Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Major League Baseball)   110 years ago Cy Young threw the first perfect game in MLB history ... and 39 other complete games that year. You know, there probably should be an award named after him   (wapc.mlb.com ) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Major League Baseball, perfect game, Cy Young, complete game  
•       •       •

313 clicks; posted to Sports » on 06 May 2014 at 10:25 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



65 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2014-05-06 10:29:18 AM  
Only 40 complete games? That bullpen must've been taxed
 
2014-05-06 10:32:28 AM  
Awesome Baseball Throwing GuyAwardTM

/has a nice ring to it
 
2014-05-06 10:35:32 AM  
The Bean, Balk and Tar Award?

/sort of like Punt Pass and Kick used to be but with more real-word applications
 
2014-05-06 10:43:29 AM  
baseball sucks. Too long, too boring
 
2014-05-06 10:45:27 AM  
Yeah, but what was his WAR?
 
2014-05-06 10:46:01 AM  
134 years ago, Lee Richmond threw the first perfect game in MLB history... and 56 other complete games that year.
 
2014-05-06 10:48:02 AM  

Hoopy Frood: 134 years ago, Lee Richmond threw the first perfect game in MLB history... and 56 other complete games that year.


Oh, yeah. He fought under the name of Kid Minneapolis
 
2014-05-06 11:00:50 AM  

SirDigbyChickenCaesar: Hoopy Frood: 134 years ago, Lee Richmond threw the first perfect game in MLB history... and 56 other complete games that year.

Oh, yeah. He fought under the name of Kid Minneapolis


I saw Kid Minneapolis fight once. In Cincinnati.
 
2014-05-06 11:01:22 AM  

ChrisDe: SirDigbyChickenCaesar: Hoopy Frood: 134 years ago, Lee Richmond threw the first perfect game in MLB history... and 56 other complete games that year.

Oh, yeah. He fought under the name of Kid Minneapolis

I saw Kid Minneapolis fight once. In Cincinnati.


No you're thinking of Kid New York. He fought out of Philly.
 
2014-05-06 11:07:15 AM  
Why would you name an award after Cy Young? The dude had OVER 300 Losses in his career? Even Nolan Ryan couldn't attain that level of suck...
 
2014-05-06 11:15:01 AM  

ChrisDe: Yeah, but what was his WAR?


Absolutely nothin'.
 
2014-05-06 11:15:32 AM  

ChrisDe: Yeah, but what was his WAR?


135

eKonk: Why would you name an award after Cy Young? The dude had OVER 300 Losses in his career? Even Nolan Ryan couldn't attain that level of suck...


Nolan Ryan;s lifetime WAR: 106
 
2014-05-06 11:17:10 AM  

ModernPrimitive01: baseball sucks. Too long, too boring


TL:DR
 
2014-05-06 11:22:05 AM  

Hoopy Frood: 134 years ago, Lee Richmond threw the first perfect game in MLB history... and 56 other complete games that year.


Both he and John Montgomery Ward threw perfect games in 1880, five days apart (June 12 and June 17). This is the shortest spans between perfect games. They are not modern perfect games of course, but just a nice tidbit for this article.
 
2014-05-06 11:28:30 AM  

SirDigbyChickenCaesar: ChrisDe: SirDigbyChickenCaesar: Hoopy Frood: 134 years ago, Lee Richmond threw the first perfect game in MLB history... and 56 other complete games that year.

Oh, yeah. He fought under the name of Kid Minneapolis

I saw Kid Minneapolis fight once. In Cincinnati.

No you're thinking of Kid New York. He fought out of Philly.


He was killed in the ring in Houston. By Tex Colorado. You know, the Arizona Assassin.
 
2014-05-06 11:42:09 AM  

Stile4aly: SirDigbyChickenCaesar: ChrisDe: SirDigbyChickenCaesar: Hoopy Frood: 134 years ago, Lee Richmond threw the first perfect game in MLB history... and 56 other complete games that year.

Oh, yeah. He fought under the name of Kid Minneapolis

I saw Kid Minneapolis fight once. In Cincinnati.

No you're thinking of Kid New York. He fought out of Philly.

He was killed in the ring in Houston. By Tex Colorado. You know, the Arizona Assassin.


Yeah, from Dakota. I don't remember it was North or South
 
2014-05-06 11:45:01 AM  
At least he only got an award named after him!!
www.ihateals.com
 
2014-05-06 11:46:45 AM  

SirDigbyChickenCaesar: Stile4aly: SirDigbyChickenCaesar: ChrisDe: SirDigbyChickenCaesar: Hoopy Frood: 134 years ago, Lee Richmond threw the first perfect game in MLB history... and 56 other complete games that year.

Oh, yeah. He fought under the name of Kid Minneapolis

I saw Kid Minneapolis fight once. In Cincinnati.

No you're thinking of Kid New York. He fought out of Philly.

He was killed in the ring in Houston. By Tex Colorado. You know, the Arizona Assassin.

Yeah, from Dakota. I don't remember it was North or South


North. South Dakota was his brother. From West Virginia.
 
2014-05-06 12:12:45 PM  
I don't understand. According to all current baseball logic, his arm would be permanently ruined. Did he ever pitch another game???
 
2014-05-06 12:28:52 PM  

doubled99: I don't understand. According to all current baseball logic, his arm would be permanently ruined. Did he ever pitch another game???


This just in.  Things have changed a bit in 100 years.
 
2014-05-06 12:34:02 PM  
I don't understand. According to all current baseball logic, his arm would be permanently ruined. Did he ever pitch another game???

This just in.  Things have changed a bit in 100 years.

Like human physiology?
 
2014-05-06 12:35:33 PM  

doubled99: Like human physiology?


Like the amount of stress put on an arm by a modern day pitcher vs a pitcher 100 years ago.
 
2014-05-06 12:39:10 PM  
Like human physiology?

Like the amount of stress put on an arm by a modern day pitcher vs a pitcher 100 years ago.



Maybe you should stop and think about what you're saying for a minute or two.
 
2014-05-06 12:39:57 PM  

kdawg7736: Hoopy Frood: 134 years ago, Lee Richmond threw the first perfect game in MLB history... and 56 other complete games that year.

Both he and John Montgomery Ward threw perfect games in 1880, five days apart (June 12 and June 17). This is the shortest spans between perfect games. They are not modern perfect games of course, but just a nice tidbit for this article.


That record almost fell too.

May 29, 2010:

philadelphia.phillies.mlb.com

Four days later...

i.usatoday.net
 
2014-05-06 12:44:31 PM  

doubled99: Maybe you should stop and think about what you're saying for a minute or two.


Pitchers today put a lot more torque and power behind their pitches.  That's why they don't pitch 30 complete games.

Also hitters are way better so when your starter is throwing at 75% they become BP, so you need to replace him with somebody who's throwing at full power.

It's not that today's players are wimps, it's that today's pitchers would mow down the lineups back then
 
2014-05-06 12:45:30 PM  

doubled99: I don't understand. According to all current baseball logic, his arm would be permanently ruined. Did he ever pitch another game???

This just in.  Things have changed a bit in 100 years.

Like human physiology?


Well, they let non-white guys play now.
 
2014-05-06 12:45:40 PM  
I hear Shoeless Joe Jackson threw a game in 1919.
 
2014-05-06 12:46:18 PM  

doubled99: Like human physiology?

Like the amount of stress put on an arm by a modern day pitcher vs a pitcher 100 years ago.


Maybe you should stop and think about what you're saying for a minute or two.


F=mV^2 is the answer why it is different
 
2014-05-06 12:52:15 PM  

Crudbucket: Absolutely nothin'.



Nice.
 
2014-05-06 12:56:04 PM  
Pitchers today put a lot more torque and power behind their pitches. That's why they don't pitch 30 complete games.

Also hitters are way better so when your starter is throwing at 75% they become BP, so you need to replace him with somebody who's throwing at full power.

It's not that today's players are wimps, it's that today's pitchers would mow down the lineups back then



Interesting opinions.
 
2014-05-06 12:58:00 PM  

doubled99: Interesting opinions.


Ok you're right, pitchers today are just wimps who could never make it back then.  They should be out there pitching 200 a night and starting every other game.
 
2014-05-06 01:01:34 PM  

ram.1500: At least he only got an award named after him!!
[www.ihateals.com image 454x466]


It's ccoler to have a disease named after you.
 
2014-05-06 01:02:14 PM  
*cooler*
 
2014-05-06 01:06:17 PM  
Ok you're right, pitchers today are just wimps who could never make it back then.  They should be out there pitching 200 a night and starting every other game.


No, no. Don't be like that. Maybe you're right. Maybe today's pitchers have somehow found a way to put 10 times the torque and pressure on their arms, rendering them incapable of even one fourth the innings of pitchers like Young.
Must be the steroids.
 
2014-05-06 01:07:38 PM  

doubled99: Like human physiology?

Like the amount of stress put on an arm by a modern day pitcher vs a pitcher 100 years ago.


Maybe you should stop and think about what you're saying for a minute or two.


It's the pitch type and speed that have changed. Pitchers throw harder than they used to. Pitch FX has only been around since 2002, and even since then we can see a 1-3mph increase in average pitch speed depending on pitch type. More importantly, pitchers throw more sinkers and other hard breaking balls these days. Those are much harder on your joints than a standard fastball or slow curve.

The other thing is that strikeouts and walks are way way up. In Young's time, the average pitcher struck out about 2.4 batters and walked 2.7 per 9 innings. This season, the average pitcher is striking out 7.9 and walking 3.4. So a complete game back then could realistically have been not many more pitches than a 7 inning start today.
 
2014-05-06 01:12:41 PM  

jimpoz: kdawg7736: Hoopy Frood: 134 years ago, Lee Richmond threw the first perfect game in MLB history... and 56 other complete games that year.

Both he and John Montgomery Ward threw perfect games in 1880, five days apart (June 12 and June 17). This is the shortest spans between perfect games. They are not modern perfect games of course, but just a nice tidbit for this article.

That record almost fell too.

May 29, 2010:

[philadelphia.phillies.mlb.com image 275x235]

Four days later...

[i.usatoday.net image 472x240]


Armando Galarraga got so screwed that day. Oh well, life is not fair.
 
2014-05-06 01:24:58 PM  

kdawg7736: Armando Galarraga got so screwed that day. Oh well, life is not fair.


It dawned on me a few weeks ago that the two most infamous blown calls in baseball history* (the Galarraga game, and Game 6 of the 1985 World Series) involved the exact same play: ground ball to the right side of the infield, pitcher covering first, pitcher beats the runner to the bag, runner called safe.

*recent baseball history or all of baseball history, depending on your viewpoint
 
2014-05-06 01:34:41 PM  

I'm just asking questions: I hear Shoeless Joe Jackson threw a game in 1919.


Say it ain't so
 
2014-05-06 01:40:16 PM  

neon_god: In Young's time, the average pitcher struck out about 2.4 batters and walked 2.7 per 9 innings. This season, the average pitcher is striking out 7.9 and walking 3.4. So a complete game back then could realistically have been not many more pitches than a 7 inning start today.


Young once described his approach before a game:

"I never warmed up ten, fifteen minutes before a game like most pitchers do. I'd loosen up, three, four minutes. Five at the outside. And I never went to the bullpen. Oh, I'd relieve all right, plenty of times, but I went right from the bench to the box, and I'd take a few warm-up pitches and be ready. Then I had good control. I aimed to make the batter hit the ball, and I threw as few pitches as possible. That's why I was able to work every other day."

 
2014-05-06 01:44:05 PM  

neon_god: doubled99: Like human physiology?

Like the amount of stress put on an arm by a modern day pitcher vs a pitcher 100 years ago.


Maybe you should stop and think about what you're saying for a minute or two.

It's the pitch type and speed that have changed. Pitchers throw harder than they used to. Pitch FX has only been around since 2002, and even since then we can see a 1-3mph increase in average pitch speed depending on pitch type. More importantly, pitchers throw more sinkers and other hard breaking balls these days. Those are much harder on your joints than a standard fastball or slow curve.

The other thing is that strikeouts and walks are way way up. In Young's time, the average pitcher struck out about 2.4 batters and walked 2.7 per 9 innings. This season, the average pitcher is striking out 7.9 and walking 3.4. So a complete game back then could realistically have been not many more pitches than a 7 inning start today.


Walter Johnson would disagree. Bob Feller as well.
 
2014-05-06 01:44:40 PM  

MugzyBrown: Pitchers today put a lot more torque and power behind their pitches. That's why they don't pitch 30 complete games.



Walter.
Johnson.
 
2014-05-06 01:50:16 PM  
Damnit, 35 seconds.


Walter Johnson threw 531 complete games.
His pitching speed once caused Ruth to remark "That last one sounded kinda high to me.", because he couldnt track the ball.

There's a famous anecdote of his turning a batter's hat around without the batter realizing it. I can't remember the specifics of it.
 
2014-05-06 02:05:48 PM  

happydude45: neon_god: doubled99: Like human physiology?

Like the amount of stress put on an arm by a modern day pitcher vs a pitcher 100 years ago.


Maybe you should stop and think about what you're saying for a minute or two.

It's the pitch type and speed that have changed. Pitchers throw harder than they used to. Pitch FX has only been around since 2002, and even since then we can see a 1-3mph increase in average pitch speed depending on pitch type. More importantly, pitchers throw more sinkers and other hard breaking balls these days. Those are much harder on your joints than a standard fastball or slow curve.

The other thing is that strikeouts and walks are way way up. In Young's time, the average pitcher struck out about 2.4 batters and walked 2.7 per 9 innings. This season, the average pitcher is striking out 7.9 and walking 3.4. So a complete game back then could realistically have been not many more pitches than a 7 inning start today.

Walter Johnson would disagree. Bob Feller as well.


We really don't know how hard they threw, though. Feller was once clocked at 98.6, but that was a one off throw at max effort, so he probably didn't match it regularly in games. He and Johnson probably threw hard even by modern standards, but then there's a reason they're all time greats. They aren't typical of their eras (or any era)
 
2014-05-06 02:07:26 PM  
This thread is like a delicious cake made out of survivor bias, complete ignorance of how early baseball worked, and totally unverifiable anecdotes.

I love it.
 
2014-05-06 02:40:46 PM  

Victoly: neon_god: In Young's time, the average pitcher struck out about 2.4 batters and walked 2.7 per 9 innings. This season, the average pitcher is striking out 7.9 and walking 3.4. So a complete game back then could realistically have been not many more pitches than a 7 inning start today.


Young once described his approach before a game:

"I never warmed up ten, fifteen minutes before a game like most pitchers do. I'd loosen up, three, four minutes. Five at the outside. And I never went to the bullpen. Oh, I'd relieve all right, plenty of times, but I went right from the bench to the box, and I'd take a few warm-up pitches and be ready. Then I had good control. I aimed to make the batter hit the ball, and I threw as few pitches as possible. That's why I was able to work every other day."


Yeah, that's what I'm talking about. Pitching to contact and conserving energy was the prevailing strategy, and it worked in the era of dead balls, huge parks and slap hitters. The game is much different now, and pitchers target strikeouts as a result.
 
2014-05-06 03:17:28 PM  
The statistics are pretty much the same in most areas as 100 years ago, with the glaring exception of innings pitched. A good fastball was 95mph even 70 years ago, a .300 hitter was good then and now.
Isn't this why baseball is supposed to be so great, so timeless? Players of different eras can realistically be compared to each other?
Except, again, the pitcher thing.
 
2014-05-06 03:19:37 PM  

doubled99: Pitchers today put a lot more torque and power behind their pitches.  That's why they don't pitch 30 complete games.

Also hitters are way better so when your starter is throwing at 75% they become BP, so you need to replace him with somebody who's throwing at full power.

It's not that today's players are wimps, it's that today's pitchers would mow down the lineups back then


Interesting opinions.


I don't know if they had the technology back then, but Cy Young probably threw pitches in the 80-85 mph range, and Young specifically was a sidearmer, which puts less stress on the joints. Guys like Walter Johnson and Bob Feller threw 90 mph fastballs and were considered exceptional; these days 90 mph might not get you a roster spot. Also, guys like Johnson and Robin Roberts could get away with throwing just fastballs all day long and winning 30 games, whereas today pitchers are expected to have at least one breaking pitch or offspeed pitch, preferably more.

Most professional athletes back in that time also weren't devoting all their time to training, since teams didn't pay that much money for them, and they had to have second jobs. There also wasn't as much of a "feeder" system into pro sports, with formal Little League / high school / college / minor league systems. As a result the hitters that Young and Co. faced were not as strong or skilled as the professional athletes today.

Also, no black people in the league back in their day.
 
2014-05-06 03:44:59 PM  

doubled99: The statistics are pretty much the same in most areas as 100 years ago


You've said a lot of dumb things in this thread but this is the dumbest.
 
2014-05-06 03:47:12 PM  

doubled99: The statistics are pretty much the same in most areas as 100 years ago, with the glaring exception of innings pitched. A good fastball was 95mph even 70 years ago, a .300 hitter was good then and now.


From Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Johnson#Baseball_career):

Although a lack of precision instruments prevented accurate measurement of his fastball, in 1917, a Bridgeport, Connecticut munitions laboratory recorded Johnson's fastball at 134 feet per second, which is equal to 91.36 miles per hour (147.03 km/h), a velocity which was virtually unique in Johnson's day, with the possible exception of Smoky Joe Wood.

Admittedly this is a good deal more than 70 years ago, but that just goes to show how much times have changed.

Even that .300 thing has changed from era to era. In 1968, the entire league had 6 players who hit over .300, only one of them in the AL. By the mid-2000's, there are over 100. Some of that is rules (lowering the pitch mound), some of that is skill (players learning to see curveballs better), some of that is training, and of course some of that is cheating. Both sides adapt to each other.
 
2014-05-06 03:57:18 PM  

Sid Vicious' Corpse: ram.1500: At least he only got an award named after him!!
[www.ihateals.com image 454x466]

It's ccoler to have a disease named after you.


Not sure what to think.

i1.ytimg.com

/hot link
 
Displayed 50 of 65 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter








In Other Media
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report