Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Techsonia)   You can change your underwear now, the 25-foot wide asteroid has safely passed by Earth   (techsonia.com ) divider line
    More: Cool, asteroids, Earth  
•       •       •

4701 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 May 2014 at 9:50 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



57 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2014-05-05 03:25:20 PM  

maxheck: JackieRabbit:

"According to the Mail Online, if an asteroid of the same size collided with the Earth, it could destroy a small city. Its destruction would be half of the Hiroshima nuclear bomb."

No, it would not. An asteroid of this size would be largely vaporized in the upper atmosphere and any surviving fragments would be quite small. Fortunately, asteroids don't work the way OMFG! reporters want them to.

It's not the surviving fragments that hurt, it's the blast it creates braking.

Think of the energy that would be required to loft a 25' rock to escape velocity in a matter of seconds. That's how much energy the rock would dump into the atmosphere slowing down to nothing and disintegrating.

That's a big honking fireball and resultant shockwave... In the worst case where it was coming straight down over the hypothetical small city it would be like a hammer from God even if the entire rock was vaporized.

There's not much left of atomic bombs when they're done exploding either, but they don't do damage through their fragments.


Do you know what else releases approximately the same amount of energy as a Hiroshima-size bomb? A four foot wave breaking on the beach. Or try the average thunderstorm. Atomic bombs are so destructive because they release their energy in a very small space and within a few microseconds. There would not be a "honking fireball" and resultant shockwave from a 25 foot wide meteorite. I nice little light show for a minute or so and that's it. They don't break so much as just burn up and very high in the atmosphere. These things hit us all the time and we usually don't even notice.
 
2014-05-05 04:03:10 PM  

CeroX: What a 25' meteor looks like after passing through the Atmosphere:
[www.towercrystals.com image 450x334]


A 25-foot asteroid would way some 500 tons (source). Even if it lost 99% of its mass the thing would still weight some 1000 pounds at the end.
Sandstone weighs about 2.5 tons per cubic meter (source), so a 500-ton sandstone meteor* that lost 99% of its mass would end up about 1/2 cubic meter in size.

*just roll with it
 
2014-05-05 04:31:40 PM  

gnosis301: 25 feet may not seem big to some FARKers, but at the asteroid's velocity of 17 times the speed of light, even a sneeze could destroy the earth.


How fast is that in parsecs?
 
2014-05-05 04:51:47 PM  

gnosis301: 25 feet may not seem big to some FARKers, but at the asteroid's velocity of 17 times the speed of light, even a sneeze could destroy the earth.


Next time you see your mother, slap her for me.
 
2014-05-05 04:55:43 PM  
JackieRabbit:

maxheck: JackieRabbit:

"According to the Mail Online, if an asteroid of the same size collided with the Earth, it could destroy a small city. Its destruction would be half of the Hiroshima nuclear bomb."

No, it would not. An asteroid of this size would be largely vaporized in the upper atmosphere and any surviving fragments would be quite small. Fortunately, asteroids don't work the way OMFG! reporters want them to.

It's not the surviving fragments that hurt, it's the blast it creates braking.

Think of the energy that would be required to loft a 25' rock to escape velocity in a matter of seconds. That's how much energy the rock would dump into the atmosphere slowing down to nothing and disintegrating.

That's a big honking fireball and resultant shockwave... In the worst case where it was coming straight down over the hypothetical small city it would be like a hammer from God even if the entire rock was vaporized.

There's not much left of atomic bombs when they're done exploding either, but they don't do damage through their fragments.

Do you know what else releases approximately the same amount of energy as a Hiroshima-size bomb? A four foot wave breaking on the beach. Or try the average thunderstorm. Atomic bombs are so destructive because they release their energy in a very small space and within a few microseconds. There would not be a "honking fireball" and resultant shockwave from a 25 foot wide meteorite. I nice little light show for a minute or so and that's it. They don't break so much as just burn up and very high in the atmosphere. These things hit us all the time and we usually don't even notice.


What I was trying to point out was that it doesn't matter on the scale of this meteorite just how much of the bolide that hits the ground. Your post and several others seemed to focus on "oh, it'll be a tiny little chunk of rock once it reaches sea level." as if it were bullets rather than say, fuel-air bombs, and that may not be the way to look at it.

No, on that scale it matters that 500 tons (c.f. earlier posts) of matter has a farkton of kinetic energy that has to be dumped somewhere when coming in from (at least) escape velocity speeds and none of it hits the ground. That energy gets dumped into a blast. Wouldn't be a Chelyabinsk but then that came in at a reasonably shallow angle. I described a worst case, but that could still be a pretty big hammer.

I don't know the parameters of this particular rock, had it struck ideally it'd be one of our Earth Trojan followers angled and have just skipped off the atmosphere. Then again, we might get one coming in retrograde, from Jupiter or further out and come in head on.

But saying "well, it'd just be this tiny rock by the time it hit ground" doesn't really capture what happens.
To my knowledge, no one has ever found any trace of whatever hit Tunguska, but the blast damage was notable.
 
2014-05-05 05:27:56 PM  

Percise1: Next time you see your mother, slap her for me.


My mother died Christmas 2012.
 
2014-05-05 06:03:25 PM  
So it is probably not going to happen unless you buy a shovel...
 
Displayed 7 of 57 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter








In Other Media
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report