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(Space.com)   The Illustris Project brings us one step closer to helping Carl Sagan make an apple pie from scratch   (space.com) divider line 17
    More: Cool, universe, evolution, galaxy formation, Baryons, physical changes, Spiral Galaxy, Big Bang theory, solar masses  
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1743 clicks; posted to Geek » on 08 May 2014 at 9:58 AM (11 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



17 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-05-08 03:07:18 AM
awesome video.  kinda makes me wish I was back in my acid days.  I would have been so amazed
 
2014-05-08 09:06:02 AM
Cool.  Nice combination of music and visuals.  I was waiting for the Vorlons to attach the Shadows.
 
2014-05-08 10:06:27 AM
I always thought that line was rubbish. It reeks of an attempt to sound grandiose and intelligent but falling flat, like the crap eastern mystics, or stoned teenagers, peddle in an attempt to sound philosophical.

Everything else was great, though. Although the Apple pie was way too crumbly.
 
2014-05-08 10:46:34 AM
24.media.tumblr.com
 
2014-05-08 10:47:29 AM

Slaxl: I always thought that line was rubbish. It reeks of an attempt to sound grandiose and intelligent but falling flat, like the crap eastern mystics, or stoned teenagers, peddle in an attempt to sound philosophical.

Everything else was great, though. Although the Apple pie was way too crumbly.


Oh, it was a fine bit of dialogue- everyone remembers it, and it was the introduction of a segment about dividing something up until you get to the smallest, indivisible piece of matter. Sagan was all about poetic melodrama, it's what made him the scientific spokesperson for a generation. I love Neil deGrasse Tyson, too - also a very charismatic cheerleader for science, but Neil is not poetic. I don't recall a phrase or analogy or allusion of Neil's that is as memorable or beautiful as any of Sagan's prose.

All my humble opinion, of course. But watching and comparing the different Cosmos episodes, the difference is Neil instructs, and Sagan sings.

"No words... They should have sent a poet" was written by Sagan. I find this hilarious and doubly ironic.
 
2014-05-08 10:51:55 AM

StopLurkListen: Slaxl: I always thought that line was rubbish. It reeks of an attempt to sound grandiose and intelligent but falling flat, like the crap eastern mystics, or stoned teenagers, peddle in an attempt to sound philosophical.

Everything else was great, though. Although the Apple pie was way too crumbly.

Oh, it was a fine bit of dialogue- everyone remembers it, and it was the introduction of a segment about dividing something up until you get to the smallest, indivisible piece of matter. Sagan was all about poetic melodrama, it's what made him the scientific spokesperson for a generation. I love Neil deGrasse Tyson, too - also a very charismatic cheerleader for science, but Neil is not poetic. I don't recall a phrase or analogy or allusion of Neil's that is as memorable or beautiful as any of Sagan's prose.

All my humble opinion, of course. But watching and comparing the different Cosmos episodes, the difference is Neil instructs, and Sagan sings.

"No words... They should have sent a poet" was written by Sagan. I find this hilarious and doubly ironic.


You're farming some free range truth there.
 
2014-05-08 10:53:54 AM
From TFA:

Illustris, is special because it covers a wide area - a cosmic cube that is about 350 million light-years on each side

www.flickeringmyth.com

"Machen, bitte...."
 
2014-05-08 11:05:15 AM
That cosmic web looked an awful lot like a network of neutrons.
[Insert rambling pseudo-scientific nonsense here]
 
2014-05-08 11:19:17 AM
That was amazing. What are the explosions? Gamma ray bursts?
 
2014-05-08 11:54:42 AM
news.bbcimg.co.uk

I've seen it. It's rubbish.
 
2014-05-08 11:58:21 AM

StopLurkListen: Slaxl: I always thought that line was rubbish. It reeks of an attempt to sound grandiose and intelligent but falling flat, like the crap eastern mystics, or stoned teenagers, peddle in an attempt to sound philosophical.

Everything else was great, though. Although the Apple pie was way too crumbly.

Oh, it was a fine bit of dialogue- everyone remembers it, and it was the introduction of a segment about dividing something up until you get to the smallest, indivisible piece of matter. Sagan was all about poetic melodrama, it's what made him the scientific spokesperson for a generation. I love Neil deGrasse Tyson, too - also a very charismatic cheerleader for science, but Neil is not poetic. I don't recall a phrase or analogy or allusion of Neil's that is as memorable or beautiful as any of Sagan's prose.

All my humble opinion, of course. But watching and comparing the different Cosmos episodes, the difference is Neil instructs, and Sagan sings.

"No words... They should have sent a poet" was written by Sagan. I find this hilarious and doubly ironic.



In the Cosmos remake, NdGT is trying to change the dialogue of the country; he's talking to the ignorant/undecided middle ground in an effort to hit back against pseudoscience and religion.


There's a reason why a lot of the more "controversial" bits of the new Cosmos are cartoons and morality tales.


In Sagan's original Cosmos, he was celebrating the triumph of human inquiry and his own small part in advancing it; he wanted to share the beauty of science and discovery with whoever would listen.
 
2014-05-08 12:29:16 PM
static.fjcdn.com
 
2014-05-08 01:20:00 PM

DjangoStonereaver: From TFA:

Illustris, is special because it covers a wide area - a cosmic cube that is about 350 million light-years on each side

[www.flickeringmyth.com image 595x270]

"Machen, bitte...."


www.timecube.com
 
2014-05-08 01:22:06 PM

SafetyThird: [static.fjcdn.com image 780x591]


fark that.  I'll just get a Marie Callender's from the grocery store. :P
 
2014-05-08 01:59:26 PM

Jubeebee: In the Cosmos remake, NdGT is trying to change the dialogue of the country; he's talking to the ignorant/undecided middle ground in an effort to hit back against pseudoscience and religion.

There's a reason why a lot of the more "controversial" bits of the new Cosmos are cartoons and morality tales.

In Sagan's original Cosmos, he was celebrating the triumph of human inquiry and his own small part in advancing it; he wanted to share the beauty of science and discovery with whoever would listen.


Well put.  Hadn't thought of it this way, but I think you nailed it.  Kinda sad that it's come to this.
 
2014-05-08 02:31:34 PM

make me some tea: That was amazing. What are the explosions? Gamma ray bursts?


Radio-mode feedback from active galactic nuclei after their initial quasars have burned themselves out, so think bigger and slower. Much bigger and much slower.

I'm not an astrophysicist by any means, and this is still relatively recent research, but here's the grossly oversimplified/handwaving version of the story:

The red/green/blue display in the video that best shows off the effect is the map of gas temperature. The flickering effect (green/blue at the center of the galaxy clusters themselves) is indicative of radiative/quasar mode: early in the life of a galactic cluster, lots of cold gas falls into the central black holes of the galaxies involved, producing quasars, which in turn put out such a stupendous amount of radiation that they eventually drive off most of the infalling gas that produced the quasars in the first place. Without this source of energy, why doesn't everything just cool off and re-condense? Because, particularly for the most massive galaxies in the clusters, there's still enough hot gas falling into their black holes to keep things at a simmering boil; this is the kinetic/radio mode of feedback that keeps the gas around the clusters warm: in the very largest galaxies, enough matter continues to fall into the central black hole to produce relativistic radio jets that heat the intracluster medium and continue to produce shockwaves that form the warm bubbles around the clusters of galaxies. A side effect of this heating is that big elliptical galaxies are red: whatever gas remains is still unable to form into young, hot, short-lived blue stars, leaving only older, smaller, and redder ones remain for us to observe.

The paper that introduced the hypothesis: "The many lives of active galactic nuclei: cooling flows, black holes and the luminosities and colours of galaxies" (Groton, et. al, 2006)

A more recent paper with some pictures of actual bubbles as observed: Observational Evidence of AGN Feedback (Fabian, 2012)

A vastly more accessible article from 2014 concerning recent Herschel observations on radio-mode feedback and "red/dead" phenomenon in large ellipticals.
 
2014-05-08 02:48:35 PM

Twilight Farkle: make me some tea: That was amazing. What are the explosions? Gamma ray bursts?

Radio-mode feedback from active galactic nuclei after their initial quasars have burned themselves out, so think bigger and slower. Much bigger and much slower.

I'm not an astrophysicist by any means, and this is still relatively recent research, but here's the grossly oversimplified/handwaving version of the story:

The red/green/blue display in the video that best shows off the effect is the map of gas temperature. The flickering effect (green/blue at the center of the galaxy clusters themselves) is indicative of radiative/quasar mode: early in the life of a galactic cluster, lots of cold gas falls into the central black holes of the galaxies involved, producing quasars, which in turn put out such a stupendous amount of radiation that they eventually drive off most of the infalling gas that produced the quasars in the first place. Without this source of energy, why doesn't everything just cool off and re-condense? Because, particularly for the most massive galaxies in the clusters, there's still enough hot gas falling into their black holes to keep things at a simmering boil; this is the kinetic/radio mode of feedback that keeps the gas around the clusters warm: in the very largest galaxies, enough matter continues to fall into the central black hole to produce relativistic radio jets that heat the intracluster medium and continue to produce shockwaves that form the warm bubbles around the clusters of galaxies. A side effect of this heating is that big elliptical galaxies are red: whatever gas remains is still unable to form into young, hot, short-lived blue stars, leaving only older, smaller, and redder ones remain for us to observe.

The paper that introduced the hypothesis: "The many lives of active galactic nuclei: cooling flows, black holes and the luminosities and colours of galaxies" (Groton, et. al, 2006)

A more recent paper with some pictures of actual bubbles as observed: O ...


Very interesting. Thanks for that.
 
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