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(The Atlantic)   What has been seen cannot be unseen   (theatlantic.com) divider line 5
    More: Cool, visual cortex, Tom Toppino, cognitive scientists, dalmatians, Unsee, thalamus, ambiguity  
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7596 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 May 2014 at 10:17 PM (15 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Skr
2014-05-06 06:35:06 AM
1 votes:

Oreamnos: I don't understand the "ambiguous triangles" example pictured in the article.


On first glance, most people will determine that the triangles are pointing a single direction. All pointing to the right like arrows, for example. The equilateral triangles could very well be 'pointing' in two other directions. Once the brain realizes this, you'll start seeing the triangles all point in the alternate direction. It should keep cycling through the directions on a longer viewing. That is my understanding of it at least.

www.brain.riken.jp
2014-05-06 02:00:15 AM
1 votes:
The article reminds me of this:

www.majhost.com
2014-05-06 01:35:22 AM
1 votes:
www.goodlolz.com
2014-05-06 12:51:12 AM
1 votes:
fontslogo.com
2014-05-05 10:46:16 PM
1 votes:
Canada Flag: Two guys looking over scottydoesntknow's lamp.
 
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