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(TreeHugger)   It turns out the reason Japanese houses are so weird has nothing to do with tentacle porn or Hello Kitty   (treehugger.com) divider line 45
    More: Interesting, Hello Kitty, Japanese, software engineering, Freakonomics, Japanese economy  
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12026 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 May 2014 at 2:10 PM (19 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



45 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-05-06 01:25:29 PM
 
2014-05-06 01:25:32 PM
I am still waiting for the Hello Kitty Tentacle Rape porn.
 
2014-05-06 02:12:23 PM
Hello Kitty trifecta in cute play again.
 
2014-05-06 02:14:47 PM
Don't they all have a tentacle room?
 
2014-05-06 02:22:14 PM
heh...  I had no idea this was going on in japan.   Don't they have any grandfather clauses for homes?  It seems weird that someone should be forced to tear down and rebuild their home just because some words changed in a book.   Not to mention expensive as all hell...
 
2014-05-06 02:24:25 PM

Maul555:  It seems weird that someone should be forced to tear down and rebuild their home just because some words changed in a book.


Japanese Government: "That's a feature, not a bug"
 
2014-05-06 02:24:34 PM

K3rmy: I am still waiting for the Hello Kitty Tentacle Rape porn.


This is a trick to make me google this, isn't it?  Some sick bastard has to have done this already.
 
2014-05-06 02:25:56 PM

Maul555: heh...  I had no idea this was going on in japan.   Don't they have any grandfather clauses for homes?  It seems weird that someone should be forced to tear down and rebuild their home just because some words changed in a book.   Not to mention expensive as all hell...


It may be a little inconvenient, but definitely not expensive. Their houses are just made out of cray paper, paper mache and shiat.
 
2014-05-06 02:26:55 PM

BMFPitt: For a more interesting version:

http://freakonomics.com/2014/02/27/why-are-japanese-homes-disposable -a -new-freakonomics-radio-podcast-3/


THIS
 
2014-05-06 02:27:47 PM
Hello Kitty rape thread trifecta in play.
 
2014-05-06 02:28:04 PM
Weird People = Weird Houses

Hello Kitty, panty vending machines and etc...are just symptoms.
 
2014-05-06 02:37:39 PM
Honestly, it's not just the building codes thing.  It's a strong cultural aversion to anything used at all. New beats well-made if there's a choice between the two. Houses, cars, clothes, furniture, anything really.  There are a handful of resale shops (of very high-end stuff), but it's just not normally done.

The typical modern house is largely prefab components from a house-building division of one of the gigantic conglomerates.  They can knock 'em down and have a new house in place on the same spot within a week.  The family goes and stays in a hotel.
 
2014-05-06 02:39:51 PM

Lawnchair: Honestly, it's not just the building codes thing.  It's a strong cultural aversion to anything used at all. New beats well-made if there's a choice between the two. Houses, cars, clothes, furniture, anything really.  There are a handful of resale shops (of very high-end stuff), but it's just not normally done.

The typical modern house is largely prefab components from a house-building division of one of the gigantic conglomerates.  They can knock 'em down and have a new house in place on the same spot within a week.  The family goes and stays in a hotel.


Somewhat similarly, it's said that there are no hipsters in China because the Chinese don't understand why anyone would voluntarily appear poor.
 
2014-05-06 02:42:21 PM
Having spent an entire 10 days there recently, I am now an expert on Japan.  Er... no, not really.  But honestly I didn't see many "weird" houses.  The vast majority were pretty normal.  You don't see much old stuff, but that's hardly surprising given that the big cities (and many of the smaller ones) were effectively leveled by bombing during WWII.
 
2014-05-06 02:42:51 PM

Maul555: heh...  I had no idea this was going on in japan.   Don't they have any grandfather clauses for homes?  It seems weird that someone should be forced to tear down and rebuild their home just because some words changed in a book.   Not to mention expensive as all hell...


They probably do, but how much refurbishment does the government allow before triggering 'you have to upgrade the house to new standards'?  If a kitchen remodeling is enough...
 
2014-05-06 02:48:02 PM

Maul555: heh...  I had no idea this was going on in japan.   Don't they have any grandfather clauses for homes?  It seems weird that someone should be forced to tear down and rebuild their home just because some words changed in a book.   Not to mention expensive as all hell...


Conform otakusan.
 
2014-05-06 02:50:30 PM

Lawnchair: Honestly, it's not just the building codes thing.  It's a strong cultural aversion to anything used at all...*snip*



And that's odd, considering how labyrinthine their recycling/trash collection rules are. On one hand, they make it difficult to just dispose of items as you see fit (often with folks leaving usable items outside with signs saying "Free for the taking!". On the other, they really don't want you hanging on to many things for very long. Gotta buy buy buy, citizen!
 
2014-05-06 02:51:06 PM

Rapmaster2000: Lawnchair: Honestly, it's not just the building codes thing.  It's a strong cultural aversion to anything used at all. New beats well-made if there's a choice between the two. Houses, cars, clothes, furniture, anything really.  There are a handful of resale shops (of very high-end stuff), but it's just not normally done.

The typical modern house is largely prefab components from a house-building division of one of the gigantic conglomerates.  They can knock 'em down and have a new house in place on the same spot within a week.  The family goes and stays in a hotel.

Somewhat similarly, it's said that there are no hipsters in China because the Chinese don't understand why anyone would voluntarily appear poor.


*that doesn't preclude being preternaturally cheap though. But totally non ironically.
 
2014-05-06 02:55:41 PM
Do they blame Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and Fukishima?  Eating radioactive fish has to have some sort of side effect.
 
2014-05-06 03:01:05 PM
I like the car in the last pic. Is it a Citroen 2CV, or is there a similarly shaped Japanese car I didn't know about?

...Is the old classic car a statement about disposability, too?
 
2014-05-06 03:03:02 PM

Rapmaster2000: Lawnchair: Honestly, it's not just the building codes thing.  It's a strong cultural aversion to anything used at all. New beats well-made if there's a choice between the two. Houses, cars, clothes, furniture, anything really.  There are a handful of resale shops (of very high-end stuff), but it's just not normally done.

The typical modern house is largely prefab components from a house-building division of one of the gigantic conglomerates.  They can knock 'em down and have a new house in place on the same spot within a week.  The family goes and stays in a hotel.

Somewhat similarly, it's said that there are no hipsters in China because the Chinese don't understand why anyone would voluntarily appear poor.


That's also why the Marlboro Man advertisement campaign didn't work in Hong Kong. The Chinese didn't see anything admirable in a rural, working-class guy.
 
2014-05-06 03:12:33 PM

K3rmy: I am still waiting for the Hello Kitty Tentacle Rape porn.


Dont know why you're wanting a tentacled kitty to rape something, but this one is setting the stage:

fc00.deviantart.net
 
2014-05-06 03:14:13 PM

cgraves67: The Chinese didn't see anything admirable in a rural, working-class guy


Because people in power are better than you. The Chinese know their place unlike us uppity Americans.
 
2014-05-06 03:21:35 PM
Came to link to Freakanomics but I see it's been covered.
 
2014-05-06 03:22:09 PM

RoyHobbs22: Do they blame Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and Fukishima?  Eating radioactive fish has to have some sort of side effect.


Just remember - Japan received 2 atomic bombs, but there were 100 above-ground detonations at the Nevada test site.
 
2014-05-06 03:23:39 PM
It's less about tentacle porn and Hello Kitty and more about earthquake porn and hello typhoon! Although some things are easier to explain than others...

blog.hachimitsu.org
 
2014-05-06 03:29:31 PM

Rapmaster2000: Lawnchair: Honestly, it's not just the building codes thing.  It's a strong cultural aversion to anything used at all. New beats well-made if there's a choice between the two. Houses, cars, clothes, furniture, anything really.  There are a handful of resale shops (of very high-end stuff), but it's just not normally done.

The typical modern house is largely prefab components from a house-building division of one of the gigantic conglomerates.  They can knock 'em down and have a new house in place on the same spot within a week.  The family goes and stays in a hotel.

Somewhat similarly, it's said that there are no hipsters in China because the Chinese don't understand why anyone would voluntarily appear poor.


Just wait a generation though. The Chinese adopt Western mentalities surprisingly fast.
 
2014-05-06 03:34:45 PM
I thought it was becasue Godzilla kept smashing them.
 
2014-05-06 03:36:47 PM
The government also promotes obsolescence in house design by upgrading the building codes every ten years due to earthquake risk. Rather that retrofit, people rebuild.

That's good news for the Japanese economy, but less good for homeowners themselves.


static.tvtropes.org
 
2014-05-06 03:53:01 PM

Lawnchair: Honestly, it's not just the building codes thing.  It's a strong cultural aversion to anything used at all. New beats well-made if there's a choice between the two. Houses, cars, clothes, furniture, anything really.  There are a handful of resale shops (of very high-end stuff), but it's just not normally done.

The typical modern house is largely prefab components from a house-building division of one of the gigantic conglomerates.  They can knock 'em down and have a new house in place on the same spot within a week.  The family goes and stays in a hotel.


---
I concur.
In one small town (outside of Nagano) we went to a resale shop with an absolutely gorgeous & comfy loveseat that stayed 'on the shelf' for ages... just because it was 'used'.

/nope, it didn't look used at all - would've taken it home in a heartbeat if home wasn't 7,000 miles away.
 
2014-05-06 03:53:40 PM

jigger: The government also promotes obsolescence in house design by upgrading the building codes every ten years due to earthquake risk. Rather that retrofit, people rebuild.

That's good news for the Japanese economy, but less good for homeowners themselves.

[static.tvtropes.org image 405x289]


Still no solution for building-smashing night giants.
 
2014-05-06 04:12:53 PM

DigitalCoffee: It's less about tentacle porn and Hello Kitty and more about earthquake porn and hello typhoon! Although some things are easier to explain than others...

[blog.hachimitsu.org image 620x366]


What about a typhoon of Hello Tentacle Kitty porn so big it causes an earthquake?  Someone has to think of all the possible scenarios...
 
2014-05-06 04:16:29 PM

Not impressed:


www.anymanga.com

 
2014-05-06 04:17:12 PM

Osomatic: Having spent an entire 10 days there recently, I am now an expert on Japan. Er... no, not really. But honestly I didn't see many "weird" houses. The vast majority were pretty normal


The vast majority of everything in Japan is "Pretty Normal" The whole society just wants to fit in with each other.

That's why the weird things are off the wall zany. Duck, duck, duck, duck, CRAZY GOOSE, duck, duck, etc.
 
2014-05-06 05:25:18 PM

Ivo Shandor: RoyHobbs22: Do they blame Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and Fukishima?  Eating radioactive fish has to have some sort of side effect.

Just remember - Japan received 2 atomic bombs, but there were 100 above-ground detonations at the Nevada test site.


Was the head wind blowing straight to Florida?
 
2014-05-06 05:52:50 PM
i1211.photobucket.com

Attention whore, home edition!
 
2014-05-06 06:45:20 PM

Hz so good: Lawnchair: Honestly, it's not just the building codes thing.  It's a strong cultural aversion to anything used at all...*snip*


And that's odd, considering how labyrinthine their recycling/trash collection rules are. On one hand, they make it difficult to just dispose of items as you see fit (often with folks leaving usable items outside with signs saying "Free for the taking!". On the other, they really don't want you hanging on to many things for very long. Gotta buy buy buy, citizen!


When I was a kid in Japan, I got many consumer electronics and furniture from gomi piles.  Stuff I would have no business affording on my allowance.
 
2014-05-06 06:50:16 PM

Vector R: [i1211.photobucket.com image 650x433]

Attention whore, home edition!


They even have a "vintage" shiatcan Citroen.
 
2014-05-06 06:57:04 PM
Ninja please
 
2014-05-06 07:25:47 PM
I want that climbing wall! Not that one specifically, because it's aweful, but I love the idea behind it, having a climbing wall and ladders just in case I get bored of using the stairs. I'm pretty sure the stairs would just collect dust.
 
2014-05-06 07:59:49 PM
http://catforehead.wordpress.com/

A much, much better source of info by a couple living in Japan.  Their search for a home spanning some ten years and ending with them deciding to build their own to spec.

They discuss many important problems with the Japanese housing market including planned obsolescence, poor materials, ridiculous costs, double mortgagees, youth drain, trade barriers and cultural norms.

My favorite aspect is the fact that there are MILLIONS of abandoned properties in Japan that will sit there until they rot due to Catch-22 building laws.  Example: A house was built before modern earthquake and fire regulations.  Now the house is old, dilapidated and a fire hazard.  However, the owners cannot tear it down.  Why?  Because with new regulations the property is no longer zoned for a house.  They could pay for the house to be torn down (several thousands of dollars) but then it could only be an empty lot.  And empty lots are taxes at many times the rate of properties with houses on them.  So many folks just let the properties rot.  I used to wonder why I saw so many eyesore buildings over here but now I understand completely.
 
2014-05-06 08:01:57 PM

RoyHobbs22: Was the head wind blowing straight to Florida?


Surprisingly, no. On the maps I've seen the Nevada fallout missed Florida. It must be something else, like their billion tons of radioactive waste from fertilizer production.
 
2014-05-07 01:27:49 PM

nanim: Lawnchair: Honestly, it's not just the building codes thing.  It's a strong cultural aversion to anything used at all. New beats well-made if there's a choice between the two. Houses, cars, clothes, furniture, anything really.  There are a handful of resale shops (of very high-end stuff), but it's just not normally done.

The typical modern house is largely prefab components from a house-building division of one of the gigantic conglomerates.  They can knock 'em down and have a new house in place on the same spot within a week.  The family goes and stays in a hotel.

---
I concur.
In one small town (outside of Nagano) we went to a resale shop with an absolutely gorgeous & comfy loveseat that stayed 'on the shelf' for ages... just because it was 'used'.

/nope, it didn't look used at all - would've taken it home in a heartbeat if home wasn't 7,000 miles away.


A lot of fights with Ms. dj245 (who was born in Japan and lived there for 25 years, but not Japanese) originate with me either buying, or proposing to buy, something used.
 
2014-05-07 06:04:37 PM
So if real estate doesn't appreciate in Japan, who buys it?  You'd be better off renting.
 
2014-05-07 07:43:49 PM

Mouser: So if real estate doesn't appreciate in Japan, who buys it?  You'd be better off renting.


The  land appreciates.  The  house depreciates.  So when finances dictate it, the family goes and stays in a hotel for a couple weeks while they rebuild the house, made possible in that they make everything much more modular.

Other than if you treat something as disposable it tends to end up that way, I actually agree with most of the sentiment - unless you maintain and approve it a house should decrease in value, just generally below inflation, so it 'increases' in value only on paper if you don't account for inflation.  'Antique' homes would be a bit different, just like antique furniture, but on average homes should decrease in value unless you not only keep them up, but improve them - more insulation, a better kitchen, etc...
 
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