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(Yahoo)   If you were at a job interview with the company's CEO, could you answer this trick math question?   (finance.yahoo.com) divider line 638
    More: Stupid, CEO, tricks, math questions  
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28277 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 May 2014 at 7:05 AM (19 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



638 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-05-08 01:27:17 AM
"They don't have to get the exact right answer, which is a nickel, but  I want to see them at least have a thought process behind it. "

Really? No wonder the Chinese are taking over.
 
2014-05-08 01:47:34 AM
Five cents.
 
2014-05-08 02:08:14 AM
That's a trick question?

It's farking addition/subtraction.

Damn, we're farked as a country, aren't we?
 
2014-05-08 02:38:06 AM

Emposter: That's a trick question?

It's farking addition/subtraction.

Damn, we're farked as a country, aren't we?


I would disagree. It's actually called conjunction bias and a vast majority will answer incorrectly.
 
FNG [TotalFark]
2014-05-08 02:40:47 AM
I still don't get it and I'm a reasonably intelligent person.

Granted, I don't know what the fox says either.
 
2014-05-08 02:49:22 AM

FNG: I still don't get it and I'm a reasonably intelligent person.

Granted, I don't know what the fox says either.


1.10 = nail + hammer
hammer = nail + 1
1.10 = nail + (nail + 1)
1.10 = 2*nail + 1
.10 = 2*nail
.05 = nail

Or just guess and estimate from 10c per nail and then work your way down until nail + nail + 1 = 1.10.
 
2014-05-08 02:55:18 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: FNG: I still don't get it and I'm a reasonably intelligent person.

Granted, I don't know what the fox says either.

1.10 = nail + hammer
hammer = nail + 1
1.10 = nail + (nail + 1)
1.10 = 2*nail + 1
.10 = 2*nail
.05 = nail


Damn...I was writing a post about how your way was unnecessarily complicated, then half way through explaining the way I did it in my head I realized it was exactly the way you wrote it out.
 
2014-05-08 07:08:52 AM
If I didn't panic and actually thought about it for a second, yeah
 
2014-05-08 07:10:49 AM

Emposter: That's a trick question?

It's farking addition/subtraction.

Damn, we're farked as a country, aren't we?


Yes.
 
2014-05-08 07:12:27 AM
It's a trick question only if you're 12.
 
2014-05-08 07:13:59 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: FNG: I still don't get it and I'm a reasonably intelligent person.

Granted, I don't know what the fox says either.

1.10 = nail + hammer
hammer = nail + 1
1.10 = nail + (nail + 1)
1.10 = 2*nail + 1
.10 = 2*nail
.05 = nail

Or just guess and estimate from 10c per nail and then work your way down until nail + nail + 1 = 1.10.


I just subtracted $1 from $1.10, and split the difference.
 
2014-05-08 07:15:36 AM
The correct response: the price of a nail is the same as the number of buttons you have to have open on your shirt to look manly, Mr. Ceo.
 
2014-05-08 07:15:41 AM
FTFA: "H e also asks tricky questions, h e  says,  to see how the candidate may perform on the job."

Does the CEO of Yahoo ask any trick questions for copy editors?
 
2014-05-08 07:16:03 AM
Bullshiat. He didn't say what size nail. How does he know that the nail doesn't actually cost more than the hammer?
And if he can buy a hammer for $1.05, I want to know where he shops.

/stupid CEO
//Probably never swung a hammer in his life.
 
2014-05-08 07:16:58 AM

Emposter: That's a trick question?

My reaction as well.  Anyone who thinks that's a trick question deserves to have their jobs outsourced.
 
2014-05-08 07:17:46 AM
For example, in the middle of the conversation, he often throws in this curveball math question : A hammer and a nail cost $1.10, and the hammer costs one dollar more than the nail. How much does the nail cost?
It's simple, but tricky.


Why is it tricky? He says, A (meaning ONE) hammer and A (also meaning ONE) nail cost $1.10
He also explicitly says the hammer costs $1.00 more than the nail. Since the total cost of the purchase is $1.10 and only two items are being purchased, how can the hammer be anything other than $1 and the nail anything other than 0.10?
 
2014-05-08 07:17:54 AM
Wow, I'm impressed. Give that man another bonus, he certainly deserves it!
 
2014-05-08 07:18:07 AM

Iplaybass: AverageAmericanGuy: FNG: I still don't get it and I'm a reasonably intelligent person.

Granted, I don't know what the fox says either.

1.10 = nail + hammer
hammer = nail + 1
1.10 = nail + (nail + 1)
1.10 = 2*nail + 1
.10 = 2*nail
.05 = nail

Or just guess and estimate from 10c per nail and then work your way down until nail + nail + 1 = 1.10.

I just subtracted $1 from $1.10, and split the difference.


The key word is "more". 1.00 is .90 more than .10.

1.05 is 1.00 more .05.

No need to make it complicated.
 
2014-05-08 07:18:32 AM
I'd answer it then get up and say "that's right biatch!"
And leave.
 
2014-05-08 07:18:44 AM
My answer: " I'd look it up on my phone because it's 2014 and it's a waste of my time and your money for me to be re-solving problems that are already solved."
 
2014-05-08 07:18:44 AM

NutWrench: For example, in the middle of the conversation, he often throws in this curveball math question : A hammer and a nail cost $1.10, and the hammer costs one dollar more than the nail. How much does the nail cost?
It's simple, but tricky.

Why is it tricky? He says, A (meaning ONE) hammer and A (also meaning ONE) nail cost $1.10
He also explicitly says the hammer costs $1.00 more than the nail. Since the total cost of the purchase is $1.10 and only two items are being purchased, how can the hammer be anything other than $1 and the nail anything other than 0.10?


ಠ_ಠ
 
2014-05-08 07:19:31 AM
Replied to the wrong post. Sorry.
 
2014-05-08 07:20:06 AM
I got it right on the first try! One dollar, that's easy.
 
2014-05-08 07:20:37 AM
You can get a simple question like that wrong and still be hired?

My boss in my Boobies-college job liked to put you in a cube to fill out an application and a written coding test, then stop by every few minutes to ask how you were doing and if you were done yet.

Some people really can't handle pressure.
 
2014-05-08 07:22:10 AM
That's not a trick question. Jesus.

A trick question is a question without an answer. Or at least without a farking easy answer.  This is simple first-grade addition/subtraction.
 
2014-05-08 07:22:41 AM

BMFPitt: You can get a simple question like that wrong and still be hired?

My boss in my Boobies-college job liked to put you in a cube to fill out an application and a written coding test, then stop by every few minutes to ask how you were doing and if you were done yet.

Some people really can't handle pressure.


Why would you leave that job?

/ like college boobies.
 
2014-05-08 07:23:12 AM
Aw crap. The hammer is $1.05, isn't it?
 
2014-05-08 07:23:16 AM
I think he's testing ability to think under pressure, but it's not the best approach.
 
2014-05-08 07:23:30 AM

BMFPitt: Boobies-college


Filterpwned.  I wish I went to boobies college.
 
2014-05-08 07:23:55 AM

BMFPitt: You can get a simple question like that wrong and still be hired?

My boss in my Boobies-college job liked to put you in a cube to fill out an application and a written coding test, then stop by every few minutes to ask how you were doing and if you were done yet.

Some people really can't handle pressure.


That sounds like a lot just to be a stripper
 
2014-05-08 07:24:38 AM

NutWrench: For example, in the middle of the conversation, he often throws in this curveball math question : A hammer and a nail cost $1.10, and the hammer costs one dollar more than the nail. How much does the nail cost?
It's simple, but tricky.

Why is it tricky? He says, A (meaning ONE) hammer and A (also meaning ONE) nail cost $1.10
He also explicitly says the hammer costs $1.00 more than the nail. Since the total cost of the purchase is $1.10 and only two items are being purchased, how can the hammer be anything other than $1 and the nail anything other than 0.10?


It says the hammer costs $1.00 more than the nail. So if the nail costs $0.05 then the hammer costs $1.05 since that's one dollar more than the nail and adds up to $1.10.

The question is really a test of someone's ability to parse the english language rather than their ability to do math.
 
2014-05-08 07:24:39 AM

NutWrench: Aw crap. The hammer is $1.05, isn't it?


The hammer costs one freedom.
 
2014-05-08 07:24:58 AM
What is your favorite paradox; and what paradox are you trying to resolve now?
 
2014-05-08 07:25:14 AM

BMFPitt: You can get a simple question like that wrong and still be hired?

My boss in my Boobies-college job liked to put you in a cube to fill out an application and a written coding test, then stop by every few minutes to ask how you were doing and if you were done yet.

Some people really can't handle pressure.


*snert*
 
2014-05-08 07:26:26 AM

Mjeck: What is your favorite paradox; and what paradox are you trying to resolve now?


You can do anything you set your mind. Except, prove that statement wrong.
 
2014-05-08 07:26:47 AM
well, *now* I could. I probably would have blurted out the wrong answer if it were asked verbally. If it was on a written test/quiz/application, I would probably have gotten it right.
 
2014-05-08 07:27:22 AM
Wow. That's a curveball? I think it's about a fifth grade algebra question. We're screwed.
 
2014-05-08 07:27:49 AM

abhorrent1: Bullshiat. He didn't say what size nail. How does he know that the nail doesn't actually cost more than the hammer?
And if he can buy a hammer for $1.05, I want to know where he shops.

/stupid CEO
//Probably never swung a hammer in his life.


If he's buying a nail for $0.05, they are pounding him so hard, the cheap hammer is a reach around
 
2014-05-08 07:27:53 AM
Why is it always these MBA dickhead business CEO types that think the candidate they're looking for is the one that has to "think outside the box" when given trick questions? It just reeks of an elitist power trip to throw up these word games and watch candidates jump through hoops trying to solve them. Seriously, I don't see this shiat in any other profession. It's always these business clowns that throw oddball scenarios at their applicants, as if they're admitting that their profession is such of a joke that a trained monkey can do it, and the only requirement is to be an elitist dickhole to everyone.

Howabout a candidate who just does his farking job? And when you ask him questions about the job, he answers them thoroughly, clearly, and efficiently? What the fark is a stupid math problem going to tell you about how he solves real world problems?
 
2014-05-08 07:28:22 AM
ITT

people who had to scroll down for the answer pretending they didn't and acting superior
 
2014-05-08 07:28:45 AM
Don't work for someone who asks trick questions.
 
2014-05-08 07:28:57 AM

Iplaybass: AverageAmericanGuy: FNG: I still don't get it and I'm a reasonably intelligent person.

Granted, I don't know what the fox says either.

1.10 = nail + hammer
hammer = nail + 1
1.10 = nail + (nail + 1)
1.10 = 2*nail + 1
.10 = 2*nail
.05 = nail

Or just guess and estimate from 10c per nail and then work your way down until nail + nail + 1 = 1.10.

I just subtracted $1 from $1.10, and split the difference.


s12.postimage.org
 
2014-05-08 07:29:01 AM
"The only nail here is how I nailed your mom, boyeeee" is the correct answer.
 
2014-05-08 07:29:20 AM
Is the U.S. government buying the hammer? Because then it costs $600, plus shipping and handling.
 
2014-05-08 07:30:51 AM
Luckily I studied my old-school R&B and arrived at the answer. Have mercy.
 
2014-05-08 07:31:07 AM
Other acceptable answer

"Depends on the state and local tax rate"
 
2014-05-08 07:32:20 AM

MurphyMurphy: ITT

people who had to scroll down for the answer pretending they didn't and acting superior


Got it wrong, didn't ya.
 
2014-05-08 07:32:25 AM
Sure, why not?

/been a long time since pre-algebra
//it's 5 cents
 
2014-05-08 07:34:04 AM

Ishkur: Why is it always these MBA dickhead business CEO types that think the candidate they're looking for is the one that has to "think outside the box" when given trick questions? It just reeks of an elitist power trip to throw up these word games and watch candidates jump through hoops trying to solve them. Seriously, I don't see this shiat in any other profession. It's always these business clowns that throw oddball scenarios at their applicants, as if they're admitting that their profession is such of a joke that a trained monkey can do it, and the only requirement is to be an elitist dickhole to everyone.

Howabout a candidate who just does his farking job? And when you ask him questions about the job, he answers them thoroughly, clearly, and efficiently? What the fark is a stupid math problem going to tell you about how he solves real world problems?


You sound unemployed. And bitter.
 
2014-05-08 07:34:31 AM

PreMortem: Emposter: That's a trick question?

It's farking addition/subtraction.

Damn, we're farked as a country, aren't we?

I would disagree. It's actually called conjunction bias and a vast majority will answer incorrectly.


The test is successful if it tells you that you don't want to work for that CEO.
 
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