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(io9)   The good news: We are at the dawn of a new age. The bad news: It's the age of epidemics   (io9.com) divider line 56
    More: Scary, international travel, coronas, measles, U.S. Centers for Disease Control, SARS  
•       •       •

2955 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 May 2014 at 6:28 PM (50 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-05-07 03:59:23 PM  
Are We At The Dawn Of The Age of Epidemics?

No, we're most of a century past the age of epidemics. We freak out over a few dozen or few hundred cases of diseases that once affected thousands of times that many. A barely transmissible new virus has the media on red alert.
 
2014-05-07 04:11:39 PM  

ZAZ: Are We At The Dawn Of The Age of Epidemics?

No, we're most of a century past the age of epidemics. We freak out over a few dozen or few hundred cases of diseases that once affected thousands of times that many. A barely transmissible new virus has the media on red alert.


Then, antibiotics stop working....

37.media.tumblr.com
 
2014-05-07 04:53:08 PM  
Well, the world's population needs a good culling.  I think the earth would be a lot better off with 2-3 billion people instead of 7 billion plus.
 
2014-05-07 05:42:41 PM  
This is the dawning of the age of epidemics.
 
2014-05-07 06:35:38 PM  
Meh, I live in a rural state. All of you city dwelling hippies are gonna have a bad time though.
 
2014-05-07 06:47:13 PM  
Yes but think of the property prices
 
2014-05-07 06:50:42 PM  
When have we ever not been in an Age of Epidemics?

Malaria has killed more people than war. Smallpox killed 200 million in the 20th century alone before we eradicated it in 1979. Typhoid, cholera, polio, tuberculosis... all these things were frequent, common, and lethal before we learned how to purify our air and water. Diseases have destroyed more Empires than armies (Ancient Rome was rife with them).

The Age of Epidemics was BEFORE the Germ Theory of Disease. Not after.
 
2014-05-07 06:54:07 PM  
We're entering the Age of Knee Jerk Overreaction and Overinformation. We just like to call everything an epidemic.
 
2014-05-07 06:56:33 PM  

Ishkur: When have we ever not been in an Age of Epidemics?

Malaria has killed more people than war. Smallpox killed 200 million in the 20th century alone before we eradicated it in 1979. Typhoid, cholera, polio, tuberculosis... all these things were frequent, common, and lethal before we learned how to purify our air and water. Diseases have destroyed more Empires than armies (Ancient Rome was rife with them).

The Age of Epidemics was BEFORE the Germ Theory of Disease. Not after.


Whar bubonic plague, whar?!
 
2014-05-07 06:58:11 PM  

Splish: We're entering the Age of Knee Jerk Overreaction and Overinformation. We just like to call everything an epidemic.


Pretty much this. by the time a REAL epidemic hits us we may be so desensitized to the damn sensationalist news that we wont believe it till it wipes us out
 
2014-05-07 07:06:55 PM  

Splish: We're entering the Age of Knee Jerk Overreaction and Overinformation. We just like to call everything an epidemic.


Are you saying it's an epidemic of overreaction?
 
2014-05-07 07:09:56 PM  
Not to worry, people.  By the time antibiotics have become completely ineffective, we'll have nanotechnology which can replace them.  Tiny nanomachines will circulate through your blood and wipe out bacteria and viruses.

Then, some terrorist or misanthropist will create self replicating nanobots which eat everything and turn it into more nanobots.  They replicate exponentially, sweeping across the planet and scouring it of all life within weeks.  There is no escape.

The good news is, they'll wipe out all the diseases in the process.
 
2014-05-07 07:11:24 PM  

Craps the Gorilla: Splish: We're entering the Age of Knee Jerk Overreaction and Overinformation. We just like to call everything an epidemic.

Pretty much this. by the time a REAL epidemic hits us we may be so desensitized to the damn sensationalist news that we wont believe it till it wipes us out


So, the media is involved in a massive conspiracy to bring about the End Times? Then Nancy Grace truely is the Antichrist...
 
2014-05-07 07:16:41 PM  
mutantreviewers.files.wordpress.com
I read the headline in this voice.
 
2014-05-07 07:17:26 PM  
we're having an epidemic epidemic!
 
2014-05-07 07:17:45 PM  

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: [mutantreviewers.files.wordpress.com image 811x644]
I read the headline in this voice.


I read the headline and shut down everything.
 
2014-05-07 07:42:45 PM  
Want to fix the problem?  Ease the regulations on spreading the plague and then providing the cure.  This way, corporations will have the financial incentive to deal with the problem.
 
2014-05-07 07:44:39 PM  
The silver lining is that with only 2-3 billion people left on Earth, global warming will be less severe - maybe.
 
2014-05-07 07:48:34 PM  

President Madagascar: Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: [mutantreviewers.files.wordpress.com image 811x644]
I read the headline in this voice.

I read the headline and shut down everything.


I read the headline and constructed a research  lab in Africa.

encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com
 
2014-05-07 07:49:55 PM  
we are definitely NOT at the dawn of the age of hyperbole.
 
2014-05-07 07:57:29 PM  
As was mentioned above, we could have a major pandemic at any time, and with modern travel patterns, it could get extraordinarily bad very quickly. it COULD be that we will see multiple real pandemics, but most every thing in that article listed as epidemics are insignifigant, and most could be dealt with if the world decided they were really important, but instead, they just get up to the media hype stage, not the do anything radical about it stage. Call me when we care more about the mosquito born diseases than large birds, I'll believe its serious when we unban DDT and its game on.
 
2014-05-07 08:07:36 PM  
And some of those could've been prevented by jackass parents vaccinating their crotchfruit
 
2014-05-07 08:12:10 PM  
i60.tinypic.com
 
2014-05-07 08:34:20 PM  
2chris2: Not to worry, people.  By the time antibiotics have become completely ineffective, we'll have nanotechnology which can replace them.  Tiny nanomachines will circulate through your blood and wipe out bacteria and viruses.

Then, some terrorist or misanthropist will create self replicating nanobots which eat everything and turn it into more nanobots.  They replicate exponentially, sweeping across the planet and scouring it of all life within weeks.  There is no escape.

The good news is, they'll wipe out all the diseases in the process.

Ahahahaha good lord no.

We are so far from that kind of nanobot (if that kind of nanobot is even POSSIBLE) that it's not even funny.

And I'm skeptical about endlessl-replicating nanobots. If that were so simple,or at all energy-possible, why haven't bacteria beaten us to that?
 
2014-05-07 08:35:46 PM  
It is a natural process that when a species overpopulates, it ends up being attacked by diseases.
 
2014-05-07 08:47:30 PM  

Felgraf: 2chris2: Not to worry, people.  By the time antibiotics have become completely ineffective, we'll have nanotechnology which can replace them.  Tiny nanomachines will circulate through your blood and wipe out bacteria and viruses.

Then, some terrorist or misanthropist will create self replicating nanobots which eat everything and turn it into more nanobots.  They replicate exponentially, sweeping across the planet and scouring it of all life within weeks.  There is no escape.

The good news is, they'll wipe out all the diseases in the process.

Ahahahaha good lord no.

We are so far from that kind of nanobot (if that kind of nanobot is even POSSIBLE) that it's not even funny.

And I'm skeptical about endlessl-replicating nanobots. If that were so simple,or at all energy-possible, why haven't bacteria beaten us to that?


Well, the short answer is they have.

You're made of microorganisms, covered in microorganisms, and so is everything else all the way down to the coal seams.
 
2014-05-07 09:32:39 PM  

Mike_LowELL: Want to fix the problem?  Ease the regulations on spreading the plague and then providing the cure.  This way, corporations will have the financial incentive to deal with the problem.


We just need stronger regulations that forbid anyone from creating or spreading epidemics. Perhaps a new agency of government specifically dedicated to the enforcement of such regulations.
 
2014-05-07 09:36:52 PM  
Maybe we should be airlifting propaganda into Waziristan that says "Your child wouldn't have polio if it weren't for the farking Taliban."

I'm sure we can find some existing fliers and just cross off "Jenny McCarthy."
 
2014-05-07 09:41:08 PM  

doglover: ZAZ: Are We At The Dawn Of The Age of Epidemics?

No, we're most of a century past the age of epidemics. We freak out over a few dozen or few hundred cases of diseases that once affected thousands of times that many. A barely transmissible new virus has the media on red alert.

Then, antibiotics stop working....


It's not like there is one kind of antibiotic. Sure the shiat they pass out like cough drops isn't going to be effective for long, but there are other things they reserve for antibiotic resistant bacteria that you don't get without a damn good reason. Those will work for a long time.
 
2014-05-07 09:54:12 PM  

2chris2: Not to worry, people.  By the time antibiotics have become completely ineffective, we'll have nanotechnology which can replace them.  Tiny nanomachines will circulate through your blood and wipe out bacteria and viruses.

Then, some terrorist or misanthropist will create self replicating nanobots which eat everything and turn it into more nanobots.  They replicate exponentially, sweeping across the planet and scouring it of all life within weeks.  There is no escape.

The good news is, they'll wipe out all the diseases in the process.


You've been reading too much Michael Crichton.

/Prey is awesome
 
2014-05-07 09:57:08 PM  

Debeo Summa Credo: We just need stronger regulations that forbid anyone from creating or spreading epidemics. Perhaps a new agency of government specifically dedicated to the enforcement of such regulations.


Good idea. We could even call it the Center for Disease Prevention or something.
 
2014-05-07 10:12:39 PM  

mjjt: [i60.tinypic.com image 600x484]


Nice...knew Jenny McCarthy was gonna be worked in here somehow.

/threadjack

I've often wondered if all these street drugs are so bad for people why aren't lethal injections just a massive dose of say heroin?   It'd work for all but Keith Richards right?

//end threadjack
 
2014-05-07 10:20:08 PM  

Earguy: Well, the world's population needs a good culling.  I think the earth would be a lot better off with 2-3 billion people instead of 7 billion plus.


You first.
 
2014-05-07 10:24:52 PM  
Thanks a LOT Sciencebama!
 
2014-05-07 10:28:14 PM  

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: [mutantreviewers.files.wordpress.com image 811x644]
I read the headline in this voice.


Hey, it's the 'I'm not saying it was aliens' guy!
 
2014-05-07 10:32:32 PM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: It's not like there is one kind of antibiotic. Sure the shiat they pass out like cough drops isn't going to be effective for long, but there are other things they reserve for antibiotic resistant bacteria that you don't get without a damn good reason. Those will work for a long time.


That's a nice thought, but resistance is already popping up against even third- and fourth-line antibiotics, and spreads incredibly rapidly.  We really are facing a nasty possibility of going back to the good old days where people died from minor injuries turning septic.
 
2014-05-07 10:35:56 PM  

Chameleon: That's a nice thought, but resistance is already popping up against even third- and fourth-line antibiotics


Do you have a cite on that? I'd be interested to read it.
 
2014-05-07 10:40:26 PM  
FTFA: WHO Declares Polio A Public Health Emergency

mlblogsourgame.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-05-07 10:43:58 PM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: doglover: ZAZ: Are We At The Dawn Of The Age of Epidemics?

No, we're most of a century past the age of epidemics. We freak out over a few dozen or few hundred cases of diseases that once affected thousands of times that many. A barely transmissible new virus has the media on red alert.

Then, antibiotics stop working....

It's not like there is one kind of antibiotic. Sure the shiat they pass out like cough drops isn't going to be effective for long, but there are other things they reserve for antibiotic resistant bacteria that you don't get without a damn good reason. Those will work for a long time.


Phages might be the next stepwww.uspharmacist.com
 
2014-05-07 10:49:32 PM  

Chameleon: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: It's not like there is one kind of antibiotic. Sure the shiat they pass out like cough drops isn't going to be effective for long, but there are other things they reserve for antibiotic resistant bacteria that you don't get without a damn good reason. Those will work for a long time.

That's a nice thought, but resistance is already popping up against even third- and fourth-line antibiotics, and spreads incredibly rapidly.  We really are facing a nasty possibility of going back to the good old days where people died from minor injuries turning septic.


I read something that the weird thing is that if we stopped all antibiotic usage, it would only take a generation or so for the regular, old antibiotic susceptible bacteria to come back.
 
2014-05-07 10:54:36 PM  

machoprogrammer: Chameleon: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: It's not like there is one kind of antibiotic. Sure the shiat they pass out like cough drops isn't going to be effective for long, but there are other things they reserve for antibiotic resistant bacteria that you don't get without a damn good reason. Those will work for a long time.

That's a nice thought, but resistance is already popping up against even third- and fourth-line antibiotics, and spreads incredibly rapidly.  We really are facing a nasty possibility of going back to the good old days where people died from minor injuries turning septic.

I read something that the weird thing is that if we stopped all antibiotic usage, it would only take a generation or so for the regular, old antibiotic susceptible bacteria to come back.


Yeah, but that would be a nasty generation...
 
2014-05-07 11:08:19 PM  
And loons are in their antivax house and the stupider are fearing SARS
 
2014-05-07 11:08:48 PM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Chameleon: That's a nice thought, but resistance is already popping up against even third- and fourth-line antibiotics

Do you have a cite on that? I'd be interested to read it.


For a great, global look at the issue, the WHO just came out with their Antimicrobial Resistance Report for 2014.  The summary is a pretty easy read and gives a nice overview of the issue.

Some more specific reads:
Vancomycin resistance is global, and has spread to MRSA
Minocyclin-resistant Propionibacterium acnesand  Staph. aureus(luckily, resistance in Staph is linked to susceptibility to phage)
 Klebsiella pneumoniae and other Enterobacter are showing up carbanepem-resistant, as is  Pseudomonas
Of course XDR TB is loads of fun; so is Artemisinin-resistant malaria

(sorry if some of those aren't accessible; it's hard to tell what's free and what's paid for by work),
 
2014-05-07 11:11:26 PM  

Felgraf: 2chris2: Not to worry, people.  By the time antibiotics have become completely ineffective, we'll have nanotechnology which can replace them.  Tiny nanomachines will circulate through your blood and wipe out bacteria and viruses.

Then, some terrorist or misanthropist will create self replicating nanobots which eat everything and turn it into more nanobots.  They replicate exponentially, sweeping across the planet and scouring it of all life within weeks.  There is no escape.

The good news is, they'll wipe out all the diseases in the process.

Ahahahaha good lord no.

We are so far from that kind of nanobot (if that kind of nanobot is even POSSIBLE) that it's not even funny.

And I'm skeptical about endlessl-replicating nanobots. If that were so simple,or at all energy-possible, why haven't bacteria beaten us to that?


Because bacteria aren't evil, narcissistic shiatbags like humans usually are? bacteria are content to be.

We...aren't.
 
2014-05-07 11:15:11 PM  

machoprogrammer: I read something that the weird thing is that if we stopped all antibiotic usage, it would only take a generation or so for the regular, old antibiotic susceptible bacteria to come back.


Mmm...maybe.  A lot of the resistance genes are suboptimal for growth so they might get outcompeted by the wild type, but genetic regulation is a complicated thing and I doubt it would be that clean of an outcome.  Plus, as  dogloverpointed out, that would be a really nasty thing to live through.
 
2014-05-07 11:20:29 PM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: doglover: ZAZ: Are We At The Dawn Of The Age of Epidemics?

No, we're most of a century past the age of epidemics. We freak out over a few dozen or few hundred cases of diseases that once affected thousands of times that many. A barely transmissible new virus has the media on red alert.

Then, antibiotics stop working....

It's not like there is one kind of antibiotic. Sure the shiat they pass out like cough drops isn't going to be effective for long, but there are other things they reserve for antibiotic resistant bacteria that you don't get without a damn good reason. Those will work for a long time.

Phages might be the next step


For a primer on bacteriophages, refer to the March 1931 Popular Mechanics, pg 705.
 
2014-05-07 11:46:31 PM  

Chameleon: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Chameleon: That's a nice thought, but resistance is already popping up against even third- and fourth-line antibiotics

Do you have a cite on that? I'd be interested to read it.

For a great, global look at the issue, the WHO just came out with their Antimicrobial Resistance Report for 2014.  The summary is a pretty easy read and gives a nice overview of the issue.

Some more specific reads:
Vancomycin resistance is global, and has spread to MRSA
Minocyclin-resistant Propionibacterium acnesand  Staph. aureus(luckily, resistance in Staph is linked to susceptibility to phage)
 Klebsiella pneumoniae and other Enterobacter are showing up carbanepem-resistant, as is  Pseudomonas
Of course XDR TB is loads of fun; so is Artemisinin-resistant malaria

(sorry if some of those aren't accessible; it's hard to tell what's free and what's paid for by work),


Great, thanks!
 
2014-05-07 11:53:24 PM  
img2.wikia.nocookie.net
www.rankopedia.com
 
2014-05-08 12:09:53 AM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: Phages might be the next step


img1.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-05-08 12:21:58 AM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: Phages might be the next step


static1.wikia.nocookie.net
 
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