking folks taking the disabled spots.
 
2014-05-11 10:57:03 PM
o'really:
to be fair, about a third of all people using a disabled placard at any given time are not disabled. so there's a good chance someone's faking it, if they look like walking isn't a problem.

/drive disabled people around daily.
//grumble at all the healthy-looking folks taking the disabled spots.


At least where I live, you can qualify for a disabled placard if you have a respiratory problem that makes it difficult to walk more than 100 feet without resting.  A lot of people with heart problems LOOK fit, believe it or not.  Might even be able to move around pretty good for a minute or two.  Or maybe they have something like MS where they have good days and bad days and you happened to see them on a good day, or maybe the stress of shopping means that they'll be struggling by the time they get out.

Or maybe they're just faking it because LOL THEY STIL GOT LEGS
 
2014-05-12 12:20:48 AM

timelady: maram500: I'm a couple years away from being in a wheelchair (chronic, deteriorating pain, thanks), and having used a wheelchair a few times, here's the best advice I've got:

You aren't a grocery cart. You aren't magically capable of going longer distances. No ma'am/sir, I don't use this chair because I'm "lazy." Stop staring, please. Yes, I can still feel you poking my legs--stop it.

All that being said, it is still surprising how "nice" people can be when they see you have a handicap. I walk with a cane, and people go out of their way to open doors, clear narrow aisles, and so forth.

hey, snap. You are just a bit behind in my journey. Let me know if you ever want to talk - or anyone on here in similar place. Fark Cripps rule;)

timelady [at] gmail dot com - just label it dark cripps, as I drown in student email,s o check personal one less often atm.

/ do your assignments, by the due date, IT SAVES TIME, HONEST


you are awesome. that is all
 
2014-05-12 12:22:05 AM

Mister Peejay: o'really:
to be fair, about a third of all people using a disabled placard at any given time are not disabled. so there's a good chance someone's faking it, if they look like walking isn't a problem.

/drive disabled people around daily.
//grumble at all the healthy-looking folks taking the disabled spots.

At least where I live, you can qualify for a disabled placard if you have a respiratory problem that makes it difficult to walk more than 100 feet without resting.  A lot of people with heart problems LOOK fit, believe it or not.  Might even be able to move around pretty good for a minute or two.  Or maybe they have something like MS where they have good days and bad days and you happened to see them on a good day, or maybe the stress of shopping means that they'll be struggling by the time they get out.

Or maybe they're just faking it because LOL THEY STIL GOT LEGS


yes. i am aware of all that. thank you for stating the obvious.
 
2014-05-12 03:48:24 AM

StreetlightInTheGhetto: Why you NOT yell "Mein Führer! I can walk!" is beyond me.

 

OMFG THIS IS A THING OF MUCH BEAUTY:)
 
2014-05-12 03:52:11 AM
o'really:

you are awesome. that is all

Oh hell - I am just another Farker, mate:)

/  Not feeling so awesome atm - but tea and medications may fix it. Been a long day of students seeing the tsunami of deadline approaching;)))

// off to visit my amazing dad in hospital - my dad is battling cancer, and if you think I am awesome, damn he set the bar high:) If I was cancer, I would be damn scared about now.
 
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