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(Time)   How Apple's HDTV turned into the Chinese Democracy of tech projects   (time.com) divider line 9
    More: Interesting, Apple HDTV, Apple, Chinese, Piper Jaffray, iTunes Music Store, CLSA, Gene Munster, Cult of Mac  
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1897 clicks; posted to Business » on 08 May 2014 at 3:46 PM (50 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2014-05-08 08:49:05 PM  
2 votes:
I've said it before and I'll say it again: the monitor part of a TV will outlast whatever "smart" features you include. Just give me a dumb monitor and let me plug whatever boxes I want into it.
2014-05-08 12:06:46 PM  
2 votes:
IMHO, the HDTV market at this point is too commoditized for it to make sense for Apple to deploy a smart HDTV.  I just do not see what they can bring to the market that other TV manufacturers, game consoles, and small streaming devices, including their own "Apple TV" can do...other than perhaps a pretty package...???  Unified functionality is not a selling feature to me.

Personally I see no compelling reason for an Apple HDTV.  Furthermore, I really hate the fact that it is impossible to buy a simple HD screen with no speakers, ZERO smart features, and nothing but a power cord and multiple HDMI inputs.  I (and I'm not alone) have invested a lot in my home entertainment system, and have multiple devices with multiple redundant applications (Apple TV/Roku, XBox/PlayStation, BluRay, etc).

A "fully loaded Smart, Feature Rich TV" does nothing for me other than cost more for features and functionality I do not need or want.

Finally, I find the idea of packaging all those features into one cohesive unit is concerning to me as if something goes bad on the separate board that runs the smart features dies, suddenly I may not be able to switch inputs or some other nonsense.

Feel free to oppose my opinion...

\I did not read the article in its entirety
2014-05-09 08:19:58 PM  
1 votes:

karmachameleon: The tablets before the iPad were garbage.


The tablet computer form factor (a 'thin' device that's mostly screen, and no built in keyboard) had been around decades before the iPad. Apple was at the right place to benefit from a bump in technology. They didn't really innovate anything that wasn't obvious to anyone working in the industry at the time, they were simply the first to come out with a device that used the next technological step in the natural evolution of the tablet PC form factor.

One of the reasons that previous tablets sucked was because of the touch screens (stylus computing, ew). We had to get away from the resistive touch screens and adopt capacitive touch screens. Apple didn't invent the capacitive touch screen, so they didn't innovate there either. Plus, we're looking at that old tech in retrospect, at the time, that shiat was considered state of the art.

Apple was just very good at taking current technologies and integrating them together in a single package well enough to appeal to the masses
(But then, IMO, they get stuck making minor useless revisions ... until the next big thing comes along).

As far as the general tablet design goes. All that happened is that tech improved, tablets got thinner and bezels got smaller.

Acorn NewsPad, 1994 - with ginormus beveling
atterer.org

MS Tablet, 2000 - MS was so far ahead of the game, then farked it all up.
static1.businessinsider.com

Fujitsu Stylistic, 2005 - looks more like a Wacom device than a tablet to me :P
www.tabletpc2.com

HP Compaq "tablet", 2006 - That looks like a modern tablet to me.
upload.wikimedia.org

Apple iPad, 2010
upload.wikimedia.org
// something else that strikes me as funny is how manufacturers now are doing hybrids again, remember those old school laptops with hinges :P
2014-05-09 06:55:05 PM  
1 votes:

Night Night Cream Puff: karmachameleon: They were the first to perfect those products

No. All those products still have problems, that's why they are constantly updated and "made better."

karmachameleon: and actually make them desirable to consumers.

Yes. They are masters of marketing.


lordargent: karmachameleon: They were the first to perfect those products and actually make them desirable to consumers.

One man's "perfect" is another man's "why would you do this and why won't you let me change it?"


Don't be pedants; you know what I mean.  The tablets before the iPad were garbage.  Whether you like it or not, Apple defined how a tablet should look and feel.  Ditto with the iPhone and iPod.  Whatever it is you use today as equivalents for those products, you're using something that was inspired by an Apple product.
2014-05-09 11:11:21 AM  
1 votes:
Some kid, in his 20s, was trying to tell me how "Apple TV is  going to be the next BIG THING".  This was two years ago, and he didn't like it when I laughed and explained that Apple has been touting Apple TV since the early 00s.  Kid then tells me I'm too old to understand technology.  I'm sorry, you snotty little shiat, but I've been in many flavors of I/T since the days you were filling your diaper.

/I've seen things
//Terrible things
///And things that never came to fruition
////Like Apple TV
2014-05-08 08:33:04 PM  
1 votes:
No Subby, Chinese Democracy was a real project that somebody was working on. Apple's HDTV is rumors based on speculation based on hearsay based on totally made up shiat.

Most of the features people talk about for an Apple HDTV could be added to the little Apple TV box, which can be sold to anybody with an HDTV. Why would Apple bother making their own TV set?
2014-05-08 04:18:33 PM  
1 votes:
Apple thrives where it enters the market first and dictates the norms of the category.  They did it with the iPod, the iPhone, and the iPad.  Each of those products revolutionized categories (mp3 players, smartphones, tablets) that either didn't exist or existed in clunkier forms that the public had no interest in.  Right now, it's hard to see how Apple could make their mark on the television market, even if they were to produce a high-end television.  Until they have something they think will change how people use TVs, they're going to sit the market out because if there's one thing Apple hates, it's being perceived as unoriginal.
2014-05-08 04:06:52 PM  
1 votes:

haemaker: Duke Nukem Forever.... oh wait, that did too.

We need new vaporware!


Half-Life 3.
2014-05-08 12:39:36 PM  
1 votes:

Endive Wombat: IMHO, the HDTV market at this point is too commoditized for it to make sense for Apple to deploy a smart HDTV.  I just do not see what they can bring to the market that other TV manufacturers, game consoles, and small streaming devices, including their own "Apple TV" can do...other than perhaps a pretty package...???  Unified functionality is not a selling feature to me.

Personally I see no compelling reason for an Apple HDTV.  Furthermore, I really hate the fact that it is impossible to buy a simple HD screen with no speakers, ZERO smart features, and nothing but a power cord and multiple HDMI inputs.  I (and I'm not alone) have invested a lot in my home entertainment system, and have multiple devices with multiple redundant applications (Apple TV/Roku, XBox/PlayStation, BluRay, etc).

A "fully loaded Smart, Feature Rich TV" does nothing for me other than cost more for features and functionality I do not need or want.

Finally, I find the idea of packaging all those features into one cohesive unit is concerning to me as if something goes bad on the separate board that runs the smart features dies, suddenly I may not be able to switch inputs or some other nonsense.

Feel free to oppose my opinion...

\I did not read the article in its entirety


Amen.

Sound comes out of the surround system.  The first thing I do is turn off the internal speakers because they SUCK.

Then I figure out which inputs go where into the TV and then program my Harmony Remote to switch inputs based on what I'm doing.  All the TV ever does is power on/off, send audio out to the surround system, and switch inputs based on what I'm doing.
 
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