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(The New York Times)   Why do not call lists don't work against pollsters. If this headline were to appear on the main page today, how happy would you be with reading it? Vote +1 in the link if you approve   (nytimes.com) divider line 15
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443 clicks; posted to Business » on 08 May 2014 at 2:06 PM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



15 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-05-08 02:21:32 PM  
This is why I always answer the questions... with lies.
 
2014-05-08 02:44:17 PM  
I'd be happy if do not call lists worked against the likes of Card Services.
 
2014-05-08 02:57:33 PM  
I don't mind exemptions for surveys. But for anyone else: How the fark does it work in your favor to respond to "I'm on the Do Not Call List" with "Neener, We're exempt!"

It's not a problem now that we're cell phone only. But, I've always responded to those claims of exemption with something like "Well, how's that exemption working for you?" Click...
 
2014-05-08 03:28:37 PM  

stewbert: I don't mind exemptions for surveys. But for anyone else: How the fark does it work in your favor to respond to "I'm on the Do Not Call List" with "Neener, We're exempt!"  It's not a problem now that we're cell phone only. But, I've always responded to those claims of exemption with something like "Well, how's that exemption working for you?" Click...


There was a thread a few days ago regarding door-to-door solicitation where the same subject came up.  Pollsters and religious advocates are legally exempt from honoring "no solicitation" signs.

But I have to imagine that most people who go through the trouble of enrolling in a solicitation blacklist or who post signs to the same effect don't really care if you're exempt.  They don't want to be bothered and will tell exempt parties to go away.  It seems like a waste of those exempt parties' resources to try and engage hostile customers.
 
2014-05-08 03:44:35 PM  
I never used to screen my calls, but now that I have Comcast triple play, I get the number on the TV.   The last time I actually chose to answer the phone I said "911 Emergency, this is a recorded line, do you require police, fire or medical?"    Obviously this is useless, but it made me feel better about getting out of my chair for a few minutes.

What is up with "Rachel from credit card services"???    I'll be damned if I can figure out what they are trying to sell me and you CANT get to a human to ask them!    She calls me multiple times per week!
 
2014-05-08 04:47:55 PM  
Home phone rings. (You know, "home phone". That ancient thing with a cord)
Me: Hello?
Them: Is this StopLurkListen? (Strike one and two. Not identifying themselves, and not saying "Please may I speak to")
Me: ... Please add me to your do not call list.
Me: Do you understand me?
Them: *click*

I swear, that's 97% of the calls I get on that stupid obsolete thing. I only have it in case one of our older relatives wants to contact us.

$40 a month just to screen stupid marketing calls in case it's an important family member calling.
 
2014-05-08 04:49:18 PM  
I forgot to add, the dead giveaway is the few seconds of pause between my "hello" and them speaking. I don't hang up because I don't end the call without a "please add me to your do not call list."
 
2014-05-08 04:59:53 PM  

Dinjiin: stewbert: I don't mind exemptions for surveys. But for anyone else: How the fark does it work in your favor to respond to "I'm on the Do Not Call List" with "Neener, We're exempt!"  It's not a problem now that we're cell phone only. But, I've always responded to those claims of exemption with something like "Well, how's that exemption working for you?" Click...

There was a thread a few days ago regarding door-to-door solicitation where the same subject came up.  Pollsters and religious advocates are legally exempt from honoring "no solicitation" signs.

But I have to imagine that most people who go through the trouble of enrolling in a solicitation blacklist or who post signs to the same effect don't really care if you're exempt.  They don't want to be bothered and will tell exempt parties to go away.  It seems like a waste of those exempt parties' resources to try and engage hostile customers.


I have a No Solicitation sign, too. Whenever anyone tries to claim an exemption to that, I ask why the fark they would think a guy with a no solicitation sign would want to talk to them. I usually finish with "fark you, and your exemption."

Seriously, the very people who do not want to be bothered are the people that will not have patience for your exemption.
 
2014-05-08 05:15:06 PM  

simusid: I never used to screen my calls, but now that I have Comcast triple play, I get the number on the TV.


What are you, some sort of shill for Comcast?

You know that Caller ID has been around for decades, right?

Fark Comcast and their triple play.
 
2014-05-08 06:07:20 PM  
I like to enthusiastically agree to go along with what ever sales pitch or questionnaire they are hawking, but only after I just go do something really quick...and then set the phone down next to the cat and walk away.
 
2014-05-08 07:20:34 PM  
Because they're exempt. What's the next big scoop for this guy, "why don't non-profits have to pay taxes"?

Dinjiin: stewbert: I don't mind exemptions for surveys. But for anyone else: How the fark does it work in your favor to respond to "I'm on the Do Not Call List" with "Neener, We're exempt!"  It's not a problem now that we're cell phone only. But, I've always responded to those claims of exemption with something like "Well, how's that exemption working for you?" Click...

There was a thread a few days ago regarding door-to-door solicitation where the same subject came up.  Pollsters and religious advocates are legally exempt from honoring "no solicitation" signs.

But I have to imagine that most people who go through the trouble of enrolling in a solicitation blacklist or who post signs to the same effect don't really care if you're exempt.  They don't want to be bothered and will tell exempt parties to go away.  It seems like a waste of those exempt parties' resources to try and engage hostile customers.


The exemptions are bullshiat. Surveys, religious nuts and politicians are *precisely* why I'd want to be on a "do not call" or "no solicitation" list.
 
2014-05-08 10:34:20 PM  

Harvey Manfrenjensenjen: Because they're exempt. What's the next big scoop for this guy, "why don't non-profits have to pay taxes"?

Dinjiin: stewbert: I don't mind exemptions for surveys. But for anyone else: How the fark does it work in your favor to respond to "I'm on the Do Not Call List" with "Neener, We're exempt!"  It's not a problem now that we're cell phone only. But, I've always responded to those claims of exemption with something like "Well, how's that exemption working for you?" Click...

There was a thread a few days ago regarding door-to-door solicitation where the same subject came up.  Pollsters and religious advocates are legally exempt from honoring "no solicitation" signs.

But I have to imagine that most people who go through the trouble of enrolling in a solicitation blacklist or who post signs to the same effect don't really care if you're exempt.  They don't want to be bothered and will tell exempt parties to go away.  It seems like a waste of those exempt parties' resources to try and engage hostile customers.

The exemptions are bullshiat. Surveys, religious nuts and politicians are *precisely* why I'd want to be on a "do not call" or "no solicitation" list.


I hear claymores work really really well.
 
2014-05-09 01:25:55 AM  
The last survey that called here found out I was an 80 year old hispanic female. Giving me lots of pushbutton options may not be a good idea. Cold calling vendors where I work get the message very quickly.

However, I'd forgotten about the few surviving in person ones. I think the fun part will be to see how exempt they are to a "No Trespassing" sign and a 911 call.

/spammers & UCE get similar. I block sending domains for my work domain
//the lawn is wooded and covered by active IR, you may want to get off it quickly
 
2014-05-09 02:17:35 AM  
I have no credit cards whatsoever, and never have, so I am always greatly puzzled when the "card services" people tell me my account is fine, etc.

However, I have no qualms about connecting myself to a live person at "card services" for the pleasure of saying something unspeakably vile and rude.
 
2014-05-09 01:03:56 PM  

Harvey Manfrenjensenjen: The exemptions are bullshiat. Surveys, religious nuts and politicians are *precisely* why I'd want to be on a "do not call" or "no solicitation" list.


The holes are there as a result of the First Amendment; if those exemptions weren't there, the whole law could end up being struck down, and then you'd also be inundated with sales calls from the idiots trying to sell you swampland time share apartments.
 
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