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(Bloomberg)   How to change a $5 bill into a $100? Working mother shows that it's entirely possible with degreaser, a toothbrush and an HP printer ... according to her court appointed attorney   (bloomberg.com) divider line 67
    More: Interesting, Working Mother, Hewlett-Packard, simplicity, toothbrushes, emerging technologies, Bureau of Engraving and Printing, ink-jet printers, hair dryers  
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3306 clicks; posted to Business » on 08 May 2014 at 2:54 PM (19 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-05-08 11:24:30 AM
Any business dumb enough to accept counterfeit bills printed on a friggen Inkjet deserves to get fleeced. There's no way an Inkjet could accurately reproduce the color shifting ink or textures on a fifty or a hundred, and anyone accepting big bills without checking the watermark or security features on them is an idiot.
 
2014-05-08 01:01:32 PM

spman: Any business dumb enough to accept counterfeit bills printed on a friggen Inkjet deserves to get fleeced. There's no way an Inkjet could accurately reproduce the color shifting ink or textures on a fifty or a hundred, and anyone accepting big bills without checking the watermark or security features on them is an idiot.


I saw a fake $50 just last week.
The real giveaway is that $50s are used much often that $20s or $100s.
The printing looks great. Because it is printed on real currency paper, they feel great.
And why would their be shifting ink if they are copying an older bill?

That being said, the store caught the fake bill right away and the moron fled.
 
2014-05-08 02:15:08 PM
ok, there's no way she was able to print enough money to buy the ink cartridges she'd need to print more money.
 
2014-05-08 03:00:00 PM
Was hoping it was more like she spent $5 on sexy underwear and then was paid to have sex with a stranger for $100.

That would have been cool. The real story is just lame.
 
2014-05-08 03:05:45 PM
The economics of fake money is intriguing.  How much is a fake $100 bill worth?
 
2014-05-08 03:15:31 PM

van1ty: The economics of fake money is intriguing.  How much is a fake $100 bill worth?


10 years.
 
2014-05-08 03:23:20 PM
The mobsters always say that the best way to make money is to make money.
 
2014-05-08 03:26:38 PM

serial_crusher: ok, there's no way she was able to print enough money to buy the ink cartridges she'd need to print more money.


I need to buy new cartridges for my Officejet, so I'm getting a kick out of this thread.
 
2014-05-08 03:31:13 PM
Don't most modern color printers include a watermark of the printer's serial number?
 
2014-05-08 03:34:22 PM
FTA: "Brice, who pleaded guilty to counterfeiting last month in federal court..."

Why is the federal prosecutor against stimulus? Does he care nothing about the economy?
 
2014-05-08 03:37:35 PM
Is this a story about Drew?  and are you telling me there are only 20 Total Farkers?   wow.
 
2014-05-08 03:46:22 PM

Dinjiin: Don't most modern color printers include a watermark of the printer's serial number?


Doesn't matter if you bought it at a garage sale.
 
2014-05-08 03:57:06 PM

DjangoStonereaver: serial_crusher: ok, there's no way she was able to print enough money to buy the ink cartridges she'd need to print more money.

I need to buy new cartridges for my Officejet, so I'm getting a kick out of this thread.


---Which brings to mind the question:  How much do the counterfeiters spend on ink?  If you use the generic stuff that comes in refills, its cheaper and crappier.  If you use real name brand ink, there goes your profit on the fake money...
 
2014-05-08 03:58:41 PM
...these highly efficient "counterfeiting mills" can more easily escape detection by U.S. authorities and even operate with the backing of corrupt governments.

Are they talking about the Fed?
 
2014-05-08 04:27:25 PM
CREDIT CARDS TO THE RESCUE!  Oh crap - who stole my identity?
BITCOIN TO THE RESCUE!    Oh crap - who hacked my wallet?!?!?!
 
2014-05-08 04:29:41 PM

Dinjiin: Don't most modern color printers include a watermark of the printer's serial number?


It isn't always the serial number but there is usually some kind of identifier or marking if the printer detects it is printing money, if it prints at all.
 
2014-05-08 04:29:57 PM

namatad: spman: Any business dumb enough to accept counterfeit bills printed on a friggen Inkjet deserves to get fleeced. There's no way an Inkjet could accurately reproduce the color shifting ink or textures on a fifty or a hundred, and anyone accepting big bills without checking the watermark or security features on them is an idiot.

I saw a fake $50 just last week.
The real giveaway is that $50s are used much often that $20s or $100s.
The printing looks great. Because it is printed on real currency paper, they feel great.
And why would their be shifting ink if they are copying an older bill?

That being said, the store caught the fake bill right away and the moron fled.


Yup, I've caught a few of them over the years and they look exceptional. Watermark and the tag band are always the key to look for. Also, there's a few folks that copy bills from 20+ years ago, before the tag bands and watermarks were used.  One of my old Asset Protection managers demonstrated that those bill scanners only have about a 50% accuracy in detecting counterfeit bills, so we always used the pen and then visual ID.
 
2014-05-08 04:54:03 PM
I remember seeing something about how companies that make scanners and printers were developing some tech with the Treasury that when you tried to scan a bill it would show up distorted in some form like with checks. But you could probably overcome that with some decent photography equipment.
 
2014-05-08 04:57:45 PM
SPMAN, do you really expect a clerk making minimum or a waitress making sub-minimum to put cash under a microscope to inspect it? At most, they will mark it with one of those so-called anti-counterfeit pens that make a black mark with cheap paper that contains starch. If the mark is yellow, the bill must be good. That is all they are trained to do, and even that is a lot to ask of someone making peanuts.

Those pens can make a black mark on good cash if it was handled at a bakery or another business that uses a lot of flour. It would be contaminated with starch.
 
2014-05-08 05:03:44 PM
Some of the comments below that article are amazing. Can someone who speaks Derp, please translate?

"I always feel silly checking to see if money is "real" at work, because really, it's truly all counterfeit."

"The real irony is that all current US dollars are counterfeit and illegal."

"The woman copying currency did nothing wrong, but tried to free & help herself from the government trap of debt servitude slavery of a worthless fiat currency and the government brute force insurance of a force labor income tax. "

"We need to wake up the rest of the SHEEPLE and make sure they understand WHO CREATED the FED in 1913 and the IRS and why they IMPOSE a INCOME TAX and how CRIMINAL it is to LIVE OFF US LIKE PARASITES and then ACT AS IF THEY ARE BETTER and SMARTER.... WE NEED TO CRUSH THEM NOW!!!"
 
2014-05-08 05:09:41 PM
"We need to wake up the rest of the SHEEPLE

NOOO! DON'T WAKE THE SHEEPLE! YOU WILL REGRET IT!
 
2014-05-08 05:28:48 PM

uncoveror: SPMAN, do you really expect a clerk making minimum or a waitress making sub-minimum to put cash under a microscope to inspect it? At most, they will mark it with one of those so-called anti-counterfeit pens that make a black mark with cheap paper that contains starch. If the mark is yellow, the bill must be good. That is all they are trained to do, and even that is a lot to ask of someone making peanuts.

Those pens can make a black mark on good cash if it was handled at a bakery or another business that uses a lot of flour. It would be contaminated with starch.


James Randi tells a story about messing with people by basically ironing bills with spray starch.
 
2014-05-08 05:31:32 PM
You could use an Epson, but they start printing all messed up after 1000 prints.

/Closer to the truth than you might know... yes, Epson printers are programmed to basically self-destruct.
 
2014-05-08 05:38:31 PM

AspectRatio: Some of the comments below that article are amazing. Can someone who speaks Derp, please translate?

"I always feel silly checking to see if money is "real" at work, because really, it's truly all counterfeit."

"The real irony is that all current US dollars are counterfeit and illegal."

"The woman copying currency did nothing wrong, but tried to free & help herself from the government trap of debt servitude slavery of a worthless fiat currency and the government brute force insurance of a force labor income tax. "

"We need to wake up the rest of the SHEEPLE and make sure they understand WHO CREATED the FED in 1913 and the IRS and why they IMPOSE a INCOME TAX and how CRIMINAL it is to LIVE OFF US LIKE PARASITES and then ACT AS IF THEY ARE BETTER and SMARTER.... WE NEED TO CRUSH THEM NOW!!!"


Usually stuff like this comes back to the Jews.  So are the Jews protecting us from awakening the Sheeple?  Shouldn't we be thanking them?
 
2014-05-08 06:16:27 PM
Why not use $1 bills as blanks instead of $5 bills?
 
2014-05-08 06:28:50 PM

Hassan Ben Sobr: Why not use $1 bills as blanks instead of $5 bills?


$1 blanks don't have security strips. Everything larger does.
 
2014-05-08 06:57:12 PM

lewismarktwo: Dinjiin: Don't most modern color printers include a watermark of the printer's serial number?

Doesn't matter if you bought it at a garage sale.


I've heard this for years, but never seen anything credible.  I've not heard of it being a watermark, but rather some really tiny (not visible to the naked eye) identifier.

I don't believe it.

For one thing, my inkjet doesn't have the resolution for this.  Even if it does and I just don't realize it, there's no way the store where I bought this tracked which printer I bought.  I picked it up off a shelf with other printers just like it and paid for it.

I did use a credit card, but I wouldn't have been turned down if I had paid cash.

The only use such an identifier could have is if they had reason to believe you were the source and raided your house and matched the identifier to your printer.
 
2014-05-08 07:06:01 PM

spman: Any business dumb enough to accept counterfeit bills printed on a friggen Inkjet deserves to get fleeced. There's no way an Inkjet could accurately reproduce the color shifting ink or textures on a fifty or a hundred, and anyone accepting big bills without checking the watermark or security features on them is an idiot.


You give the funny money to the weed man across town and then sell that weed for real money
 
2014-05-08 07:29:24 PM

gfid: lewismarktwo: Dinjiin: Don't most modern color printers include a watermark of the printer's serial number?

Doesn't matter if you bought it at a garage sale.

I've heard this for years, but never seen anything credible.  I've not heard of it being a watermark, but rather some really tiny (not visible to the naked eye) identifier.

I don't believe it.

For one thing, my inkjet doesn't have the resolution for this.  Even if it does and I just don't realize it, there's no way the store where I bought this tracked which printer I bought.  I picked it up off a shelf with other printers just like it and paid for it.

I did use a credit card, but I wouldn't have been turned down if I had paid cash.

The only use such an identifier could have is if they had reason to believe you were the source and raided your house and matched the identifier to your printer.



Color laser printers have them, not inkjets AFAIK. It isn't a serial number printed out in very tiny characters, it's encoded in an arrangement of tiny light-colored dots. I wouldn't think great resolution would be required.

I doubt that info would lead them to your door unless you were particularly foolish (like, you had it shipped to you by Amazon), but it might point them in the right direction unless you're particularly careful for an amateur - that is, they'd know which store you bought it from, or maybe the guy who had the yard sale had previously sent his info to HP, or whatever, so they might be able tolocalize their investigation or get a description/image of you or something on that order, even if it isn't immediately clear who you are. The timestamp might be useful too. And yeah, being able to positively ID the printer when they locate it would be useful.

/google "printer steganography"
 
2014-05-08 07:52:10 PM
Her money's no more or less fake than the $5s she used as source material.
 
2014-05-08 08:07:54 PM
UV light.

You can get these cheaply from a party store and mount them near/under the registers. Employees generally can see bright pretty colors as the strips fluoresce, and easily memorize which color goes with which denomination with a helpful nearby chart.

Make it visible to customers and people will stop passing fakes.

If there is a counterfeit that can pass a UV test, then you don't need to worry about it.
 
2014-05-08 08:20:42 PM

Wake Up Sheeple: UV light.

You can get these cheaply from a party store and mount them near/under the registers. Employees generally can see bright pretty colors as the strips fluoresce, and easily memorize which color goes with which denomination with a helpful nearby chart.

Make it visible to customers and people will stop passing fakes.

If there is a counterfeit that can pass a UV test, then you don't need to worry about it.


I don't think you want to mount a UV light under the register at any business where teenagers work.
 
2014-05-08 08:35:32 PM

ChrisDe: Wake Up Sheeple: UV light.

You can get these cheaply from a party store and mount them near/under the registers. Employees generally can see bright pretty colors as the strips fluoresce, and easily memorize which color goes with which denomination with a helpful nearby chart.

Make it visible to customers and people will stop passing fakes.

If there is a counterfeit that can pass a UV test, then you don't need to worry about it.

I don't think you want to mount a UV light under the register at any business where teenagers work.


....And why not? Is this some obscure joke?
 
2014-05-08 08:48:11 PM

Wake Up Sheeple: ChrisDe: Wake Up Sheeple: UV light.

You can get these cheaply from a party store and mount them near/under the registers. Employees generally can see bright pretty colors as the strips fluoresce, and easily memorize which color goes with which denomination with a helpful nearby chart.

Make it visible to customers and people will stop passing fakes.

If there is a counterfeit that can pass a UV test, then you don't need to worry about it.

I don't think you want to mount a UV light under the register at any business where teenagers work.

....And why not? Is this some obscure joke?


What, besides money strips, fluoresces under UV light? Correlation: What that fluoresces under UV light might be associated with hormone-driven teenagers?
 
2014-05-08 08:58:22 PM
untaken_name:
What, besides money strips, fluoresces under UV light? Correlation: What that fluoresces under UV light might be associated with hormone-driven teenagers?

You think about people's pants too much... Besides, what you're talking about would encourage them to take a shower and wear clean pants to work. Win/Win.

BTW, I've a feeling that you get your information from TV crime-shows. Set up a UV light and see what glows and what doesn't glow.
 
2014-05-08 10:38:31 PM

Wake Up Sheeple: untaken_name:
What, besides money strips, fluoresces under UV light? Correlation: What that fluoresces under UV light might be associated with hormone-driven teenagers?
You think about people's pants too much... Besides, what you're talking about would encourage them to take a shower and wear clean pants to work. Win/Win.
BTW, I've a feeling that you get your information from TV crime-shows. Set up a UV light and see what glows and what doesn't glow.


That's a bingo. The Alternate Light Sources used for those purposes aren't remotely the same things as currency-check UV lights.Even with an ALS you aren't going to see anything without filtered glasses/goggles...and even then, you'll see just as much trace sweat, saliva, and mucus as you will genital secretions. They're nearly indistinguishable under an ALS.

No matter what h done in your bed or who you've done it with - the brightest spots seen under an ALS will always be the pillows.And for random fun - the second brightest spot in hotel rooms is usually the wall right above the trash can. Apparently everyone in the world loves to throw bank-shots with their used kleenex.
 
2014-05-08 10:43:28 PM

Wake Up Sheeple: ChrisDe: Wake Up Sheeple: UV light.

You can get these cheaply from a party store and mount them near/under the registers. Employees generally can see bright pretty colors as the strips fluoresce, and easily memorize which color goes with which denomination with a helpful nearby chart.

Make it visible to customers and people will stop passing fakes.

If there is a counterfeit that can pass a UV test, then you don't need to worry about it.

I don't think you want to mount a UV light under the register at any business where teenagers work.

....And why not? Is this some obscure joke?


SEMEN STAINS EVERYWHERE
 
2014-05-08 10:45:31 PM
Untaken_name, you got Farked. You see, it's absolutely unforgivable to make an off the cuff, irreverent joke. Every last detail of every last word you type absolutely must be 100% precise, accurate, and factually correct. Any minor deviation in spelling, other than a good high brow pun, any grammatical mistake unless quoting slang, and any statement without at least 3 corroborating citations from credible online sources is simply unacceptable. Hopefully, the parade of pedantry is enough of a warning for you this time, but be on notice. The next time we will not be so forgiving.
 
2014-05-09 12:16:31 AM
She should claim its economic stimulus by a quasi-governmental entity.

Works for the Fed.
 
2014-05-09 12:24:59 AM
Provided nobody knows it was originally a fiver, I don't how this is criminal.   Just an extremely small scale version of what the fed does for central banks every month.
 
2014-05-09 12:26:53 AM

AspectRatio: Some of the comments below that article are amazing. Can someone who speaks Derp, please translate?

"I always feel silly checking to see if money is "real" at work, because really, it's truly all counterfeit."

"The real irony is that all current US dollars are counterfeit and illegal."

"The woman copying currency did nothing wrong, but tried to free & help herself from the government trap of debt servitude slavery of a worthless fiat currency and the government brute force insurance of a force labor income tax. "



I see you are still asleep. Time to wake up!
 
2014-05-09 01:09:57 AM

RoyFokker'sGhost: namatad: spman: Any business dumb enough to accept counterfeit bills printed on a friggen Inkjet deserves to get fleeced. There's no way an Inkjet could accurately reproduce the color shifting ink or textures on a fifty or a hundred, and anyone accepting big bills without checking the watermark or security features on them is an idiot.

I saw a fake $50 just last week.
The real giveaway is that $50s are used much often that $20s or $100s.
The printing looks great. Because it is printed on real currency paper, they feel great.
And why would their be shifting ink if they are copying an older bill?

That being said, the store caught the fake bill right away and the moron fled.

Yup, I've caught a few of them over the years and they look exceptional. Watermark and the tag band are always the key to look for. Also, there's a few folks that copy bills from 20+ years ago, before the tag bands and watermarks were used.  One of my old Asset Protection managers demonstrated that those bill scanners only have about a 50% accuracy in detecting counterfeit bills, so we always used the pen and then visual ID.


I don't think the pen would have worked in this case due to the fact she was altering a real bill which then made it counterfeit.
 
2014-05-09 01:10:50 AM
Interesting how the article didn't sanitize her techniques like they often do. If I had a deathwish, I'd be tempted to try this at a strip club.
 
2014-05-09 01:22:15 AM

47 is the new 42: RoyFokker'sGhost: namatad: spman: Any business dumb enough to accept counterfeit bills printed on a friggen Inkjet deserves to get fleeced. There's no way an Inkjet could accurately reproduce the color shifting ink or textures on a fifty or a hundred, and anyone accepting big bills without checking the watermark or security features on them is an idiot.

I saw a fake $50 just last week.
The real giveaway is that $50s are used much often that $20s or $100s.
The printing looks great. Because it is printed on real currency paper, they feel great.
And why would their be shifting ink if they are copying an older bill?

That being said, the store caught the fake bill right away and the moron fled.

Yup, I've caught a few of them over the years and they look exceptional. Watermark and the tag band are always the key to look for. Also, there's a few folks that copy bills from 20+ years ago, before the tag bands and watermarks were used.  One of my old Asset Protection managers demonstrated that those bill scanners only have about a 50% accuracy in detecting counterfeit bills, so we always used the pen and then visual ID.

I don't think the pen would have worked in this case due to the fact she was altering a real bill which then made it counterfeit.


Not here, but sometimes counterfeiters will bleach $1 & $5, then print $50 and $100 over the bill paper. The pen says it's okay, but the watermark and tag band still give the original bill type.
 
2014-05-09 01:27:42 AM
There are also the watermarks, slightly magnetic ink, strips that illuminate under UV light, and white bars on the reverse that are visible under infrared light. The average cashier would only be able to check the first one, but I doubt they even do that very often.
 
2014-05-09 02:04:04 AM

van1ty: The economics of fake money is intriguing.  How much is a fake $100 bill worth?


I used to be in a union full of wannabe crooked dudes...a guy used to sell pretty good fake $20s for $5 each.
 
2014-05-09 03:19:12 AM
Yeah, I don't need somebody showing up for me with this.
i62.tinypic.com
 
2014-05-09 08:07:30 AM
It only works with old $5's though. Not ones with the pink 5 on the back. The old $5's will pass the iodine pen test. Still farked on watermark though.
 
2014-05-09 09:05:12 AM
Mom discovers one weird trick! The IRS hates her!
 
2014-05-09 09:49:53 AM
This all seems like alot of work. scrubbing, rubbing, bleaching, printers etc...

take 1k and invest in cattle futures..... poooooffff it turns into 100,000 in 10 months, hit the easy button.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hillary_Rodham_cattle_futures_controver sy

www.washingtonpost.com
 
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