If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(USGS)   Oklahoma tornado advisory, get in your basement. Oh.. Oklahoma earthquake advisory, get out of your basement   (usgs.gov) divider line 41
    More: Interesting  
•       •       •

814 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 May 2014 at 2:11 PM (11 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



41 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-05-06 01:19:02 PM
We don't have basements
 
2014-05-06 02:13:27 PM

The Stealth Hippopotamus: We don't have basements


Of course not, what with all the earthquakes.

/I know the basement-dissuading geology of Oklahoma
//subby knows too
///subby
 
2014-05-06 02:18:29 PM
If it ain't greater than a 4.5, it ain't a real quake.

/Californian
 
2014-05-06 02:19:08 PM

WelldeadLink: The Stealth Hippopotamus: We don't have basements

Of course not, what with all the earthquakes.

/I know the basement-dissuading geology of Oklahoma
//subby knows too
///subby


What is the nature of this dissuading geology?
(genuinely curious)
 
2014-05-06 02:28:29 PM

Odd Bird: WelldeadLink: The Stealth Hippopotamus: We don't have basements

Of course not, what with all the earthquakes.

/I know the basement-dissuading geology of Oklahoma
//subby knows too
///subby

What is the nature of this dissuading geology?
(genuinely curious)


Short answer: clay in the soil and a high water table
 
2014-05-06 02:31:41 PM

Odd Bird: WelldeadLink: The Stealth Hippopotamus: We don't have basements

Of course not, what with all the earthquakes.

/I know the basement-dissuading geology of Oklahoma
//subby knows too
///subby

What is the nature of this dissuading geology?
(genuinely curious)


GIS of "basement-dissuading geology of Oklahoma" brings up this thread.
Also, a link to a conceal/carry permit distribution map(?).

Curious as well.
 
2014-05-06 02:31:48 PM

StRalphTheLiar: Odd Bird: WelldeadLink: The Stealth Hippopotamus: We don't have basements

Of course not, what with all the earthquakes.

/I know the basement-dissuading geology of Oklahoma
//subby knows too
///subby

What is the nature of this dissuading geology?
(genuinely curious)

Short answer: clay in the soil and a high water table


Thanks, I thought "must be ground water" after posting the question.
Though I would think clay would be good, basements are common in GA and the clay is pretty farkin' tough.
 
2014-05-06 02:32:43 PM

StRalphTheLiar: Odd Bird: WelldeadLink: The Stealth Hippopotamus: We don't have basements

Of course not, what with all the earthquakes.

/I know the basement-dissuading geology of Oklahoma
//subby knows too
///subby

What is the nature of this dissuading geology?
(genuinely curious)

Short answer: clay in the soil and a high water table


Too slow.
Makes sense.
Thanks.
 
2014-05-06 02:40:46 PM

RoyFokker'sGhost: If it ain't greater than a 4.5, it ain't a real quake.

/Californian


Last year I felt a 4.5 that rattled the walls, picture frames and closet doors for a good 6-10 seconds.  We don't build for earthquakes here, so I shudder to imagine the damage that would be caused by a *real* quake in Oklahoma.
 
2014-05-06 02:42:07 PM

StRalphTheLiar: Odd Bird: WelldeadLink: The Stealth Hippopotamus: We don't have basements

Of course not, what with all the earthquakes.

/I know the basement-dissuading geology of Oklahoma
//subby knows too
///subby

What is the nature of this dissuading geology?
(genuinely curious)

Short answer: clay in the soil and a high water table


I know the Geology might be different in the southern Arbuckles, but I see a good number of buried storm shelters. Of course, I only see them driving the back country bewteen casinos.
 
2014-05-06 02:44:48 PM

SansNeural: RoyFokker'sGhost: If it ain't greater than a 4.5, it ain't a real quake.

/Californian

Last year I felt a 4.5 that rattled the walls, picture frames and closet doors for a good 6-10 seconds.  We don't build for earthquakes here, so I shudder to imagine the damage that would be caused by a *real* quake in Oklahoma.


In some parts of the state? Improvement.

The downtown areas of he major cities would be farked, though.
 
2014-05-06 02:46:19 PM

SansNeural: RoyFokker'sGhost: If it ain't greater than a 4.5, it ain't a real quake.

/Californian

Last year I felt a 4.5 that rattled the walls, picture frames and closet doors for a good 6-10 seconds.  We don't build for earthquakes here, so I shudder to imagine the damage that would be caused by a *real* quake in Oklahoma.


I know, and I really do feel for the Midwest if a quake hits. Every region has its own natural disasters that they're used to and I have a lot of respect for someone in the Midwest or East Coast dealing with a quake because they're so infrequent there.
 
2014-05-06 02:48:08 PM

RoyFokker'sGhost: If it ain't greater than a 4.5, it ain't a real quake.

/Californian


Right.  These 3.0 tremors are interesting to geologists, though, and the fact that there have been 183 of them in half a year when there would normally be 2 per year is interesting.  In the "may you live in interesting times" sense.

Or are you one of those Republicans who thinks studying volcanoes and earthquakes is pointless?
 
2014-05-06 02:48:40 PM
In 2004, the Oklahoma Geological Survey measured 66 Earthquakes.

Ten years later, only into the 5th month of the year, they've measured 1843 quakes.

Source
 
2014-05-06 02:50:32 PM

RoyFokker'sGhost: If it ain't greater than a 4.5, it ain't a real quake.

/Californian


Depending on the type of rock, even a small quake can be felt a long distance away. See the 2011 Virginia quake, which was felt up here in Connecticut, and swayed buildings in Boston.
 
2014-05-06 02:51:44 PM

StRalphTheLiar: Short answer: clay in the soil and a high water table


Oh, that must make septic tanks and drainfields interesting as well.

/Can usually get away with one for each farmhouse, but then more people start moving into the area, but not enough to have any sort of municipal sanitation...
 
2014-05-06 02:54:15 PM

flondrix: RoyFokker'sGhost: If it ain't greater than a 4.5, it ain't a real quake.

/Californian

Right.  These 3.0 tremors are interesting to geologists, though, and the fact that there have been 183 of them in half a year when there would normally be 2 per year is interesting.  In the "may you live in interesting times" sense.


Precisely.  Again covering the last decade: in 2004 we had 2 quakes 3.0 or greater magnitude.  To date this year we've had 156.
 
2014-05-06 03:04:11 PM
Oklahoma residents. Frack this shiat, I'm leaving.

Oklahoma native American tribes. Eh, not so much.
 
2014-05-06 03:04:29 PM
Quit hitting the earthquake button you chucklefark
 
2014-05-06 03:04:55 PM

Kuta: Oklahoma residents. Frack this shiat, I'm leaving.

Oklahoma native American tribes. Eh, not so much.


There are indications that fracking that shiat might be the problem.
 
2014-05-06 03:12:49 PM
........and the Smart Money says just get the hell out of backwards, ignorant Oklahoma.
 
2014-05-06 03:14:08 PM
We will truly destroy the world and ourselves for one more dollar won't we?
 
2014-05-06 03:15:10 PM

cgraves67: Kuta: Oklahoma residents. Frack this shiat, I'm leaving.

Oklahoma native American tribes. Eh, not so much.

There are indications that fracking that shiat might be the problem.


Yeah, but it's like anal lube, decreasing friction prevents ripping you a new asshole (or chasm across the yard), all while enjoying the ride.

I heard it on the TeeVee, so I'm sure it's legit.
 
2014-05-06 03:16:42 PM

cgraves67: Kuta: Oklahoma residents. Frack this shiat, I'm leaving.

Oklahoma native American tribes. Eh, not so much.


There are indications that fracking that shiat might be the problem.

That's kind of the point of this updated joint USGS/OGS position statement.  In mid-Feb, OGS said "The OGS has not ruled out that some earthquakes may have a relationship to oil and gas activities".

This updated statement is a little less shy: "USGS statistically analyzed the recent earthquake rate changes and found that they do not seem to be due to typical, random fluctuations in natural seismicity rates [...] The analysis suggests that a likely contributing factor to the increase in earthquakes is triggering by wastewater injected into deep geologic formations. "
 
2014-05-06 03:19:20 PM

SansNeural: cgraves67: Kuta: Oklahoma residents. Frack this shiat, I'm leaving.

Oklahoma native American tribes. Eh, not so much.

There are indications that fracking that shiat might be the problem.

That's kind of the point of this updated joint USGS/OGS position statement.  In mid-Feb, OGS said "The OGS has not ruled out that some earthquakes may have a relationship to oil and gas activities".

This updated statement is a little less shy: "USGS statistically analyzed the recent earthquake rate changes and found that they do not seem to be due to typical, random fluctuations in natural seismicity rates [...] The analysis suggests that a likely contributing factor to the increase in earthquakes is triggering by wastewater injected into deep geologic formations. "


And no one with any power to change it will give a shiat until a giant chasm opens up and swallows no less than 100 men and millions of dollars worth of equipment.
 
2014-05-06 03:21:22 PM

wildcardjack: StRalphTheLiar: Odd Bird: WelldeadLink: The Stealth Hippopotamus: We don't have basements

Of course not, what with all the earthquakes.

/I know the basement-dissuading geology of Oklahoma
//subby knows too
///subby

What is the nature of this dissuading geology?
(genuinely curious)

Short answer: clay in the soil and a high water table

I know the Geology might be different in the southern Arbuckles, but I see a good number of buried storm shelters. Of course, I only see them driving the back country bewteen casinos.


You can build a basement, just costs a truck load more.  Buried shelters are different, you can pump them out before tornado season and they stay relatively dry.

The other problem with the clay soil here is if it drys out  and then rains you get a lot of heaving of the ground.  Foundation jacking businesses are always busy around here.

/Thought I left the earth quakes behind in CA.
 
2014-05-06 03:30:41 PM
xtalman:
You can build a basement, just costs a truck load more.  Buried shelters are different, you can pump them out before tornado season and they stay relatively dry.

The other problem with the clay soil here is if it drys out  and then rains you get a lot of heaving of the ground.  Foundation jacking businesses are always busy around here.

/Thought I left the earth quakes behind in CA.


Exactly. It is possible, but is not worth the added cost to dig through the clay and build a suitable foundation, and deal with pumping and foundation repairs for years.

With detached storm shelters, there are probably more lenient building codes and some seepage is acceptable.
 
2014-05-06 03:31:30 PM

xtalman: wildcardjack: StRalphTheLiar: Odd Bird: WelldeadLink: The Stealth Hippopotamus: We don't have basements

Of course not, what with all the earthquakes.

/I know the basement-dissuading geology of Oklahoma
//subby knows too
///subby

What is the nature of this dissuading geology?
(genuinely curious)

Short answer: clay in the soil and a high water table

I know the Geology might be different in the southern Arbuckles, but I see a good number of buried storm shelters. Of course, I only see them driving the back country bewteen casinos.

You can build a basement, just costs a truck load more.  Buried shelters are different, you can pump them out before tornado season and they stay relatively dry.

The other problem with the clay soil here is if it drys out  and then rains you get a lot of heaving of the ground.  Foundation jacking businesses are always busy around here.

/Thought I left the earth quakes behind in CA.


Why dig a storm shelter? Just build one on ground level then build a dirt pile all over and around it like a burial cairn. It will stay dry enough that way.
 
2014-05-06 03:34:22 PM

cgraves67: Why dig a storm shelter? Just build one on ground level then build a dirt pile all over and around it like a burial cairn. It will stay dry enough that way.


I see a lot of structures (not always clear what they are) that look half-and-half.
 
2014-05-06 03:41:46 PM

flondrix: cgraves67: Why dig a storm shelter? Just build one on ground level then build a dirt pile all over and around it like a burial cairn. It will stay dry enough that way.

I see a lot of structures (not always clear what they are) that look half-and-half.


My "slope front" shelter is a pre-cast concrete structure that was delivered in two pieces, top and bottom.  The bottom portion was nearly buried, then the mating faces were liberally coated with a rubbery adhesive and the top piece lowered down to make a whole unit.  Lastly, dirt excavated was piled up around the top, but you don't have to do that.
 
2014-05-06 04:55:00 PM

WelldeadLink: The Stealth Hippopotamus: We don't have basements

Of course not, what with all the earthquakes.

/I know the basement-dissuading geology of Oklahoma
//subby knows too
///subby


We also have basement-dissuading geology around here, but not even close to Oklahomas type.

No earthquakes or tornadoes here though. Worst we can expect is MAYBE a bit of flash-flooding if the rainy season is particularly good.
 
2014-05-06 05:39:49 PM

SansNeural: In 2004, the Oklahoma Geological Survey measured 66 Earthquakes.

Ten years later, only into the 5th month of the year, they've measured 1843 quakes.

Source


The job-creators in action....
 
2014-05-06 07:05:50 PM
Assuming Fracking is causing the earthquakes, which is a fairly safe assumption at this point, the question is really about the magnitude of quakes that the activity can produce.  A majority of these earthquakes are in the 3.0 magnitude or less which may be disturbing, but usually isn't damaging.  The real problem may be that these smaller quakes are artificially increasing strain on other faults to trigger damaging events in the 4-5 range.  You inflate the small quakes which may be acceptable, but this enhances the risk of large events which may be unacceptable.  Of course the science connecting small quakes to larger quakes is poorly understood as is the ability to determine what events are relieving strain or enhancing strain on nearby faults.  The fact that man can cause earthquakes isn't new, geothermal energy and reservoirs have often been contributing factors to earthquakes.   Geothermal energy and these waste disposal wells would seemingly be related considering the depth of the water injection.
 
2014-05-06 07:14:55 PM

The Stealth Hippopotamus: We don't have basements


I thought people were kidding when they first told me that.
 
2014-05-06 07:45:38 PM
Last year, some dimbulb in OKC TV told people to try to outdrive the huge tornado bearing down
on the city.  It caused a huge traffic jam on I-40, and - surprise! - the tornado simply killed more
people.  Is this same doofus going to tell people to outrun an earthquake?  (Considering it's
Oklahoma...he might.)
 
Al!
2014-05-06 08:33:39 PM
As someone who watches the USGS earthquake map with more than a passing curiosity, I've been waiting for something like this.  It used to be rare to see a yellow dot in the middle of the US, but since December or so they've been growing in frequency, to the point where now there are always a series of dots in Oklahoma.
 
2014-05-06 09:24:20 PM

Al!: As someone who watches the USGS earthquake map with more than a passing curiosity, I've been waiting for something like this.  It used to be rare to see a yellow dot in the middle of the US, but since December or so they've been growing in frequency, to the point where now there are always a series of dots in Oklahoma.


Then you might be interested in this thread from a few weeks ago.  Check SVenus's posts, especially.
 
2014-05-06 10:45:56 PM

cgraves67: xtalman: wildcardjack: StRalphTheLiar: Odd Bird: WelldeadLink: The Stealth Hippopotamus: We don't have basements

Of course not, what with all the earthquakes.

/I know the basement-dissuading geology of Oklahoma
//subby knows too
///subby

What is the nature of this dissuading geology?
(genuinely curious)

Short answer: clay in the soil and a high water table

I know the Geology might be different in the southern Arbuckles, but I see a good number of buried storm shelters. Of course, I only see them driving the back country bewteen casinos.

You can build a basement, just costs a truck load more.  Buried shelters are different, you can pump them out before tornado season and they stay relatively dry.

The other problem with the clay soil here is if it drys out  and then rains you get a lot of heaving of the ground.  Foundation jacking businesses are always busy around here.

/Thought I left the earth quakes behind in CA.

Why dig a storm shelter? Just build one on ground level then build a dirt pile all over and around it like a burial cairn. It will stay dry enough that way.


in my line of work I go to many houses.

I see a few basements in the old parts of towns in northeastern Tulsa region.  In the new homes they have steel 4x6-ish rooms bolted to the concrete in the garage.   I've seen all different kinds. Sometimes cut into the garage floor.   Outside half buried ones.  All kinda of different types.

Recently saw a 12 x 23 foot concrete back patio on a house with a crawl space and under the back patio it was basically a half buried basement with only outside entrance

My father in laws house in Sapulpa has a similar "basement" about 8 x 10 with an outside entrance under his kitchen.   Just normal house built in the 50's.
 
2014-05-07 12:26:31 AM
I think it's fairly obvious at this point that God hates Oklahomans.
 
2014-05-07 03:28:13 AM

SpdrJay: I think it's fairly obvious at this point that God hates Oklahomans.


Only for how we treat gay people.

/would kill for a basement
//well...I'd kill, say, a squirrel, for a basement. 'cause I like basements and squirrels suck.
 
2014-05-07 12:22:56 PM
What about Typhoon?

whatistheexcel.com
 
Displayed 41 of 41 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report