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(SeattlePI)   Actual headline, and also entire article: "Judge frees Missouri convict who wasn't sent to prison for 13 years due to clerical error"   (seattlepi.com) divider line 26
    More: Strange, Missouri  
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3212 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 May 2014 at 10:05 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



26 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-05-06 09:29:02 AM  
and he actually turned his life around.
 
2014-05-06 10:01:00 AM  
Here's a full article Link

Long story short, he was arrested as a youth for armed robbery and sentenced to 13 years, but they never told him where or when to report to prison even after he asked them.  So, he went on with his life, never got into trouble, got married, divorced, married again, had some kids, started three businesses, and basically lived a good life.  When the sentence was supposed to be up, the state realized what happened and they grabbed him.  The judge decided that since he had been a productive citizen, the state would consider the sentence served and he wouldn't have to go on parole.  Good story overall.
 
2014-05-06 10:08:35 AM  
I'm glad this turned out the way it did. When the state realized their mistake they actually went and arrested this guy in the middle of the night, and the DA fully wanted him to serve his jail term, because justice had to be served. Obviously he was about the only one who cared.
 
2014-05-06 10:10:45 AM  
I have no snark for this. This has never happened to me before!
/Good for the judge and the guy doing something with his life
 
2014-05-06 10:13:30 AM  
Just think about how much more reformed he would have been if he'd spent that time in prison instead. If he's a productive member of society now, he could have been released from jail right now as the next Steve Jobs or something. I bet he regrets the state's error in not reforming him now!
 
2014-05-06 10:15:04 AM  
That's some damn fine journalism.

/good for the guy and good for the judge, though.
 
2014-05-06 10:17:04 AM  
Grate hedline.  Jernilism is difcult.
 
2014-05-06 10:17:26 AM  
Justice was served.
 
2014-05-06 10:18:52 AM  
Good. He's clearly a rehabilitated man who has repaid his debt to society just not in the confines of some correctional facility. Lucky SOB. I'm glad he took the opportunity as a wake up call to turn his life around. The only thing I'd change would be to make it a stipulation he apologizes to those he robbed and repays them any money that he stole and call it a day
 
2014-05-06 10:19:14 AM  

Mentat: Here's a full article Link

Long story short, he was arrested as a youth for armed robbery and sentenced to 13 years, but they never told him where or when to report to prison even after he asked them.  So, he went on with his life, never got into trouble, got married, divorced, married again, had some kids, started three businesses, and basically lived a good life.  When the sentence was supposed to be up, the state realized what happened and they grabbed him.  The judge decided that since he had been a productive citizen, the state would consider the sentence served and he wouldn't have to go on parole.  Good story overall.


So lemme get this right.  He got scared straight by a 13 year sentence he didn't serve and was found to be a productive member of society?  Kinda makes you wonder how he would have turned out serving that 13?

/good for him
//stop robbing people, oh wait he did
///prison not all what it's cracked up to be
 
2014-05-06 10:20:14 AM  

SlothB77: and he actually turned his life around.


Yes. And good for the judge for having common sense.
 
2014-05-06 10:21:31 AM  

Fubini: I'm glad this turned out the way it did. When the state realized their mistake they actually went and arrested this guy in the middle of the night, and the DA fully wanted him to serve his jail term, because justice had to be served. Obviously he was about the only one who cared.


In all fairness, the AG had to do this because his client is the state and he has to do what they want.  Koster, the AG, didn't really want to do it and even gave the lawyer a couple 'outs' to make sure the guy wouldn't really have to serve the 13 years.  In fact the attorney there for the state didn't even speak at the hearing yesterday.  It was not like the guy was hiding either.  He got pulled over for speeding and there was no warrant, he applied for a work licenses and nothing popped up.
 
2014-05-06 10:22:28 AM  

Fubini: I'm glad this turned out the way it did. When the state realized their mistake they actually went and arrested this guy in the middle of the night, and the DA fully wanted him to serve his jail term, because justice had to be served. Obviously he was about the only one who cared.


Probably receives kickbacks from the for-profit prison industry.
 
2014-05-06 10:23:44 AM  

bluenote13: Fubini: I'm glad this turned out the way it did. When the state realized their mistake they actually went and arrested this guy in the middle of the night, and the DA fully wanted him to serve his jail term, because justice had to be served. Obviously he was about the only one who cared.

In all fairness, the AG had to do this because his client is the state and he has to do what they want.  Koster, the AG, didn't really want to do it and even gave the lawyer a couple 'outs' to make sure the guy wouldn't really have to serve the 13 years.  In fact the attorney there for the state didn't even speak at the hearing yesterday.  It was not like the guy was hiding either.  He got pulled over for speeding and there was no warrant, he applied for a work licenses and nothing popped up.


And I'm wrong.
 
2014-05-06 10:26:16 AM  

Elroydb: Good. He's clearly a rehabilitated man who has repaid his debt to society just not in the confines of some correctional facility. Lucky SOB. I'm glad he took the opportunity as a wake up call to turn his life around. The only thing I'd change would be to make it a stipulation he apologizes to those he robbed and repays them any money that he stole and call it a day


He apologized for sure.  I'm not sure about the money, though.  The guy he robbed actually showed up to testify that the man should be freed.

Meanwhile, people with 15-year-old speeding tickets are sentenced to a year in jail for non-payment.
 
2014-05-06 10:27:38 AM  

JackieRabbit: SlothB77: and he actually turned his life around.

Yes. And good for the judge for having common sense.


Damn activist judges
 
2014-05-06 10:30:58 AM  
You're in the wrong line, dumbass.
 
2014-05-06 10:31:07 AM  

bluenote13: In all fairness, the AG had to do this because his client is the state and he has to do what they want. Koster, the AG, didn't really want to do it and even gave the lawyer a couple 'outs' to make sure the guy wouldn't really have to serve the 13 years.


Then why didn't he find a way for the guy to not be in prison while his appeals were pending?  He stole almost a year of the guy's life.
 
2014-05-06 10:31:41 AM  
tl;dr
 
2014-05-06 10:43:25 AM  

NightSteel: bluenote13: In all fairness, the AG had to do this because his client is the state and he has to do what they want. Koster, the AG, didn't really want to do it and even gave the lawyer a couple 'outs' to make sure the guy wouldn't really have to serve the 13 years.

Then why didn't he find a way for the guy to not be in prison while his appeals were pending?  He stole almost a year of the guy's life.


That is a fair question but again, the state is his client and the fact is he doing their job.  At the time the guy should have still been in jail from the original time he was sentenced to.  I am not saying it was right he was in jail all that time, not at all, but Koster even seemed like he wanted nothing to do with pursuing this.  I am not a Koster apologist at all, I cannot stand the guy btw.  I just think he was in a bad spot here.  it is not his call to drop charges after a conviction was rendered.

As far as apologizing to the victim, I believe the victim didn't even want him to serve the time.  There was a comment in another article that the victim was willing to speak in court that there was no reason after all this time, and after the guy turned his life around, to punish him with the 13 years in prison.
 
2014-05-06 11:16:56 AM  
This story was featured on an episode of This American Life. Scroll down to Act Four for the full transcript, or listen to it here.
 
2014-05-06 11:23:07 AM  
 Hugh Mearns call your office .. level three antigonish alert ..
 
2014-05-06 01:03:23 PM  

AugieDoggyDaddy: Grate hedline.  Jernilism is difcult.


Your synopsis of the article in question provides more detail than the actual article and was more interesting.
 
2014-05-06 02:46:15 PM  
Only in the P-I
 
2014-05-06 03:00:12 PM  
Mentat: ....  Good story overall.

Except for the reminder that throwing young people away to rot even though they could relatively easily be rehabilitated is our standard operating procedure.  Had this man served a few years and paroled he would probably be serving life for his third armed robbery.
 
2014-05-06 04:19:08 PM  
I am torn on this one.  What does it say to all the people convicted of criminal charges that the state doesn't screw up the paperwork?
 
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