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(Kansas City)   3/4 of high school seniors don't know how to math. For example, 1,527.34¾% don't understand percentages   (kansascity.com ) divider line
    More: Obvious, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress, high schools, report cards, Education Secretary Arne Duncan, Algebra I.  
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3218 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 May 2014 at 3:21 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-05-07 01:54:28 PM  
I dunno, seems easy enough.

www.momdot.com
 
2014-05-07 01:57:32 PM  
Among the findings:
-Students who reported rarely or never discussing reading interpretations in class had average scores lower than those who did daily or almost daily.
-An overwhelming majority reported that reading is enjoyable. Students who strongly disagreed with the idea that reading is enjoyable had an average score much lower than those who strongly agreed.
-Math scores were higher, on average, for students who took calculus and lowest for students who had not taken a math course beyond Algebra I.
-Math scores were higher for students who reported math was their favorite subject, believed the subject would help them in the future or thought their class was engaging.


i60.photobucket.com
cloud-2.steampowered.com
 
2014-05-07 02:04:40 PM  
"Michael Petrilli, executive vice president at the conservative-leaning Thomas B. Fordham Institute, said it's unclear why younger students are doing better, but not high school seniors. "

Why?

Because it takes 13 years to teach a high school grad, from kindergarten to 12th grade.

You failed to inspire them back when they were younger students and failed to give them the support they needed to succeed.

You can't use one weird trick on a high school senior to motivate someone to study.  Those habits get set very early in their school life.
 
2014-05-07 02:54:53 PM  

meat0918: "Michael Petrilli, executive vice president at the conservative-leaning Thomas B. Fordham Institute, said it's unclear why younger students are doing better, but not high school seniors. "

Why?

Because it takes 13 years to teach a high school grad, from kindergarten to 12th grade.

You failed to inspire them back when they were younger students and failed to give them the support they needed to succeed.

You can't use one weird trick on a high school senior to motivate someone to study.  Those habits get set very early in their school life.


*sigh*

Example 1. There were 90 employees in a company last year. This year the number of employees increased by 10 percent. How many employees are in the company this year? (A) 9 (B) 81 (C) 91 (D) 99 (E) 100   By eighth grade, it would seem that almost everyone should be able to handle a question like this. Children are taught to divide and to calculate percentages in elementary school. Dividing by ten is the easiest form of division. Dividing a whole number by ten is easier yet. Adding a one-digit number (9) to a two-digit number (90) is elementary. It is a problem based on a simple mathematical concept, using simple arithmetic, requiring a simple logical interpolation to get the right answer. It is an excellent example for starting to think about what below average means in mathematics-because 62 percent of eighth-graders got this item wrong.

(And you figure a few guessed and got it right.  So I'm just going to call it 2/3rds)

Look...

Either our schools are notably more farked than anyone can imagine and somehow 2/3rds of students manage to get to 8th grade without learning how to add 10% to a number.

OR

2/3rds of students simply lack the ability.  They lack the ability to learn, retain (And having been a student recently, I think the retain is more critical.  Sure, I will NEVER get Cantor and infinites because my brain doesn't work that way, but I don't retain Newton beyond F=MA for very long because I don't use him on a day to day basis), and above all else USE all of the giant ball of facts in an interesting way fast enough to pass the test.  Because that takes internalization which takes time, practice, and ability, pick 2.5.  Lots of them.

So yeah, there's a limit to what people can learn.  And there's a limit to how fast.  Not saying that there aren't some *really* bad schools/teachers out there, but 2/3rds?  Wow, we're farked.  (Or alternatively, we've always been this farked, and the 1/3rd of people are just that awesome, and so we shouldn't be worried).

Look, an IQ of 70 is defined as too stupid to know that murder is wrong.  So:

* What's the point where you can't learn algebra period?  (And if you want, algebra -> calculus/P=NP/Cantorian infinites/Quantum Bullshiat).
* What's the point where you can't learn and retain all of algebra as fast as anticipated?
* What's the point where you definitely can't keep up in the class full of Einsteins?  Because they're just smarter than you.
 
2014-05-07 02:55:20 PM  
The main problem with math courses is they don't teach them the fundamentals and build from there. My kid is expected to memorize addition, subtraction and multiplication problems, but not the why.

She is in fourth grade and they still haven't taught the complex number system.
 
2014-05-07 03:09:20 PM  

Solty Dog: She is in fourth grade and they still haven't taught the complex number system.


You mean the a+bi thing?

So I was in a school system that was good enough to get mentioned in Time and Newsweek as a "model for the future of our schools" or words to that effect.  Rich kids, lots of Indians, de facto tracking, a quarter of the senior class took the BC Calculus exam and the average grade was a 4.

Uh, they sorta mentioned that in passing in Algebra 1 as a "Yeah, quadratic equations puke out weird results.  And here's some random crazy stuff".  And then periodically had us play with i-stuff when we redid quadratic equations.

Next time I really used it was in my college Differential Equations course, because they explained the XKCD comic.

Yeah, I wouldn't be worried.  Unless your kid is a 5-sigma kid is a class full of other 5-sigmas.  And then she'll be doing alright no matter what.   If she's good at math, you might try introducing it to her at some point on your own(like Mom introduced the concept of square roots to me so that when we got to multiplication in 3rd grade, squares and square roots in 4th and exponents in 5th, I'd been doing them in my head for 4-5 years, which was really nice because I had that intuitive knowledge that let me go fast), but yeah, don't be worried.

imgs.xkcd.com
 
2014-05-07 03:25:23 PM  

ITGreen: I dunno, seems easy enough.

[www.momdot.com image 662x424]


This should be useful when their employers decide to estimate their gross pay.
 
2014-05-07 03:26:29 PM  
It's numerical dyslexia. It affects anywhere from eleventy to twenty-teen percent of Americans.
 
2014-05-07 03:26:55 PM  

meyerkev: You mean the a+bi thing?


Yes. I am trying to help her in math and find myself having to explain concepts behind everything. They really didn't even teacher her how an equation works. So when I was showing her how to manipulate it by doing something to both sides, she was amazed.
 
2014-05-07 03:28:21 PM  
School is such a joke.  I know people with degrees from prestigious universities that can't do basic math.  Things that were covered in 7th-8th grade are still beyond them.

But as long as you can pay your tuition (and you can, thanks to Uncle Sam) you can find a University that will give you good grades and let you get drunk 3 times a week for four years to six years.  Good times.
 
2014-05-07 03:29:02 PM  

ITGreen: I dunno, seems easy enough.

[www.momdot.com image 662x424]


By the math I was taught (my God, that means I am getting older), I would have gone with 400 + 300 to estimate that, since both numbers were more than half to the next hundred.

700 is a lot closer to 645 than 500 is...

/NEW MATH!!
 
2014-05-07 03:29:12 PM  
So, every single one of them doesn't understand math a little more than 15x over?

That doesn't sound right.
 
2014-05-07 03:29:13 PM  
"We must reject educational stagnation in our high schools, and as a nation we must do better for all students, especially for African-American and Latino students," Duncan said in a statement.

We've been saying this for decades. It's not about rejecting anything, the problems are larger than the education system.
 
2014-05-07 03:29:15 PM  

meyerkev: meat0918: "Michael Petrilli, executive vice president at the conservative-leaning Thomas B. Fordham Institute, said it's unclear why younger students are doing better, but not high school seniors. "

Why?

Because it takes 13 years to teach a high school grad, from kindergarten to 12th grade.

You failed to inspire them back when they were younger students and failed to give them the support they needed to succeed.

You can't use one weird trick on a high school senior to motivate someone to study.  Those habits get set very early in their school life.

*sigh*

Example 1. There were 90 employees in a company last year. This year the number of employees increased by 10 percent. How many employees are in the company this year? (A) 9 (B) 81 (C) 91 (D) 99 (E) 100   By eighth grade, it would seem that almost everyone should be able to handle a question like this. Children are taught to divide and to calculate percentages in elementary school. Dividing by ten is the easiest form of division. Dividing a whole number by ten is easier yet. Adding a one-digit number (9) to a two-digit number (90) is elementary. It is a problem based on a simple mathematical concept, using simple arithmetic, requiring a simple logical interpolation to get the right answer. It is an excellent example for starting to think about what below average means in mathematics-because 62 percent of eighth-graders got this item wrong.

(And you figure a few guessed and got it right.  So I'm just going to call it 2/3rds)

Look...

Either our schools are notably more farked than anyone can imagine and somehow 2/3rds of students manage to get to 8th grade without learning how to add 10% to a number.

OR

2/3rds of students simply lack the ability.  They lack the ability to learn, retain (And having been a student recently, I think the retain is more critical.  Sure, I will NEVER get Cantor and infinites because my brain doesn't work that way, but I don't retain Newton beyond F=MA for very long because I don' ...


Or these are NCLB students and we're seeing the fallout from that backasswards policy
 
2014-05-07 03:30:06 PM  

meyerkev: Example 1. There were 90 employees in a company last year. This year the number of employees increased by 10 percent. How many employees are in the company this year? (A) 9 (B) 81 (C) 91 (D) 99 (E) 100   By eighth grade, it would seem that almost everyone should be able to handle a question like this. Children are taught to divide and to calculate percentages in elementary school. Dividing by ten is the easiest form of division. Dividing a whole number by ten is easier yet. Adding a one-digit number (9) to a two-digit number (90) is elementary. It is a problem based on a simple mathematical concept, using simple arithmetic, requiring a simple logical interpolation to get the right answer. It is an excellent example for starting to think about what below average means in mathematics-because 62 percent of eighth-graders got this item wrong.



I'm going to go out on a limb and say that at least 90% of the kids who got that question wrong answered E) 100, because instead of adding 10%, they added 10. It's not necessarily a failure to understand the concept (although that's probably part of it), but a failure to read and understand the question.
 
2014-05-07 03:30:10 PM  

apt311: ITGreen: I dunno, seems easy enough.

[www.momdot.com image 662x424]

By the math I was taught (my God, that means I am getting older), I would have gone with 400 + 300 to estimate that, since both numbers were more than half to the next hundred.

700 is a lot closer to 645 than 500 is...

/NEW MATH!!


Both are correct.
 
2014-05-07 03:30:19 PM  

meyerkev: Solty Dog: She is in fourth grade and they still haven't taught the complex number system.

You mean the a+bi thing?

So I was in a school system that was good enough to get mentioned in Time and Newsweek as a "model for the future of our schools" or words to that effect.  Rich kids, lots of Indians, de facto tracking, a quarter of the senior class took the BC Calculus exam and the average grade was a 4.

Uh, they sorta mentioned that in passing in Algebra 1 as a "Yeah, quadratic equations puke out weird results.  And here's some random crazy stuff".  And then periodically had us play with i-stuff when we redid quadratic equations.

Next time I really used it was in my college Differential Equations course, because they explained the XKCD comic.

Yeah, I wouldn't be worried.  Unless your kid is a 5-sigma kid is a class full of other 5-sigmas.  And then she'll be doing alright no matter what.   If she's good at math, you might try introducing it to her at some point on your own(like Mom introduced the concept of square roots to me so that when we got to multiplication in 3rd grade, squares and square roots in 4th and exponents in 5th, I'd been doing them in my head for 4-5 years, which was really nice because I had that intuitive knowledge that let me go fast), but yeah, don't be worried.

[imgs.xkcd.com image 400x481]


Ugh. Euler. Don't remind me of this.

Imaginary numbers can burn in hell.
 
2014-05-07 03:30:21 PM  
encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com

But can they maps?
 
2014-05-07 03:30:38 PM  

ITGreen: I dunno, seems easy enough.

[www.momdot.com image 662x424]


Let me guess. This is the newest thing being forwarded around Facebook as "common core math" by idiots who don't know what common core is, won't ask anyone who knows to explain it, don't want to hear the explanation anyway and didn't bother actually understand the question in the worksheet before spouting indignant outrage about it?

That about right?
 
2014-05-07 03:32:05 PM  
When they say 3/4th of seniors, do they mean ALL seniors or just the ones too stupid to avoid surveys like this? I'm pretty certain these "stupid student" polls cherry pick details just to make wide sweeping stupid statements like half of high school students can't find their state on a map. Crap like this has never helped with education and only serves to make news anchors sneer at the camera and weep for future generations.
 
2014-05-07 03:32:07 PM  
My SO is a dean at a university and she said that nearly half the incoming students need to take remedial courses in English and/or Math before they can take college level classes.

Why the fark are we giving them a High School diploma if they aren't ready for college courses? I know college isn't for everyone, but they should leave High School ready for college.

This is why I supplement my kids education via Aleks.com

My 6th grader is finishing up the 7th grade curriculum and my 3rd grader is doing the 4th.

It pays too, my kids are both among the best in their grade when it comes to math and the schools they go to are GT focused.
 
2014-05-07 03:34:01 PM  

apt311: By the math I was taught (my God, that means I am getting older), I would have gone with 400 + 300 to estimate that, since both numbers were more than half to the next hundred.


And you'd be right since the person who filled that out did it wrong.

Front end estimation is just rounding to the largest positional integers. There's nothing new or special about it all.
 
2014-05-07 03:35:47 PM  
So two decades of teaching to the test hasn't raised test scores at all.  When do you think they'll start actually teaching the kids down there and let the tests happen as they will?
 
2014-05-07 03:36:17 PM  

jst3p: My SO is a dean at a university and she said that nearly half the incoming students need to take remedial courses in English and/or Math before they can take college level classes.

Why the fark are we giving them a High School diploma if they aren't ready for college courses? I know college isn't for everyone, but they should leave High School ready for college.

This is why I supplement my kids education via Aleks.com

My 6th grader is finishing up the 7th grade curriculum and my 3rd grader is doing the 4th.

It pays too, my kids are both among the best in their grade when it comes to math and the schools they go to are GT focused.


A better question might be why is the college accepting people that need so much in the way of remedial studies?
 
2014-05-07 03:36:51 PM  

booksmrt: So two decades of teaching to the test hasn't haven't raised test scores at all.  When do you think they'll start actually teaching the kids down there and let the tests happen as they will?


Fixed that for myself...
 
2014-05-07 03:37:26 PM  

skozlaw: Let me guess. This is the newest thing being forwarded around Facebook as "common core math" by idiots who don't know what common core is


Oh!  Ma & Pa Kettle Math.
i1.ytimg.com
blogs.swa-jkt.com
blogs.swa-jkt.com
 
2014-05-07 03:37:39 PM  

meat0918: jst3p: My SO is a dean at a university and she said that nearly half the incoming students need to take remedial courses in English and/or Math before they can take college level classes.

Why the fark are we giving them a High School diploma if they aren't ready for college courses? I know college isn't for everyone, but they should leave High School ready for college.

This is why I supplement my kids education via Aleks.com

My 6th grader is finishing up the 7th grade curriculum and my 3rd grader is doing the 4th.

It pays too, my kids are both among the best in their grade when it comes to math and the schools they go to are GT focused.

A better question might be why is the college accepting people that need so much in the way of remedial studies?


Because they are 4.0 students with a high school diploma!
 
2014-05-07 03:39:01 PM  
I think common core is wrong, so let me cherry pick examples of shiatty, lowest-bidder content written to assess those standards as exemplars and then wharrgabl about them all day long.
 
2014-05-07 03:39:36 PM  

skozlaw: ITGreen: I dunno, seems easy enough.

[www.momdot.com image 662x424]

Let me guess. This is the newest thing being forwarded around Facebook as "common core math" by idiots who don't know what common core is, won't ask anyone who knows to explain it, don't want to hear the explanation anyway and didn't bother actually understand the question in the worksheet before spouting indignant outrage about it?

That about right?


Really I don't know, but my kneejerk is that why the hell are they teaching kids how to "reasonably estimate" in math? Math is about precision and exactitude.  Teaching how to "best guess" is like Englath or Mathglish or something.
 
2014-05-07 03:40:37 PM  

DubtodaIll: Really I don't know, but my kneejerk is that why the hell are they teaching kids how to "reasonably estimate" in math? Math is about precision and exactitude.  Teaching how to "best guess" is like Englath or Mathglish or something.


The reasonable guess is an internal robustness check: does the answer I generate through some other method plausible?
 
2014-05-07 03:40:45 PM  
s2.quickmeme.com
 
2014-05-07 03:41:12 PM  
Also does my english working?
 
2014-05-07 03:41:33 PM  

Arkanaut: I'm going to go out on a limb and say that at least 90% of the kids who got that question wrong answered E) 100, because instead of adding 10%, they added 10. It's not necessarily a failure to understand the concept (although that's probably part of it), but a failure to read and understand the question.


Possibly.

But does that really improve my interpretation?

So 2/3rds of kids were too stupid to read the question or too stupid to do the question (or didn't get that far on the test, or ...  For obvious reasons, it's basically impossible to get that breakdown).

That's really, really farked.  And I'm not sure if you can blame the teachers for that.
 
2014-05-07 03:41:43 PM  

meyerkev: Solty Dog: She is in fourth grade and they still haven't taught the complex number system.

You mean the a+bi thing?

So I was in a school system that was good enough to get mentioned in Time and Newsweek as a "model for the future of our schools" or words to that effect.  Rich kids, lots of Indians, de facto tracking, a quarter of the senior class took the BC Calculus exam and the average grade was a 4.

Uh, they sorta mentioned that in passing in Algebra 1 as a "Yeah, quadratic equations puke out weird results.  And here's some random crazy stuff".  And then periodically had us play with i-stuff when we redid quadratic equations.

Next time I really used it was in my college Differential Equations course, because they explained the XKCD comic.

Yeah, I wouldn't be worried.  Unless your kid is a 5-sigma kid is a class full of other 5-sigmas.  And then she'll be doing alright no matter what.   If she's good at math, you might try introducing it to her at some point on your own(like Mom introduced the concept of square roots to me so that when we got to multiplication in 3rd grade, squares and square roots in 4th and exponents in 5th, I'd been doing them in my head for 4-5 years, which was really nice because I had that intuitive knowledge that let me go fast), but yeah, don't be worried.

[imgs.xkcd.com image 400x481]


I went to a private catholic boarding school that tested you and placed you in different tracks according to your abilities.  So while someone might be a whiz in math but have poor language skills, you took math with other kids with the same abilities, and then your language skills were taught to your level with the idea of building you up to the next tier.

The process was so that classes were not taught to the least common denominator, causing quicker students to not get bored, and then not learn at all.

Arts, PE, and a handful of other classes were not in the track as to allow students of all tracks to socialize without bonding into groups based on their tracks.

It worked wonderfully and still does but god forbid you try and do that in a state run school.

I went to public high school one year and we had a kid who was mentally deficient(to put it nicely)  but his parents were attorneys and wanted their dimwit snowflake to go to regular high school and lawyered up.

Imagine sitting in Algebra class in the tenth grade with a guy with a snoopy metal lunchbox who played with matchbox cars....  True story.
 
2014-05-07 03:41:51 PM  

skozlaw: ITGreen: I dunno, seems easy enough.

[www.momdot.com image 662x424]

Let me guess. This is the newest thing being forwarded around Facebook as "common core math" by idiots who don't know what common core is, won't ask anyone who knows to explain it, don't want to hear the explanation anyway and didn't bother actually understand the question in the worksheet before spouting indignant outrage about it?

That about right?


The old way is always better.  We don't want our kids out smartin' us with their dang I-phones and their liberal hippie teachers and "new math" willy-nilly
 
2014-05-07 03:42:19 PM  

ITGreen: I dunno, seems easy enough.

[www.momdot.com image 662x424]


Please tell me that isn't from actual instructional material...
 
2014-05-07 03:42:57 PM  

DubtodaIll: skozlaw: ITGreen: I dunno, seems easy enough.

[www.momdot.com image 662x424]

Let me guess. This is the newest thing being forwarded around Facebook as "common core math" by idiots who don't know what common core is, won't ask anyone who knows to explain it, don't want to hear the explanation anyway and didn't bother actually understand the question in the worksheet before spouting indignant outrage about it?

That about right?

Really I don't know, but my kneejerk is that why the hell are they teaching kids how to "reasonably estimate" in math? Math is about precision and exactitude.  Teaching how to "best guess" is like Englath or Mathglish or something.


Estimating is a valid part of teaching math.
 
2014-05-07 03:42:59 PM  

Solty Dog: They really didn't even teacher her how an equation works. So when I was showing her how to manipulate it by doing something to both sides, she was amazed.


Ugh, same was true with me.  It wasn't until 6th grade that I was shown that this is allowed.

Even basic substitutions are beyond most adults.  I was helping someone (a pretty smart someone by the way) with a GMAT problem and it was a pretty gruesome looking equation with negative exponents but just one variable (x).  So I said the first step is set y = x^-2 to make the equation look more manageable.  The person I was tutoring asked "how do you know y = x^-2?"  I replied "because I said it is...you can do whatever you want as long as you change it back at the end" and it was really satisfying to see the light bulb go off.

/csb
 
2014-05-07 03:43:09 PM  
Our district puts calculators in kids' hands in the fourth grade.  The don't know math 'cause they never had to do it.  All they have learned is a recipe of which button with which symbol to push.

All of my colleagues and I have seen students multiply by one with a calculator.
 
2014-05-07 03:43:17 PM  

ph0rk: DubtodaIll: Really I don't know, but my kneejerk is that why the hell are they teaching kids how to "reasonably estimate" in math? Math is about precision and exactitude.  Teaching how to "best guess" is like Englath or Mathglish or something.

The reasonable guess is an internal robustness check: does the answer I generate through some other method plausible?


Yeah, what a waste of time, just learn how to actually do it with accuracy.
 
2014-05-07 03:43:29 PM  

meyerkev: meat0918: "Michael Petrilli, executive vice president at the conservative-leaning Thomas B. Fordham Institute, said it's unclear why younger students are doing better, but not high school seniors. "

Why?

Because it takes 13 years to teach a high school grad, from kindergarten to 12th grade.

You failed to inspire them back when they were younger students and failed to give them the support they needed to succeed.

You can't use one weird trick on a high school senior to motivate someone to study.  Those habits get set very early in their school life.

*sigh*

Example 1. There were 90 employees in a company last year. This year the number of employees increased by 10 percent. How many employees are in the company this year? (A) 9 (B) 81 (C) 91 (D) 99 (E) 100   By eighth grade, it would seem that almost everyone should be able to handle a question like this. Children are taught to divide and to calculate percentages in elementary school. Dividing by ten is the easiest form of division. Dividing a whole number by ten is easier yet. Adding a one-digit number (9) to a two-digit number (90) is elementary. It is a problem based on a simple mathematical concept, using simple arithmetic, requiring a simple logical interpolation to get the right answer. It is an excellent example for starting to think about what below average means in mathematics-because 62 percent of eighth-graders got this item wrong.

(And you figure a few guessed and got it right.  So I'm just going to call it 2/3rds)

Look...

Either our schools are notably more farked than anyone can imagine and somehow 2/3rds of students manage to get to 8th grade without learning how to add 10% to a number.

OR

2/3rds of students simply lack the ability.  They lack the ability to learn, retain (And having been a student recently, I think the retain is more critical.  Sure, I will NEVER get Cantor and infinites because my brain doesn't work that way, but I don't retain Newton beyond F=MA for very long because I don't use him on a day to day basis), and above all else USE all of the giant ball of facts in an interesting way fast enough to pass the test.  Because that takes internalization which takes time, practice, and ability, pick 2.5.  Lots of them.

So yeah, there's a limit to what people can learn.  And there's a limit to how fast.  Not saying that there aren't some *really* bad schools/teachers out there, but 2/3rds?  Wow, we're farked.  (Or alternatively, we've always been this farked, and the 1/3rd of people are just that awesome, and so we shouldn't be worried).

Look, an IQ of 70 is defined as too stupid to know that murder is wrong.  So:

* What's the point where you can't learn algebra period?  (And if you want, algebra -> calculus/P=NP/Cantorian infinites/Quantum Bullshiat).
* What's the point where you can't learn and retain all of algebra as fast as anticipated?
* What's the point where you definitely can't keep up in the class full of Einsteins?  Because they're just smarter than you.


If you assume that every person who got the answer wrong had no idea what it was and guessed randomly, then if 62% got it wrong, you'd expect roughly 15% to get it right by guessing despite not knowing the answer. Leaving less than 25% of students in the "actually knew the right answer" category.
 
2014-05-07 03:43:29 PM  

Solty Dog: The main problem with math courses is they don't teach them the fundamentals and build from there. My kid is expected to memorize addition, subtraction and multiplication problems, but not the why.

She is in fourth grade and they still haven't taught the complex number system.


4th grade might be too young for complex numbers.
 
2014-05-07 03:44:09 PM  

Odd Bird: ITGreen: I dunno, seems easy enough.

[www.momdot.com image 662x424]

Please tell me that isn't from actual instructional material...


There is no official common core material, only content created from question mills like Pearson and intended to fit the standards. They pay something like $10 an hour to generate hundred of items per day - supposedly there are some validations steps before it goes out, but then again the image in question is probably from an even shiattier company.
 
2014-05-07 03:44:12 PM  
1,527.34¾% ?  That's almost half!
 
2014-05-07 03:44:36 PM  
skozlaw:
Let me guess. This is the newest thing being forwarded around Facebook as "common core math" by idiots who don't know what common core is, won't ask anyone who knows to explain it, don't want to hear the explanation anyway and didn't bother actually understand the question in the worksheet before spouting indignant outrage about it?

That about right?


Not really. There have been so many "latest" Common Core stupid examples that they've pretty much used up the whole curriculum at this point.

One of the funniest ways to kill time is ask a Common Core supporter to solve one of the math problems. No, I'm not talking about the parents who think it's a good idea because they got a letter from the school telling them how great it is - I'm talking about the people who are SELLING Common Core. Ask one of them to solve that problem in real time without a cheat sheet. They'll get that delicious "deer in headlights" look, then get the answer spectacularly wrong.

Oh - and don't forget to support the idea that getting a wrong answer would still get you marked correct if you could explain your reasoning. For example, 3x4=11 in Common Core, if you can BS well enough.
 
2014-05-07 03:46:08 PM  

Solty Dog: meyerkev: You mean the a+bi thing?

Yes. I am trying to help her in math and find myself having to explain concepts behind everything. They really didn't even teacher her how an equation works. So when I was showing her how to manipulate it by doing something to both sides, she was amazed.


Complex numbers, and the sqrt(-1), aren't needed for most equations.
I'm not sure you're using the right term when you say complex numbers.
 
2014-05-07 03:46:25 PM  

cirby: skozlaw:
Let me guess. This is the newest thing being forwarded around Facebook as "common core math" by idiots who don't know what common core is, won't ask anyone who knows to explain it, don't want to hear the explanation anyway and didn't bother actually understand the question in the worksheet before spouting indignant outrage about it?

That about right?

Not really. There have been so many "latest" Common Core stupid examples that they've pretty much used up the whole curriculum at this point.

One of the funniest ways to kill time is ask a Common Core supporter to solve one of the math problems. No, I'm not talking about the parents who think it's a good idea because they got a letter from the school telling them how great it is - I'm talking about the people who are SELLING Common Core. Ask one of them to solve that problem in real time without a cheat sheet. They'll get that delicious "deer in headlights" look, then get the answer spectacularly wrong.

Oh - and don't forget to support the idea that getting a wrong answer would still get you marked correct if you could explain your reasoning. For example, 3x4=11 in Common Core, if you can BS well enough.


Spoken like a person that doesn't know what the fark they're talking about.

How about you go read the standards and come back with specific standards you don't like.

Difficulty: The standards, not some 3rd party assessment tool.
 
2014-05-07 03:47:07 PM  

RumsfeldsReplacement: Solty Dog: They really didn't even teacher her how an equation works. So when I was showing her how to manipulate it by doing something to both sides, she was amazed.

Ugh, same was true with me.  It wasn't until 6th grade that I was shown that this is allowed.

Even basic substitutions are beyond most adults.  I was helping someone (a pretty smart someone by the way) with a GMAT problem and it was a pretty gruesome looking equation with negative exponents but just one variable (x).  So I said the first step is set y = x^-2 to make the equation look more manageable.  The person I was tutoring asked "how do you know y = x^-2?"  I replied "because I said it is...you can do whatever you want as long as you change it back at the end" and it was really satisfying to see the light bulb go on.

/csb


FTFM
 
2014-05-07 03:47:08 PM  

cirby: skozlaw:
Let me guess. This is the newest thing being forwarded around Facebook as "common core math" by idiots who don't know what common core is, won't ask anyone who knows to explain it, don't want to hear the explanation anyway and didn't bother actually understand the question in the worksheet before spouting indignant outrage about it?

That about right?

Not really. There have been so many "latest" Common Core stupid examples that they've pretty much used up the whole curriculum at this point.

One of the funniest ways to kill time is ask a Common Core supporter to solve one of the math problems. No, I'm not talking about the parents who think it's a good idea because they got a letter from the school telling them how great it is - I'm talking about the people who are SELLING Common Core. Ask one of them to solve that problem in real time without a cheat sheet. They'll get that delicious "deer in headlights" look, then get the answer spectacularly wrong.

Oh - and don't forget to support the idea that getting a wrong answer would still get you marked correct if you could explain your reasoning. For example, 3x4=11 in Common Core, if you can BS well enough.


The only significant thing I know about Common Core is that the right wing radio stations I listen to hate it.

That tells me it is probably a good thing.
 
2014-05-07 03:48:15 PM  

jst3p: DubtodaIll: skozlaw: ITGreen: I dunno, seems easy enough.

[www.momdot.com image 662x424]

Let me guess. This is the newest thing being forwarded around Facebook as "common core math" by idiots who don't know what common core is, won't ask anyone who knows to explain it, don't want to hear the explanation anyway and didn't bother actually understand the question in the worksheet before spouting indignant outrage about it?

That about right?

Really I don't know, but my kneejerk is that why the hell are they teaching kids how to "reasonably estimate" in math? Math is about precision and exactitude.  Teaching how to "best guess" is like Englath or Mathglish or something.

Estimating is a valid part of teaching math.


I've taken a lot of math, and estimating was never mentioned.
I would look at the addition problem and "estimate" the sum to be 645.
 
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