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(TreeHugger)   If you really want to tell everyone you've built a green building, then it better be built on a foundation of hempcrete   (treehugger.com) divider line 9
    More: Strange, United States, sustainable design, revolutions  
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2788 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 May 2014 at 9:20 AM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



9 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-05-11 08:42:55 AM  
It's fire retardant, so it's not going to be as much fun to set ablaze as one hopes... :(
 
2014-05-11 09:22:50 AM  
I heard it works best on high rise buildings.
 
2014-05-11 09:45:29 AM  
I had some here a minute ago...
 
2014-05-11 09:51:42 AM  
This sounds like 80% of all freshmen writing projects: why weed should be legal

I'm all for legalization, this just seems an unlikely reason.
 
2014-05-11 10:09:53 AM  

CruJones: This sounds like 80% of all freshmen writing projects: why weed should be legal
I'm all for legalization, this just seems an unlikely reason.


It's not even weed... directly. it's the sub-movement that wants to make industrial hemp a cash crop. Fiber-rich cannabis plants have almost zero THC. Never mind that the only country which doesn't subsidize hemp is China due to (lack of) labor costs, that no American farmer would turn a dime in profit on an industrial growing level, and that sisal plants produce far more fibers per plant than cannabis sativa. But every so often, some moron pitches a new use for cannabis hemp that aims to sell it as a crop.

Hempcrete has been around for over ten years, when it was pitched to Congressional aids and a few agricultural bureaus in Hawaii. Not only is it supposed to be lighter, stronger, and cheaper than concrete... but you'd never have to worry about cracks in your foundations. Because whenever it rains, the hemp fibers absorb moisture and re-expand to their original sizes. That's right folks - your house will HEAL itself!

The original pitch was on '03 or '04. How many houses do you see made of Hempcrete a decade later?
 
2014-05-11 10:24:37 AM  

clkeagle: Hempcrete has been around for over ten years, when it was pitched to Congressional aids and a few agricultural bureaus in Hawaii. Not only is it supposed to be lighter, stronger, and cheaper than concrete... but you'd never have to worry about cracks in your foundations. Because whenever it rains, the hemp fibers absorb moisture and re-expand to their original sizes. That's right folks - your house will HEAL itself!


I don't know about this being stronger than typical concrete. According to the article, it's not even structural. They're basing their wall designs on a structural timber frame, so you'd frame your walls then use this as thermal mass. I think the fibers would be good for shrinkage crack control, but like typical fibermesh that's used in concrete slabs, it doesn't really add strength.

To add strength to concrete, you really need some sort of reinforcing bars that provide tensile capacity. For a green and cheap way to do this, instead of using steel bars, the US Army Corps of Engineers started using bamboo a while ago for bases in the South Pacific. I have a bamboo rebar design manual around here, they actually quantified it, so you know how to properly design with it. I've never done it, but always liked the idea.
 
2014-05-11 10:49:35 AM  

CruJones: This sounds like 80% of all freshmen writing projects: why weed should be legal

I'm all for legalization, this just seems an unlikely reason.


Weed and hemp are two different things.  The current hemp ban is more akin to banning Tomato plants because Tobacco is illegal, or banning all mushrooms because Psilocybin mushrooms are illegal.

The US is the only first world country that flat out bans hemp growth, and even most third world countries don't ban it.  Literally everyone else in the G20 allows the production of hemp.  While some people advocate for hemp legalization as a backdoor effort to legalize pot, I'd argue as many or more advocate for it on the basis that the US ban is poorly thought out and idiotic.
 
2014-05-11 10:55:25 AM  

clkeagle: CruJones: This sounds like 80% of all freshmen writing projects: why weed should be legal
I'm all for legalization, this just seems an unlikely reason.

It's not even weed... directly. it's the sub-movement that wants to make industrial hemp a cash crop. Fiber-rich cannabis plants have almost zero THC. Never mind that the only country which doesn't subsidize hemp is China due to (lack of) labor costs, that no American farmer would turn a dime in profit on an industrial growing level, and that sisal plants produce far more fibers per plant than cannabis sativa. But every so often, some moron pitches a new use for cannabis hemp that aims to sell it as a crop.

Hempcrete has been around for over ten years, when it was pitched to Congressional aids and a few agricultural bureaus in Hawaii. Not only is it supposed to be lighter, stronger, and cheaper than concrete... but you'd never have to worry about cracks in your foundations. Because whenever it rains, the hemp fibers absorb moisture and re-expand to their original sizes. That's right folks - your house will HEAL itself!


And in the climate I live in with a very robust freeze/thaw cycle, that would turn to dust within a decade.
 
2014-05-11 11:24:18 AM  
Al Gore, call your PR consultant

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