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(SFGate)   Keep using that shampoo and you soon won't have hair to wash   (blog.sfgate.com ) divider line
    More: Scary, personal care products, shampoos, Colgate-Palmolive, legal settlements, Alameda County Superior Court, Center for Environmental Health, conservation movement  
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14588 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 May 2014 at 2:32 PM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-05-07 12:20:48 PM  
In August, the Oakland environmental group filed lawsuits against companies selling products that contain cocamide DEA without a health warning required by the state's Proposition 65.

Oh, Jesus Tapdancing Christ....

I'm certain that this substance isn't great, but here are some other things in California required to post Prop 65 warnings:

* Parking lots
* Restaurants
* Coffee houses

Seriously, the law was written so broadly that there isn't anywhere you can go that there isn't a Prop 65 warning posted somewhere. Finding the warning posted in completely innocuous settings has turned into a running gag. Instead of being a useful consumer tool, it's the "Where's Waldo?" of the California commercial landscape.
 
2014-05-07 02:34:27 PM  
there are lots of alternatives! lots of shampoos that don't have this ingredient anyway.
 
2014-05-07 02:35:23 PM  
Didn't see "$1.50 Large Bottle of Coconut Scented Suave" listed so I'm good.
 
2014-05-07 02:36:12 PM  
Shampoo is bullshiat anyway. Just makes your scalp over-produce oils so you're caught in a neverending cycle of removing it.

Unless i'm doing something particularly filthy just rinsing my hair daily has always been enough. When it was longer people used to always compliment me on how healthy it looked, even women. Could never tell them my terrible secret.
 
2014-05-07 02:36:23 PM  
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-05-07 02:36:24 PM  
Who's their chemist, the Joker?

/smilex! Guaranteed to leave you smiling!
 
2014-05-07 02:38:01 PM  
All things in moderation.

Including my cocamide DEA tequila cocktails.
 
2014-05-07 02:39:08 PM  
I didn't see Lava Soap, so I'm good.  And bald.  And kinda bloody.  Oh well.  First healing and then hair.
 
2014-05-07 02:39:25 PM  

Gene Masseth Jr.: Didn't see "$1.50 Large Bottle of Coconut Scented Suave" listed so I'm good.




That's what I use. The conditioner anyway. If this had just been shampoos it would've been no big deal for me, I've been washing my hair with just conditioner for about a year and a half now. Gonna go check anyway. One more goddamn ingredient to skim labels for (you wouldn't believe how hard it is to avoid silicones that aren't water soluble).

/healthiest hair I've ever had
//no scalp buildup or oil even a week after washing it
///no split ends and hair is finally curling the way it wants to
 
2014-05-07 02:40:33 PM  

J. Frank Parnell: Shampoo is bullshiat anyway. Just makes your scalp over-produce oils so you're caught in a neverending cycle of removing it.

Unless i'm doing something particularly filthy just rinsing my hair daily has always been enough. When it was longer people used to always compliment me on how healthy it looked, even women. Could never tell them my terrible secret.


You sound smelly.
 
2014-05-07 02:41:21 PM  
Here's another environmental concern to be aware of: Your shampoo or body wash may contain a cancer-causing chemical called cocamide DEA.

So, the next time the DEA swings by my house because of my hydroponic hobby, I can shoot them 'cause I don't want to catch the cancer from them, right?
 
2014-05-07 02:43:41 PM  
Never mind. From PaulsaChoice.com:

"Colorless liquid used as a solvent and pH adjuster. Also used as a lather agent in skin- and hair-care products when coupled with a foaming or detergent cleansing agent. In 1999 the National Toxicology Program (NTP) completed a study that found an association between cancer and tumors in laboratory animals and the application of diethanolamine (DEA) and certain DEA-related ingredients to their skin (Sources: Study #TR-478, Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Diethanolamine, CAS No. 111-42-2, July 1999-http://ntp-server.niehs.nih.gov/; and Food Chemistry and Toxicology, January 2004, pages 127-134). For the DEA-related ingredients, the NTP study suggested that the carcinogenic response is linked to possible residual levels of DEA. However, the NTP study did not establish a link between DEA and the risk of cancer in humans. According to the FDA (Source: Office of Cosmetics and Colors Fact Sheet, December 9, 1999), "Although DEA itself is used in very few cosmetics, DEA-related ingredients (e.g., oleamide DEA, lauramide DEA, cocamide DEA) are widely used in a variety of cosmetic products. These ingredients function as emulsifiers or foaming agents and are generally used at levels of 1% to 5%. The FDA takes these NTP findings very seriously and is in the process of carefully evaluating the studies and test data to determine the real risk, if any, to consumers. The Agency believes that at the present time there is no reason for consumers to be alarmed based on the usage of these ingredients in cosmetics. Consumers wishing to avoid cosmetics containing DEA or its conjugates may do so by reviewing the ingredient statement required to appear on the outer container label of cosmetics offered for retail sale to consumers." A study from 1999 on the potential effects of DEA involved applying a pure concentration of this ingredient directly to mouse skin for a period of 14 weeks (minimum) and 2 years (maximum). The study reported no evidence of carcinogenicity when low doses (50-100 mg per kilogram of body weight) were used. Internal changes to organs (liver, kidneys) and external signs (inflammation, ulcers) were found as the dosages of DEA increased (up to 800 mg was used) (Source: National Toxicology Program Technical Report Service, volume 478, July 1999, pages 134-212). Although the results of this study are interesting, it is still unrelated to how DEA is used in cosmetics products and how consumers use them. In most instances, our contact with DEA in any form is brief, and most likely is not cause for alarm."
 
2014-05-07 02:44:19 PM  
She loves to run her fingers through my air.
 
2014-05-07 02:44:47 PM  

J. Frank Parnell: Unless i'm doing something particularly filthy just rinsing my hair daily has always been enough. When it was longer people used to always compliment me on how healthy it looked, even women. Could never tell them my terrible secret.


They could tell your terrible scent, though.
 
2014-05-07 02:45:04 PM  

BKITU: In August, the Oakland environmental group filed lawsuits against companies selling products that contain cocamide DEA without a health warning required by the state's Proposition 65.

Oh, Jesus Tapdancing Christ....

I'm certain that this substance isn't great, but here are some other things in California required to post Prop 65 warnings:

* Parking lots
* Restaurants
* Coffee houses

Seriously, the law was written so broadly that there isn't anywhere you can go that there isn't a Prop 65 warning posted somewhere. Finding the warning posted in completely innocuous settings has turned into a running gag. Instead of being a useful consumer tool, it's the "Where's Waldo?" of the California commercial landscape.


We used to joke that my friend's building had that sign because of all the drugs he had around his apartment.
 
2014-05-07 02:45:55 PM  

doloresonthedottedline: Gene Masseth Jr.: Didn't see "$1.50 Large Bottle of Coconut Scented Suave" listed so I'm good.

That's what I use. The conditioner anyway. If this had just been shampoos it would've been no big deal for me, I've been washing my hair with just conditioner for about a year and a half now. Gonna go check anyway. One more goddamn ingredient to skim labels for (you wouldn't believe how hard it is to avoid silicones that aren't water soluble).

/healthiest hair I've ever had
//no scalp buildup or oil even a week after washing it
///no split ends and hair is finally curling the way it wants to


Also what I use.

/Love the smell of coconut in the morning
//Let's make this a "$1.50 Large Bottle of Coconut Scented Suave" Thread
///or not.
 
2014-05-07 02:46:12 PM  
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-05-07 02:47:30 PM  
I'm fairly certain that even this brand of soap has the chemical in question, although the chemical is coming from a natural source, it is still the same exact chemical.

pre.cloudfront.goodinc.com
 
2014-05-07 02:48:01 PM  
Don't use any shampoo at all and you'll like like Shirley Phelps.

pbs.twimg.com
 
2014-05-07 02:48:11 PM  
Wash your hair with beer:

img.fark.net
 
2014-05-07 02:49:24 PM  

Gene Masseth Jr.: Didn't see "$1.50 Large Bottle of Coconut Scented Suave" listed so I'm good.


Go to the dollar store, they have whole aisles of this shiat
 
2014-05-07 02:53:37 PM  

BKITU: In August, the Oakland environmental group filed lawsuits against companies selling products that contain cocamide DEA without a health warning required by the state's Proposition 65.

Oh, Jesus Tapdancing Christ....

I'm certain that this substance isn't great, but here are some other things in California required to post Prop 65 warnings:

* Parking lots
* Restaurants
* Coffee houses

Seriously, the law was written so broadly that there isn't anywhere you can go that there isn't a Prop 65 warning posted somewhere. Finding the warning posted in completely innocuous settings has turned into a running gag. Instead of being a useful consumer tool, it's the "Where's Waldo?" of the California commercial landscape.


But ...

FTFA - The Center for Environmental Health has ongoing lawsuits against more than 100 companies. You can see the complete list.

Prop 65 sounds like a cash cow.  (That's some Prop, that Prop 65 ...)
 
2014-05-07 02:54:37 PM  
That's why I only use real poo.
 
2014-05-07 02:56:40 PM  

Mikeyworld: Gene Masseth Jr.: Didn't see "$1.50 Large Bottle of Coconut Scented Suave" listed so I'm good.

Go to the dollar store, they have whole aisles of this shiat




The Wild Cherry Suave Naturals is good too. Although when I used it instead my mom said I still smelled like the beach and thought I still smelled like coconut. So either I have weird sweat glands or they don't smell that different.

/coconut naturals conditioner has protein in it
//other scents do not
///for some people that apparently can make a huge difference
 
2014-05-07 02:58:27 PM  

MooseBayou: BKITU: In August, the Oakland environmental group filed lawsuits against companies selling products that contain cocamide DEA without a health warning required by the state's Proposition 65.

Oh, Jesus Tapdancing Christ....

I'm certain that this substance isn't great, but here are some other things in California required to post Prop 65 warnings:

* Parking lots
* Restaurants
* Coffee houses

Seriously, the law was written so broadly that there isn't anywhere you can go that there isn't a Prop 65 warning posted somewhere. Finding the warning posted in completely innocuous settings has turned into a running gag. Instead of being a useful consumer tool, it's the "Where's Waldo?" of the California commercial landscape.

But ...

FTFA - The Center for Environmental Health has ongoing lawsuits against more than 100 companies. You can see the complete list.

Prop 65 sounds like a cash cow.  (That's some Prop, that Prop 65 ...)


This thread contains words known to the State of California to cause cancer.
 
2014-05-07 03:01:23 PM  

doloresonthedottedline: Gene Masseth Jr.: Didn't see "$1.50 Large Bottle of Coconut Scented Suave" listed so I'm good.

That's what I use. The conditioner anyway. If this had just been shampoos it would've been no big deal for me, I've been washing my hair with just conditioner for about a year and a half now. Gonna go check anyway. One more goddamn ingredient to skim labels for (you wouldn't believe how hard it is to avoid silicones that aren't water soluble).

/healthiest hair I've ever had
//no scalp buildup or oil even a week after washing it
///no split ends and hair is finally curling the way it wants to


Is the Suave silicon-free? I use Tresemme Naturals, because the wife uses Tresemme.

Wouldn't mind a little coconut aroma, though.
 
2014-05-07 03:02:51 PM  

Jeng: I'm fairly certain that even this brand of soap has the chemical in question, although the chemical is coming from a natural source, it is still the same exact chemical.

[pre.cloudfront.goodinc.com image 450x304]


I can damn near guarantee they use lye as well as caustic potash during production.  Oils don't saponify into soaps by themselves, but it probably doesn't have the cocamide DEA in it, because you have to actually try to make it first by adding diethanolamine to the coconut oil fatty acids.

But that lye and caustic potash?  That shiat burns.

Amazing what you can hide in a label, isn't it?
 
2014-05-07 03:08:35 PM  
I am going to open a bar in Cali and call it Proposition 65
 
2014-05-07 03:10:40 PM  
I only wash my hair with Steel Reserve 211.

/it's my go-to brew. Leaves the scalp fresh and clean.
 
2014-05-07 03:15:09 PM  
not bloody likely.  I'm Italian and come from a long time of hairy men.  I think my hair grows from my bones.
 
2014-05-07 03:15:38 PM  
I make my own shampoo and soap boiling fatback in a kettle.
 
2014-05-07 03:19:51 PM  
Eh, I use Prell.

Judging by the color, it's made from liquid depleted uranium anyway...
 
2014-05-07 03:20:33 PM  

Gonz: doloresonthedottedline: Gene Masseth Jr.: Didn't see "$1.50 Large Bottle of Coconut Scented Suave" listed so I'm good.

That's what I use. The conditioner anyway. If this had just been shampoos it would've been no big deal for me, I've been washing my hair with just conditioner for about a year and a half now. Gonna go check anyway. One more goddamn ingredient to skim labels for (you wouldn't believe how hard it is to avoid silicones that aren't water soluble).

/healthiest hair I've ever had
//no scalp buildup or oil even a week after washing it
///no split ends and hair is finally curling the way it wants to

Is the Suave silicon-free? I use Tresemme Naturals, because the wife uses Tresemme.

Wouldn't mind a little coconut aroma, though.




Yup. Suave Naturals are pretty basic and great, and super cheap. I'd been using cleansing conditioners and someone got me a Wen gift set, and none were as good as just plain old Suave conditioner. And you don't have to feel bad about using a ton if you have long hair because it's cheaper than most soft drinks.
 
2014-05-07 03:21:08 PM  

brandent: his thread contains words known to the State of California to cause cancer.


I'm sure there are areas of California where radon or uranium is naturally occurring? Which means that California contains ingredients known to the state of California to cause cancer.

/California
 
2014-05-07 03:25:20 PM  

doloresonthedottedline: Never mind. From PaulsaChoice.com:

"Colorless liquid used as a solvent and pH adjuster. Also used as a lather agent in skin- and hair-care products when coupled with a foaming or detergent cleansing agent. In 1999 the National Toxicology Program (NTP) completed a study that found an association between cancer and tumors in laboratory animals and the application of diethanolamine (DEA) and certain DEA-related ingredients to their skin (Sources: Study #TR-478, Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Diethanolamine, CAS No. 111-42-2, July 1999-http://ntp-server.niehs.nih.gov/; and Food Chemistry and Toxicology, January 2004, pages 127-134). For the DEA-related ingredients, the NTP study suggested that the carcinogenic response is linked to possible residual levels of DEA. However, the NTP study did not establish a link between DEA and the risk of cancer in humans. According to the FDA (Source: Office of Cosmetics and Colors Fact Sheet, December 9, 1999), "Although DEA itself is used in very few cosmetics, DEA-related ingredients (e.g., oleamide DEA, lauramide DEA, cocamide DEA) are widely used in a variety of cosmetic products. These ingredients function as emulsifiers or foaming agents and are generally used at levels of 1% to 5%. The FDA takes these NTP findings very seriously and is in the process of carefully evaluating the studies and test data to determine the real risk, if any, to consumers. The Agency believes that at the present time there is no reason for consumers to be alarmed based on the usage of these ingredients in cosmetics. Consumers wishing to avoid cosmetics containing DEA or its conjugates may do so by reviewing the ingredient statement required to appear on the outer container label of cosmetics offered for retail sale to consumers." A study from 1999 on the potential effects of DEA involved applying a pure concentration of this ingredient directly to mouse skin for a period of 14 weeks (minimum) and 2 years (maximum). The study reported no evid ...


So this is a prop 65 ingredient on the off chance that someone out there is putting a pint of shampoo in their hair daily and leaving it?
 
2014-05-07 03:26:21 PM  

BKITU: In August, the Oakland environmental group filed lawsuits against companies selling products that contain cocamide DEA without a health warning required by the state's Proposition 65.

Oh, Jesus Tapdancing Christ....

I'm certain that this substance isn't great, but here are some other things in California required to post Prop 65 warnings:

* Parking lots
* Restaurants
* Coffee houses

Seriously, the law was written so broadly that there isn't anywhere you can go that there isn't a Prop 65 warning posted somewhere. Finding the warning posted in completely innocuous settings has turned into a running gag. Instead of being a useful consumer tool, it's the "Where's Waldo?" of the California commercial landscape.


img.4plebs.org
 
2014-05-07 03:28:00 PM  
doloresonthedottedline: ... A study from 1999 on the potential effects of DEA involved applying a pure concentration of this ingredient directly to mouse skin for a period of 14 weeks (minimum) and 2 years (maximum). The study reported no evidence of carcinogenicity when low doses (50-100 mg per kilogram of body weight) were used...

... Although the results of this study are interesting, it is still unrelated to how DEA is used in cosmetics products and how consumers use them. In most instances, our contact with DEA in any form is brief, and most likely is not cause for alarm."

These are the 2 most excerpts from that study.  The first states that CONCENTRATED and PROLONGED exposure caused negative effects in animals.  The second states that humans get NEITHER prolonged exposure, NOR concentrated amounts.

This is "facebook story" (previously "email forward from aunt Edna") reactionism.  NOTHING is poisonous in and of itself.  Not even ricin, strychnine, arsenic, or mustard gas.  What IS poisonous (or carcinogenic or unhealthy or ...)  is the DOSAGE.  The dosage is the key.  Not even nuclear radiation** is carcinogenic on its own.  We absorb radiation everyday and have for the 2 million years Homo Sapiens have been on this planet without any measurable effect.  If we absorb large amounts of radiation, THEN it becomes carcinogenic.

Moderation is the key for all forms of consumption (from food, to chemicals, to alcohol, to ...).  The poison is in the dosage.

**yes, I'm aware there is no such thing as "nuclear radiation".  I'm lumping in alpha, beta, and gamma into 1 general term
 
2014-05-07 03:39:43 PM  

abmoraz: doloresonthedottedline: ... A study from 1999 on the potential effects of DEA involved applying a pure concentration of this ingredient directly to mouse skin for a period of 14 weeks (minimum) and 2 years (maximum). The study reported no evidence of carcinogenicity when low doses (50-100 mg per kilogram of body weight) were used...

... Although the results of this study are interesting, it is still unrelated to how DEA is used in cosmetics products and how consumers use them. In most instances, our contact with DEA in any form is brief, and most likely is not cause for alarm."

These are the 2 most excerpts from that study.  The first states that CONCENTRATED and PROLONGED exposure caused negative effects in animals.  The second states that humans get NEITHER prolonged exposure, NOR concentrated amounts.

This is "facebook story" (previously "email forward from aunt Edna") reactionism.  NOTHING is poisonous in and of itself.  Not even ricin, strychnine, arsenic, or mustard gas.  What IS poisonous (or carcinogenic or unhealthy or ...)  is the DOSAGE.  The dosage is the key.  Not even nuclear radiation** is carcinogenic on its own.  We absorb radiation everyday and have for the 2 million years Homo Sapiens have been on this planet without any measurable effect.  If we absorb large amounts of radiation, THEN it becomes carcinogenic.

Moderation is the key for all forms of consumption (from food, to chemicals, to alcohol, to ...).  The poison is in the dosage.

**yes, I'm aware there is no such thing as "nuclear radiation".  I'm lumping in alpha, beta, and gamma into 1 general term




Pretty much.

Also, I highly recommend paulaschoice.com to anyone who wants to see a good summary of the science of cosmetic ingredients. Has a full ingredient dictionary that cites studies and goes into how different ingredients actually work, and has a huge database of cosmetics and skincare products rated on whether their ingredients do what they say and whether or not they contain irritants, etc.
 
2014-05-07 03:44:04 PM  
Plain old baking soda makes a great shampoo. Removes excess oils without completely stripping the hair/scalp and is dirt cheap.
 
2014-05-07 03:47:39 PM  
I just use the bar of soap I'm using in the shower. Can't remember the last time I bought any shampoo.
 
2014-05-07 03:52:26 PM  

albert71292: I just use the bar of soap I'm using in the shower. Can't remember the last time I bought any shampoo.


Apparently there are a lot of straight-haired dudes in this thread. Or really short hair, I guess.
 
2014-05-07 03:54:26 PM  

abmoraz: doloresonthedottedline: ... A study from 1999 on the potential effects of DEA involved applying a pure concentration of this ingredient directly to mouse skin for a period of 14 weeks (minimum) and 2 years (maximum). The study reported no evidence of carcinogenicity when low doses (50-100 mg per kilogram of body weight) were used...

[seriously redacted]...The first states that CONCENTRATED and PROLONGED exposure caused negative effects in animals.  The second states that humans get NEITHER prolonged exposure, NOR concentrated amounts.

What IS poisonous (or carcinogenic or unhealthy or ...)  is the DOSAGE.  The dosage is the key.  Not even nuclear radiation** is carcinogenic on its own. [more redaction]  If we absorb large amounts of radiation, THEN it becomes carcinogenic.

Moderation is the key for all forms of consumption (from food, to chemicals, to alcohol, to ...).  The poison is in the dosage.

So, I have no worries about Fukishima

bananation here on the coast of Washington...even though the boats are floating up on the beach?
 
2014-05-07 03:55:57 PM  
Where'd that space come from?  GAH! *Fukishima bananation* is what I was sayin', son.
 
2014-05-07 04:10:25 PM  

Mikeyworld: Where'd that space come from?  GAH! *Fukishima bananation* is what I was sayin', son.


In my opinion, No...

BUT...

I am not a dosimeter.  If you are truly concerned, buy one off eBay or Amazon.  You can get personal ones for under $100.  Just make sure they are radiation ones and not the ones for noise or electromagnetic (or the really crappy "ghost hunting" pieces of marketing crap).

/if you have granite counters or flooring in your home or office, they are more likely to expose you to more radiation than you'll ever see from Fukushima
 
2014-05-07 04:10:39 PM  
I wash my hair with the tears of Progressive Libtards
 
2014-05-07 04:11:18 PM  

Mikeyworld: Where'd that space come from?  GAH! *Fukishima bananation* is what I was sayin', son.


"bananation"?  Is that a new fark filter I'm unaware of?
 
2014-05-07 04:16:21 PM  
Getting a kick.

/allergic to coconut
 
2014-05-07 04:35:33 PM  

abmoraz: Mikeyworld: Where'd that space come from?  GAH! *Fukishima bananation* is what I was sayin', son.

"bananation"?  Is that a new fark filter I'm unaware of?


www.hrwiki.org
 
2014-05-07 04:53:01 PM  
Hey Subby, cancer doesn't make your hair fall out.
 
2014-05-07 05:13:41 PM  

halfpastnvr: Wash your hair with beer:

[img.fark.net image 120x410]


img.fark.net

Family has used that a lot. They had surplus everywhere when I was a kid. Love the smell.
 
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