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(Betabeat)   The police would like you to know that it's not OK to use Fund My iPhone to hunt down and beat strangers   (betabeat.com) divider line 67
    More: PSA, iPhone  
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3191 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 May 2014 at 10:11 AM (21 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-05-06 09:04:54 AM
Anyone who needs funding for their iPhone shouldn't be using it to hunt down strangers to beat up. Go get a job.
 
2014-05-06 09:53:58 AM
Fund my iPhone? Is that a kickstarter thing?
 
2014-05-06 10:12:36 AM
Can someone fund my iPhone bill?
 
2014-05-06 10:14:34 AM
Your iPhone should apply for scholarships and grants if it needs funding, not beating people. I don't see how that's even helpful.
 
2014-05-06 10:16:06 AM
"Let police officers take care of it," Cmdr. Andrew Smith of the LAPD told the Times.

Because cops are totally stoked about investigating a stolen phone.

www.quickmeme.com
 
2014-05-06 10:16:13 AM
So I'm guessing that someone was using this service to track down lazy deadbeats who wanted other people to buy their iPhones for them and then beating those people to teach them the value of hard work.
 
2014-05-06 10:16:13 AM
Having an Apple device of any sort stolen is an upgrade.

/junk
 
2014-05-06 10:16:19 AM
This headline was typed on an iPhone
 
2014-05-06 10:16:36 AM
Especially when there's plenty of people you know that deserve a good beating.
 
2014-05-06 10:16:46 AM
The problem with "call the cops and let them do their job" is that the cops don't give a shiat.  They are more likely to ignore it because if they ignore it, that keeps the crime rate down.  (If they do anything, they have to list the crime.  If they ignore it, they don't.)
 
2014-05-06 10:18:35 AM
So the advice is let the police handle it, except if you report a stolen phone, even a very expensive one the police will do exactly nothing about it even if you can show them the GPS coordinates. Finding your phone doesn't make the department any money, not like busting speeders going 40 in a 35 or even better drugs, which are the real money makers.
 
2014-05-06 10:19:15 AM
has anyone ever had the police do anything but take a report when someone is the victim of petty theft? Like believing in Santa the illusion that the police do anything kinda fades as you grow out of childhood. I can totally see why people deal with getting their phones back on their own.
 
2014-05-06 10:19:17 AM
I understand the desire for the police to prevent vigilante justice. I also understand the frustration at the level of priority these cases are given.

I had my CTA card and kindle fire stolen a few weeks ago. I promptly reported it to police and they said they'd mail me a police report inside of a week. It's been about 3, and I followed up with them information about the thief, a pending request for surveillance footage from the CTA station where my card was used. They said responded something to the extent of "We filled out a report. Use it for insurance. The case is pretty much closed."

I have to say it was kind of frustrating.
 
2014-05-06 10:19:36 AM
Just tell the cops you know where it is, and if they aren't there soon, you and friends are knocking the door down, sound excited about it, and all of a sudden they're rushing there as fast as possible to avoid bloodshed.
 
2014-05-06 10:21:12 AM

redmid17: I understand the desire for the police to prevent vigilante justice. I also understand the frustration at the level of priority these cases are given.

I had my CTA card and kindle fire stolen a few weeks ago. I promptly reported it to police and they said they'd mail me a police report inside of a week. It's been about 3, and I followed up with them information about the thief, a pending request for surveillance footage from the CTA station where my card was used. They said responded something to the extent of "We filled out a report. Use it for insurance. The case is pretty much closed."

I have to say it was kind of frustrating.


This is pretty much exactly the same thing that happens when your house gets robbed. It is EXTREMELY frustrating.
 
2014-05-06 10:26:59 AM

byteme4321: Just tell the cops you know where it is, and if they aren't there soon, you and friends are knocking the door down, sound excited about it, and all of a sudden they're rushing there as fast as possible to avoid bloodshed.


Considering I just saw an article on Yahoo saying that the cops, in that instance, told the victim to just go knock on their door and call 911 if they got into any problems...

The latest change to "Find my iPhone" makes it so that you have to put your iTunes info and password into the phone before you can even erase the phone, so that was a smart change...
 
2014-05-06 10:33:38 AM

scottydoesntknow: Anyone who needs funding for their iPhone shouldn't be using it to hunt down strangers to beat up. Go get a job.



I would, however, fund someone's iPhone if they would beat up stranglers.
 
2014-05-06 10:34:30 AM
This thread was more fun when everyone was making fun of Subby. Then everyone got all "Aaaargh! Cops are a joke!"

/this is why we can't have nice things
 
2014-05-06 10:36:17 AM

Snarfangel: I would, however, fund someone's iPhone if they would beat up stranglers.


Yep. Me, too - and I'm poor.
 
2014-05-06 10:38:36 AM

untaken_name: redmid17: I understand the desire for the police to prevent vigilante justice. I also understand the frustration at the level of priority these cases are given.

I had my CTA card and kindle fire stolen a few weeks ago. I promptly reported it to police and they said they'd mail me a police report inside of a week. It's been about 3, and I followed up with them information about the thief, a pending request for surveillance footage from the CTA station where my card was used. They said responded something to the extent of "We filled out a report. Use it for insurance. The case is pretty much closed."

I have to say it was kind of frustrating.

This is pretty much exactly the same thing that happens when your house gets robbed. It is EXTREMELY frustrating.


When I was stationed at Fort Campbell, my Jeep was stolen from in front of a convenience store in Clarksville because I left it running outside the door.  Dudes just sauntered up and drove off in it in the time it took for me to buy a case of beer and a pack of smokes.  I called the police expecting a COPS like response but they told me they would have an officer out soon to take a report.  I waited 30 minutes and nothing.  I popped open a beer and called 911 back again and told them that my Glock 27 was in the center console, and 5 minutes later an officer arrived.  He lazily filled out a report and then threatened to arrest me for public intox since he saw that the case had been opened and apparently I should wait to get home to open it.  Then he told me that I'd probably never see my Jeep again, even though it had a Lojack on it, as they didn't have Lojack trackers.  He told me to go home, and then refused to give me a ride since I had been drinking.

Lucky for me, a state trooper detected my Jeep's Lojack signal from the highway and found it in a nearby neighborhood.  The thieves got unsupervised probation and had to pay restitution for my stolen Kevlar helmet, but that's it.

/Fark the police.
 
2014-05-06 10:39:25 AM

JuggleGeek: The problem with "call the cops and let them do their job" is that the cops don't give a shiat.  They are more likely to ignore it because if they ignore it, that keeps the crime rate down.  (If they do anything, they have to list the crime.  If they ignore it, they don't.)



"The person who stole my iPhone smelled like pot. Oh, and he had a nice vehicle that I think was purchased with drug money."
 
2014-05-06 10:39:28 AM
Tell the cops the thief has been using your phone to record traffic stops. They'll catch the guy, but probably destroy your phone in the process.

Win some, lose some.
 
Ant
2014-05-06 10:45:51 AM

Headso: has anyone ever had the police do anything but take a report when someone is the victim of petty theft? Like believing in Santa the illusion that the police do anything kinda fades as you grow out of childhood. I can totally see why people deal with getting their phones back on their own.


When my car was broken into, the police didn't even call me back after I filed a report online. Some farkers stole a GPS and, for some reason, the owner's manual for my car.
 
2014-05-06 10:47:47 AM
Family member had his iphone stolen in a mugging, told police where it was, they informed him they don't go in to "that part of town"... lovely
 
2014-05-06 10:48:12 AM

CJHardin: untaken_name: redmid17: I understand the desire for the police to prevent vigilante justice. I also understand the frustration at the level of priority these cases are given.

I had my CTA card and kindle fire stolen a few weeks ago. I promptly reported it to police and they said they'd mail me a police report inside of a week. It's been about 3, and I followed up with them information about the thief, a pending request for surveillance footage from the CTA station where my card was used. They said responded something to the extent of "We filled out a report. Use it for insurance. The case is pretty much closed."

I have to say it was kind of frustrating.

This is pretty much exactly the same thing that happens when your house gets robbed. It is EXTREMELY frustrating.

When I was stationed at Fort Campbell, my Jeep was stolen from in front of a convenience store in Clarksville because I left it running outside the door.  Dudes just sauntered up and drove off in it in the time it took for me to buy a case of beer and a pack of smokes.  I called the police expecting a COPS like response but they told me they would have an officer out soon to take a report.  I waited 30 minutes and nothing.   I popped open a beer and called 911 back again and told them that my Glock 27 was in the center console, and 5 minutes later an officer arrived.  He lazily filled out a report and then threatened to arrest me for public intox since he saw that the case had been opened and apparently I should wait to get home to open it.  Then he told me that I'd probably never see my Jeep again, even though it had a Lojack on it, as they didn't have Lojack trackers.  He told me to go home, and then refused to give me a ride since I had been drinking.

Lucky for me, a state trooper detected my Jeep's Lojack signal from the highway and found it in a nearby neighborhood.  The thieves got unsupervised probation and had to pay restitution for my stolen Kevlar helmet, but that's it.

/Fark the police.


Soooooo just to be clear....
   You left your vehicle running, wide open to anyone to take for a joy ride while you entered a store to buy beer... decided to open a can of beer in PUBLIC, because, hell, this seemed like a great time to have a beer!  Then, you get upset at the current call volume of other people doing stupid things that have officers tied up, so as to not be able to "rush right over lights and sirens" to save you from your own stupidity?!?

/Riiiight.......
 
2014-05-06 10:49:39 AM

Ant: Headso: has anyone ever had the police do anything but take a report when someone is the victim of petty theft? Like believing in Santa the illusion that the police do anything kinda fades as you grow out of childhood. I can totally see why people deal with getting their phones back on their own.

When my car was broken into, the police didn't even call me back after I filed a report online. Some farkers stole a GPS and, for some reason, the owner's manual for my car.


About 10-11 years ago, I might have murdered someone for the manual to my car. I was trying to replace the light socket on it, and there was some weird latch I couldn't figure out how to work, even with the interwebs. I think I ended up driving to Autozone to get (another) light socket and asked the one of the employees if they knew how to do it.

/they did
//after checking for a manual
 
Ant
2014-05-06 10:53:54 AM

redmid17: Ant: Headso: has anyone ever had the police do anything but take a report when someone is the victim of petty theft? Like believing in Santa the illusion that the police do anything kinda fades as you grow out of childhood. I can totally see why people deal with getting their phones back on their own.

When my car was broken into, the police didn't even call me back after I filed a report online. Some farkers stole a GPS and, for some reason, the owner's manual for my car.

About 10-11 years ago, I might have murdered someone for the manual to my car. I was trying to replace the light socket on it, and there was some weird latch I couldn't figure out how to work, even with the interwebs. I think I ended up driving to Autozone to get (another) light socket and asked the one of the employees if they knew how to do it.

/they did
//after checking for a manual


Strangely, the things that pissed me off most about having my car broken into were 1) the broken window, and 2) my owner's manual. I didn't really give a shiat about the GPS, but the owner's manual was in a really nice leather case.
 
2014-05-06 10:58:27 AM
There's no way I would call the cops for this. Oh hell no. This is a DIY project if I ever saw one.
 
2014-05-06 11:00:02 AM

Snarfangel: scottydoesntknow: Anyone who needs funding for their iPhone shouldn't be using it to hunt down strangers to beat up. Go get a job.


I would, however, fund someone's iPhone if they would beat up stranglers.


Why would you pay someone to do that?

www.tourdates.co.uk

They work so hard too.
 
2014-05-06 11:00:33 AM

MassAsster: CJHardin: untaken_name: redmid17: I understand the desire for the police to prevent vigilante justice. I also understand the frustration at the level of priority these cases are given.

I had my CTA card and kindle fire stolen a few weeks ago. I promptly reported it to police and they said they'd mail me a police report inside of a week. It's been about 3, and I followed up with them information about the thief, a pending request for surveillance footage from the CTA station where my card was used. They said responded something to the extent of "We filled out a report. Use it for insurance. The case is pretty much closed."

I have to say it was kind of frustrating.

This is pretty much exactly the same thing that happens when your house gets robbed. It is EXTREMELY frustrating.

When I was stationed at Fort Campbell, my Jeep was stolen from in front of a convenience store in Clarksville because I left it running outside the door.  Dudes just sauntered up and drove off in it in the time it took for me to buy a case of beer and a pack of smokes.  I called the police expecting a COPS like response but they told me they would have an officer out soon to take a report.  I waited 30 minutes and nothing.   I popped open a beer and called 911 back again and told them that my Glock 27 was in the center console, and 5 minutes later an officer arrived.  He lazily filled out a report and then threatened to arrest me for public intox since he saw that the case had been opened and apparently I should wait to get home to open it.  Then he told me that I'd probably never see my Jeep again, even though it had a Lojack on it, as they didn't have Lojack trackers.  He told me to go home, and then refused to give me a ride since I had been drinking.

Lucky for me, a state trooper detected my Jeep's Lojack signal from the highway and found it in a nearby neighborhood.  The thieves got unsupervised probation and had to pay restitution for my stolen Kevlar helmet, but that's it.

/Fark the ...


In retrospect leaving it running wasn't the best idea.  The reason I did so is that it was January and farking cold and I thought that leaving it directly in front of the store while I was inside for 2 minutes would be safe..  After sitting around for half an hour waiting on nothing and realizing that my vehicle was probably gone forever, yep, it was time to drink a beer.

I'm guessing that you've never left your car running and popped into a store.
 
2014-05-06 11:09:22 AM
Fund? Nice typing, submitter.
 
2014-05-06 11:10:06 AM

CJHardin: In retrospect leaving it running wasn't the best idea.  The reason I did so is that it was January and farking cold and I thought that leaving it directly in front of the store while I was inside for 2 minutes would be safe..  After sitting around for half an hour waiting on nothing and realizing that my vehicle was probably gone forever, yep, it was time to drink a beer.

I'm guessing that you've never left your car running and popped into a store.


I'm not sure I know anyone who has. I've left my car running with someone sitting in it. I think I've left it running in the driveway to run back inside and get something. I've definitely never left it in front of a store or gas station.
 
2014-05-06 11:10:36 AM
The police refuse to investigate petty crimes and then have the audacity to act upset when people retake stolen property back. Well, people are going to want their stuff back; that's just human nature. We are a possessive species. It's as if you tumped a gallon of water on a hill and complained that it actually flowed downhill. This is a directly causal relationship. The only way to prevent this behavior is to establish a police force to deal with crimes as they occur, making it easier to establish justice than doing all the work yourself. If the police force gets taken away, society starts to revert to Town Posse/The Godfather/ Mongol Hordes/ or any other scrabbled-together volunteer justice system in the absence of actual peace forces.
 
2014-05-06 11:16:31 AM

redmid17: CJHardin: In retrospect leaving it running wasn't the best idea.  The reason I did so is that it was January and farking cold and I thought that leaving it directly in front of the store while I was inside for 2 minutes would be safe..  After sitting around for half an hour waiting on nothing and realizing that my vehicle was probably gone forever, yep, it was time to drink a beer.

I'm guessing that you've never left your car running and popped into a store.

I'm not sure I know anyone who has. I've left my car running with someone sitting in it. I think I've left it running in the driveway to run back inside and get something. I've definitely never left it in front of a store or gas station.


I live in a fairly rural area and it's very common around here, I rarely even take  keys out of the vehicles we own  when they are in my driveway
 
2014-05-06 11:16:31 AM

redmid17: CJHardin: In retrospect leaving it running wasn't the best idea.  The reason I did so is that it was January and farking cold and I thought that leaving it directly in front of the store while I was inside for 2 minutes would be safe..  After sitting around for half an hour waiting on nothing and realizing that my vehicle was probably gone forever, yep, it was time to drink a beer.

I'm guessing that you've never left your car running and popped into a store.

I'm not sure I know anyone who has. I've left my car running with someone sitting in it. I think I've left it running in the driveway to run back inside and get something. I've definitely never left it in front of a store or gas station.


Meh, I just chalk it up to youthful ignorance and having too much faith in humanity.  I know that I've seen vehicles running outside of convenience stores and the owners were inside.  It's just never crossed my mind that I should steal them.
 
2014-05-06 11:16:41 AM

CJHardin: untaken_name: redmid17: I understand the desire for the police to prevent vigilante justice. I also understand the frustration at the level of priority these cases are given.

I had my CTA card and kindle fire stolen a few weeks ago. I promptly reported it to police and they said they'd mail me a police report inside of a week. It's been about 3, and I followed up with them information about the thief, a pending request for surveillance footage from the CTA station where my card was used. They said responded something to the extent of "We filled out a report. Use it for insurance. The case is pretty much closed."

I have to say it was kind of frustrating.

This is pretty much exactly the same thing that happens when your house gets robbed. It is EXTREMELY frustrating.

When I was stationed at Fort Campbell, my Jeep was stolen from in front of a convenience store in Clarksville because I left it running outside the door.  Dudes just sauntered up and drove off in it in the time it took for me to buy a case of beer and a pack of smokes.  I called the police expecting a COPS like response but they told me they would have an officer out soon to take a report.  I waited 30 minutes and nothing.  I popped open a beer and called 911 back again and told them that my Glock 27 was in the center console, and 5 minutes later an officer arrived.  He lazily filled out a report and then threatened to arrest me for public intox since he saw that the case had been opened and apparently I should wait to get home to open it.  Then he told me that I'd probably never see my Jeep again, even though it had a Lojack on it, as they didn't have Lojack trackers.  He told me to go home, and then refused to give me a ride since I had been drinking.

Lucky for me, a state trooper detected my Jeep's Lojack signal from the highway and found it in a nearby neighborhood.  The thieves got unsupervised probation and had to pay restitution for my stolen Kevlar helmet, but that's it.

/Fark the police.


Please explain. Why do people leave their car running in front of stores? It boggles my mind every time I see it.

Is it really that much effort to twist the key and remove it from the ignition?

The cop was probably just annoyed you wasted his time with such a stupid crime.
 
2014-05-06 11:16:54 AM
CJHardin:
I'm guessing that you've never left your car running and popped into a store.

Not going to slam you as hard as he is, I'm curious, what state did you grow up in?

I'm from South Florida, and yeah, leaving it running unattended is an huge no-no, in addition, locking the doors while driving is just something I've always done. By contrast, my wife is always confused by that action, and annoyed when she goes to open her door and it's locked.
I've never been carjacked, or even had anyone try to open my doors while in traffic, so it's not a response to something bad, just something we do here /shrug
 
2014-05-06 11:20:20 AM

piercedgeek: CJHardin:
I'm guessing that you've never left your car running and popped into a store.

Not going to slam you as hard as he is, I'm curious, what state did you grow up in?

I'm from South Florida, and yeah, leaving it running unattended is an huge no-no, in addition, locking the doors while driving is just something I've always done. By contrast, my wife is always confused by that action, and annoyed when she goes to open her door and it's locked.
I've never been carjacked, or even had anyone try to open my doors while in traffic, so it's not a response to something bad, just something we do here /shrug


I grew up in western NC, and lived in mostly small towns.  Never knew anyone who had their car stolen.  I didn't normally leave my car unsecured and running, but it was very cold and the car hadn't warmed up yet because the store was so close to my house.  I definitely kick myself for that mistake.
 
2014-05-06 11:22:36 AM

CJHardin: The reason I did so is that it was January and farking cold and I thought that leaving it directly in front of the store while I was inside for 2 minutes would be safe.


yeah, unfortunately some people take every advantage they can get to screw other people over, and 2minutes or less was all they needed. I'm not faulting you for making a mistake, we all make mistakes.. I'm faulting you for taking the "fark the police" route after it. Sure, it took them awhile to arrive, the Officer seemed "lazy" about taking your report, but there are two sides to every coin. Low-jack trackers are given to departments by Low-jack themselves, usually they give out two.. maybe three. There's no grantee those cars equipped with those units are on the road (if take home cars, even in the city/county at the moment).  In larger cities/counties the calls per Officer can be really high, leaving your low priority call (non-life threatening/Suspect already left the scene) to be "held" for several minutes. The realities of Law Enforcement and the public perception of Law Enforcement are two very different things.. the perception gap is huge. Not every single Officer is a lazy coffee drinking slug, but those that are taint the brand for the good Officers. There are many times Officers respond to non-priority calls back to back to back for several hours at a time, and when things slow down, have a mountain of paperwork left behind. Police don't have the luxury of "meal breaks", or "15 minute breaks" - they take them as they come.  Maybe what you perceived as "lazy report taking" was in his mind, the 20th report for the night that he knew was going to screw him out of a meal for that day?

Just saying, rather than jump the gun of your immediate reaction of "holy hell things are not going my way" , you take a moment to think about what else outside of your life might be going on.

/or maybe he was a lazy a-hole.. who knows.
 
2014-05-06 11:24:26 AM

MassAsster: You left your vehicle running, wide open to anyone to take for a joy ride while you entered a store to buy beer...


So if I leave my front door open because I'm unloading groceries, I'm inviting in squatters? If I leave my lawn furniture on my lawn, it's up for grabs because it's outside and unsecured?

I know it's stupid to leave your car running. And IANAL, but stealing that car is still theft if you ask me.
 
2014-05-06 11:24:42 AM

EbolaNYC: Please explain. Why do people leave their car running in front of stores? It boggles my mind every time I see it.

Is it really that much effort to twist the key and remove it from the ignition?

The cop was probably just annoyed you wasted his time with such a stupid crime.


I was just hoping that I wouldn't have to shiver on the drive back home as it was 20 something degrees and the car hadn't warmed up yet.  It wasn't my signature move.  After that I locked it and turned on the alarm every time I got out, even for a second.

I realize that it wasn't the wisest thing to do but I didn't realize at the time that I was giving people permission to steal my Jeep because I left it running.

With that logic, all those sluts who wear revealing outfits are stupid, and responsible for the crime if they get raped.
 
2014-05-06 11:29:47 AM

MassAsster: CJHardin: The reason I did so is that it was January and farking cold and I thought that leaving it directly in front of the store while I was inside for 2 minutes would be safe.

yeah, unfortunately some people take every advantage they can get to screw other people over, and 2minutes or less was all they needed. I'm not faulting you for making a mistake, we all make mistakes.. I'm faulting you for taking the "fark the police" route after it. Sure, it took them awhile to arrive, the Officer seemed "lazy" about taking your report, but there are two sides to every coin. Low-jack trackers are given to departments by Low-jack themselves, usually they give out two.. maybe three. There's no grantee those cars equipped with those units are on the road (if take home cars, even in the city/county at the moment).  In larger cities/counties the calls per Officer can be really high, leaving your low priority call (non-life threatening/Suspect already left the scene) to be "held" for several minutes. The realities of Law Enforcement and the public perception of Law Enforcement are two very different things.. the perception gap is huge. Not every single Officer is a lazy coffee drinking slug, but those that are taint the brand for the good Officers. There are many times Officers respond to non-priority calls back to back to back for several hours at a time, and when things slow down, have a mountain of paperwork left behind. Police don't have the luxury of "meal breaks", or "15 minute breaks" - they take them as they come.  Maybe what you perceived as "lazy report taking" was in his mind, the 20th report for the night that he knew was going to screw him out of a meal for that day?

Just saying, rather than jump the gun of your immediate reaction of "holy hell things are not going my way" , you take a moment to think about what else outside of your life might be going on.

/or maybe he was a lazy a-hole.. who knows.


I guess I just thought that they would have some sense of urgency.  At the time I was only thinking of how screwed I was because I wouldn't be able to afford a replacement and it would take a long time for the insurance to do anything about it, if they did anything at all considering my mistake.  It saddened me to learn the hard way that people are not to be trusted.  Until that time I tried to be an optimist about humanity.  I guess it just felt like the police were my only hope and they didn't even care.  Essentially I just felt farked all around.  I got over though.

I did get a ticket for leaving my keys in the ignition though.  The clerks of court said they had never seen one like that.  I payed it happily though, small price to pay for my vehicle and a valuable lesson.
 
2014-05-06 11:30:47 AM
I had an iphone stolen while traveling abroad. Find My iPhone gives you the ability to lock the phone remotely, and in addition add a custom message to the lock screen. I put  on it that this phone was stolen,  added a throw-away google # where I could be reached,  and  added my opinion that all thieves are diseased dicks.

Every couple of months I get a message via the google # from some guy with a thick accent upset about buying my phone from some other guy before turning it on,  and feels it would be nice of me to give him the passwords to make th e phone work again and get rid of the vulgar message. The first coupe of times I merely hung up on him. But the last time I decided to be   a good sport I had him go get a piece of paper and pen, and told him the unlock code was  E ... A ...T ... shiat ... A ... N ... D .... D ... I ... E.

I was disappointed when I asked him to read it back to make sure he got it,that he hung up on me.

I hope he calls again.
 
2014-05-06 11:36:18 AM

MassAsster: CJHardin: The reason I did so is that it was January and farking cold and I thought that leaving it directly in front of the store while I was inside for 2 minutes would be safe.

yeah, unfortunately some people take every advantage they can get to screw other people over, and 2minutes or less was all they needed. I'm not faulting you for making a mistake, we all make mistakes.. I'm faulting you for taking the "fark the police" route after it. Sure, it took them awhile to arrive, the Officer seemed "lazy" about taking your report, but there are two sides to every coin. Low-jack trackers are given to departments by Low-jack themselves, usually they give out two.. maybe three. There's no grantee those cars equipped with those units are on the road (if take home cars, even in the city/county at the moment).  In larger cities/counties the calls per Officer can be really high, leaving your low priority call (non-life threatening/Suspect already left the scene) to be "held" for several minutes. The realities of Law Enforcement and the public perception of Law Enforcement are two very different things.. the perception gap is huge. Not every single Officer is a lazy coffee drinking slug, but those that are taint the brand for the good Officers. There are many times Officers respond to non-priority calls back to back to back for several hours at a time, and when things slow down, have a mountain of paperwork left behind. Police don't have the luxury of "meal breaks", or "15 minute breaks" - they take them as they come.  Maybe what you perceived as "lazy report taking" was in his mind, the 20th report for the night that he knew was going to screw him out of a meal for that day?

Just saying, rather than jump the gun of your immediate reaction of "holy hell things are not going my way" , you take a moment to think about what else outside of your life might be going on.

/or maybe he was a lazy a-hole.. who knows.


To add to that, I like most cops.  I realize they have a hard job and that they put a lot on the line to do it.  My brother is a SC Trooper.   The fark the cops comment had a lot to do with the fact that they only seemed interested once I told them that a pistol was involved while I was having a nervous breakdown from the loss of the most important (and nicest thing I ever had owned) possession at the time.  Also, there are a lot of substandard cops around many military bases and they seem to gain a dislike of soldiers.  I am good friends with my current town's cops, both of them (Very tiny town of Marshall, NC).
 
2014-05-06 11:42:11 AM

Prank Call of Cthulhu: "Let police officers take care of it," Cmdr. Andrew Smith of the LAPD told the Times.

Because cops are totally stoked about investigating a stolen phone.


Find My iPhone? Yeah sure. I'll uh, just check with the boys down at the Crime Lab. They uh, got uh, four more detectives working on the case. They've got us working in shifts.
 
2014-05-06 11:42:28 AM
Same thing happened to my friend. Turns out cops are just as scared of knocking on doors in Englewood as everyone else is.
 
2014-05-06 11:45:47 AM

CJHardin: I was just hoping that I wouldn't have to shiver on the drive back home as it was 20 something degrees and the car hadn't warmed up yet. It wasn't my signature move. After that I locked it and turned on the alarm every time I got out, even for a second.I realize that it wasn't the wisest thing to do but I didn't realize at the time that I was giving people permission to steal my Jeep because I left it running.With that logic, all those sluts who wear revealing outfits are stupid, and responsible for the crime if they get raped.


It's not the same as girls with short skirts because you openly invited people by leaving the car running with the doors unlocked.  Now if the girls had no underwear on and laying on the ground with the legs spread then you can compare them.

Only time I leave my car running with no one in it is at home and I usually lock the doors and use a spare key to get in.  I live in a very nice neighborhood but even I wouldn't tempt fate and teenagers.
 
2014-05-06 11:49:37 AM

TNel: It's not the same as girls with short skirts because you openly invited people by leaving the car running with the doors unlocked.  Now if the girls had no underwear on and laying on the ground with the legs spread then you can compare them.


personally, i'd still blame the rapist...
 
2014-05-06 11:52:14 AM

mama2tnt: Snarfangel: I would, however, fund someone's iPhone if they would beat up stranglers  STRANGERS.

Yep. Me, too - and I'm poor.


Oops - ftfm.
 
2014-05-06 11:52:17 AM

Veritas333: Same thing happened to my friend. Turns out cops are just as scared of knocking on doors in Englewood as everyone else is.


Yeah because who wants to get shot over a $600 device?  Submit a claim to your insurance and go about your day.
 
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