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(Science News)   Scary: Dinosaurs. Scarier: Dinosaurs that can heal themselves   (sci-news.com) divider line 47
    More: Scary, imaging science, dinosaurs  
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7016 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 May 2014 at 3:58 PM (19 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



47 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-05-07 02:02:01 PM
Get Hollywood on the phone!

d2vo5twcnd9mdi.cloudfront.net
 
2014-05-07 02:15:53 PM

Sybarite: Get Hollywood on the phone!

[d2vo5twcnd9mdi.cloudfront.net image 388x600]


Alright, we're done here. I've got the lights. *click*
 
2014-05-07 02:27:24 PM
Clever girl.
 
2014-05-07 03:30:28 PM
Big whoop, my bones do that too.
 
2014-05-07 03:59:15 PM
Obviously not fast enough.
 
2014-05-07 04:02:28 PM
Are we really impressed now that an animal healed? really?
 
2014-05-07 04:03:33 PM
What about dinosaurs that can heal the sick?

i58.tinypic.com
 
2014-05-07 04:09:30 PM
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-05-07 04:10:23 PM
Dinosaur that can heel:

rookery.s3.amazonaws.com
 
2014-05-07 04:11:31 PM
Pleistocene, please.
 
2014-05-07 04:12:43 PM
If only animals of today had such mystical healing ability!
 
2014-05-07 04:13:14 PM
And thus the origins of bone cancer. I had a conversation about "if evolution is so great, then why bone cancer?" Well, it turns out that bones require constant repair of minor damages. If these repair systems go whack, then the individual will die. But most individuals just get the upside, not the downside, so the trait of bones being able to heal and rebuild is conserved.
 
2014-05-07 04:13:51 PM

Sybarite: Get Hollywood on the phone!

[d2vo5twcnd9mdi.cloudfront.net image 388x600]


There are more strange things on the Internet than are dreamt of in our philosophies
 
2014-05-07 04:14:21 PM
Very Scaly.
 
2014-05-07 04:15:16 PM
Big deal, the Voth think they're so freaking superior to us already, now they'll rub this in our faces.
 
2014-05-07 04:17:32 PM
Meh.  I can heal myself too.  Bones, cuts, etc.  big deal.
 
2014-05-07 04:21:49 PM
FTFA: "Bones can absorb a wide range of elements and are therefore an important sink in the body for trace elements like cooper, strontium and zinc."

i1.ytimg.com
 
2014-05-07 04:23:13 PM

Sybarite: Get Hollywood on the phone!

[d2vo5twcnd9mdi.cloudfront.net image 388x600]


You win. Everyone else, please exit the building. Turn off the lights as you go
 
2014-05-07 04:24:47 PM
Not surprising considering that crocs and Alligators have amazing healing properties in their blood.
 
2014-05-07 04:25:10 PM
Here's the open access article for anyone interested.

http://rsif.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/11/96/20140277.full.p df +html

Phil is always fun to have a beer with.
 
Skr
2014-05-07 04:27:18 PM
Allosaurus fragilistic expialidocious
 
2014-05-07 04:34:10 PM
"It's exciting to realize how little we know about bone, even after hundreds of years of research. The fact that information on how our own skeleton works can be explored using a 150-million-year-old dinosaur just shows how interlaced science can be."

Clearly Dr. Manning isn't an MD or even a biologist.

We know a shiatload about how bone heals, grows and regenerates.

Here's a recent article. Literally, one of thousands on the subject.

http://www.jbc.org/content/285/33/25103.full
 
2014-05-07 04:39:19 PM

wildcardjack: And thus the origins of bone cancer. I had a conversation about "if evolution is so great, then why bone cancer?" Well, it turns out that bones require constant repair of minor damages. If these repair systems go whack, then the individual will die. But most individuals just get the upside, not the downside, so the trait of bones being able to heal and rebuild is conserved.


Every cancer in fact.

Metabolism is inherently oncogenic.
 
2014-05-07 04:40:36 PM
WTF is up with Fark, I can't even post an image
 
2014-05-07 04:42:20 PM
"Cooper?"
 
2014-05-07 04:46:38 PM
Can you roll up a velociraptor cleric?
 
2014-05-07 04:47:04 PM
Scarier: they're fookin' dead, mate. No need to heal yourself if you're dead for a few million years.
 
2014-05-07 04:47:40 PM

Ex-Texan: "Cooper?"


I have a nice Sheldon Cooper image but couldn't post shiat... fark the fark, these guys, what the hell.
 
2014-05-07 04:56:19 PM
"It's remarkable that the very same chemistry that initiates the healing of bone in humans also seems to have followed a similar pathway in dinosaurs"

Really? Are humans much different from other modern vertebrates* in that regard?

I'd have figured that most things that have bones are going to heal them in pretty similar ways.

*and especially contemporary dinosaurs - aka birds
 
2014-05-07 04:57:58 PM
trace elements like cooper

Trying mighty hard.

www.metroactive.com
 
2014-05-07 05:02:21 PM

JesseL: "It's remarkable that the very same chemistry that initiates the healing of bone in humans also seems to have followed a similar pathway in dinosaurs"

Really? Are humans much different from other modern vertebrates* in that regard?

I'd have figured that most things that have bones are going to heal them in pretty similar ways.

*and especially contemporary dinosaurs - aka birds


I agree, this guy is full of shiat.
 
2014-05-07 05:23:56 PM
i698.photobucket.com
 
2014-05-07 05:24:11 PM

TheOriginalEd: Are we really impressed now that an animal healed? really?


Most dinosaurs used to have to be taken into the shop for repairs, what with all those attached lasers and cybernetic enhancements.
 
2014-05-07 05:26:36 PM

vodka: WTF is up with Fark, I can't even post an image


Are you getting that NoScript XSS thing?
 
2014-05-07 05:30:09 PM

K3rmy: [i698.photobucket.com image 640x381]


I'm holding out for Dinosaur Terminators.
 
2014-05-07 05:31:53 PM
So having just watched Cosmos, I'm of the understanding that the world has less oxygen in the air than in the giant dinosaur eras. Jurassic Park's dinos would have been much less terrifying if all they could do is lay on the ground and wheeze.
 
2014-05-07 05:53:21 PM

dj_spanmaster: So having just watched Cosmos, I'm of the understanding that the world has less oxygen in the air than in the giant dinosaur eras. Jurassic Park's dinos would have been much less terrifying if all they could do is lay on the ground and wheeze.


deforestation is a biatch.
 
2014-05-07 06:02:13 PM

dj_spanmaster: So having just watched Cosmos, I'm of the understanding that the world has less oxygen in the air than in the giant dinosaur eras. Jurassic Park's dinos would have been much less terrifying if all they could do is lay on the ground and wheeze.


The peak oxygen era was at the end of the Carboniferous era and into the Permian age, before the dinosaurs.  It actually hit a relative* low during the Jurassic era of about 15%, so those dinosaurs would have had little trouble in our current atmosphere.    The large amphibians of the Carboniferous and Permian ages would have problems though.

*Relative low for the eras after atmospheric oxygen became normal.  About 1,000 million years ago, and before, atmospheric oxygen was at very low levels or non-existent.
 
2014-05-07 06:02:50 PM
Meh, big deal... my hard-partying Franken-dino DNA construct, Jurassic Punk, has been regenerating like a fiend since City of Villains hit in 2005 and is still in Champions Online today.

/Was Jurassic Punk before it was cool
//*adjusts hipster glasses*
 
2014-05-07 06:33:40 PM

dj_spanmaster: So having just watched Cosmos, I'm of the understanding that the world has less oxygen in the air than in the giant dinosaur eras. Jurassic Park's dinos would have been much less terrifying if all they could do is lay on the ground and wheeze.


Well, Cosmos was talking mostly about the Carboniferous and Devonian Eras (where there WAS much more oxygen than there is now; from the end of the Permian through the entirety of the Reign of Big Farking Ground-Running Dinosaurs to the beginning of the reign of Big Furry Therapsid-Descendants And Little Dinosaurian Bats (about 50mya in the Tertiary) there was actually less oxygen than there is now.

Of course, in the Permian there was also a bit of a mass extinction that made what happened at the K-T boundary look like a mere tornadic oubreak in comparison (the K-T extinction was still sucky, but it didn't wipe out 95 percent of all extant lifeforms and leave a therapsid guinea-pig-analogue as the most common land vertebrate for the next thirty million years because it was the only thing that could prosper).  Which, ironically, also ended the last Age of Therapsids (we're in the second one with us lovely furry therapsids we call "mammals").  We used to ha-ha-only-serious laugh about the cockroaches and rats inheriting the earth after a big nuclear war...that pretty much actually happened in the Permian, though less from nukes and far more from what was probably a Series Of Very Unfortunate Events including megavolcanoes (that make the Yellowstone caldera seem like the queen's polite burping in comparison), quite possibly multiple rocks falling from the skies, a methane hydrate sublimation event, massive climate change partly the result of having a single continent all glommed together, and wildfires...all happening at once.

It's now actually thought that the air sacs in modern dinosaurs (birds) and the breathing mechanism in birds (which is a one-way pulmonary pump, and which is actually more efficient than the bellows pump that mammals and therapsids use with their lungs) evolved originally at the dawn of the age of dinosaurs--as a way to allow a high-metabolic-rate critter to be able to breathe in the oxygen conditions of the Triassic through the Cretaceous (which had lower oxygenation levels...did I mention the P-Tr extinction farked up all the things?)  It's also been speculated this is why therapsids (including our ancestors) DIDN'T regain dominance in the Triassic--dinosaurimorph and dinosaur lungs were just better than therapsid and protomammal lungs in getting oxygen in.

If anything, if WE went back to the Age of Dinosaurs there'd be a real risk that us humans would suffer signs of altitude sickness and oxygen hunger, especially with Triassic-era oxygen levels (oxygen was only at 11-15% of atmosphere then, compared to 21% now; it'd be at best the equivalent of hitting one of the peaks above Denver, and possibly the level of the atmosphere at Denali or in parts of the Himalayas around the time dinosaurs first evolved).  Dinosaurs, on the other hand, might deal with it OK or might suffer signs of oxygen poisoning (and realistically, I'd suspect the former--modern dinosaurs deal with equivalently extreme changes in atmospheric oxygen and manage just fine, even able to do a very high-metabolic-demand activity like throwing themselves at the ground and missing at height levels where us silly synapsids have to bust out the oxygen and pressurization in the metal tubes we use to throw ourselves at the ground and miss).
 
2014-05-07 07:17:23 PM
"heal themselves" = masturbation?

/works for me when I really need it

//didn't RTFA

//slashies are so sexy!
 
2014-05-07 08:16:03 PM
Is there a dinosaur that's can't heal itself?
 
2014-05-07 10:18:32 PM

unfarkingbelievable: "heal themselves" = masturbation?


Which bring to mind the poor T-Rex flailing around with it's stubby arms unable to masturbate. No wonder they became killing machines.
 
2014-05-07 10:51:29 PM
I'll worry if they get to SCP-682 level.
 
2014-05-07 10:57:00 PM

Sybarite: Get Hollywood on the phone!

[d2vo5twcnd9mdi.cloudfront.net image 388x600]


O.o

Where did you find that?!

it's perfect! bizarre as hell, but perfect.
 
2014-05-07 11:05:00 PM
Awesome: Meglomaniacal Devil Dinosaur
img2.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-05-08 05:37:20 PM

Carn: What about dinosaurs that can heal the sick?

[i58.tinypic.com image 350x262]


Jesus healed the dinosaurs.
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
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