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(YouTube)   So it turns out SpaceX doesn't have the only rocket that can take off and land on its feet   (youtube.com) divider line 51
    More: Cool, SpaceX  
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3369 clicks; posted to Video » on 04 May 2014 at 5:40 PM (33 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-05-04 02:55:57 PM  
Hmm...I wonder if they could use this Lander on, say...Jupiter?

i57.tinypic.com
 
2014-05-04 02:58:03 PM  
www.weirdwarp.com
 
2014-05-04 03:14:49 PM  
Am I the only one who who isn't too impressed considering these plans are based on designs that are 50 years old.
 
2014-05-04 03:32:46 PM  
This was already done on the moon except they landed first
 
2014-05-04 04:27:52 PM  

Makh: Am I the only one who who isn't too impressed considering these plans are based on designs that are 50 years old.


Stuff like this never gets old for me.
 
2014-05-04 05:24:29 PM  
upload.wikimedia.org

/obscure?
 
2014-05-04 05:35:13 PM  

ElLoco: Stuff like this never gets old for me.


I was promised a landing on Mars and goddamn flying cars by now.
 
2014-05-04 06:06:40 PM  
Lovely.

Makh: Am I the only one who who isn't too impressed considering these plans are based on designs that are 50 years old.


I've no idea.

However, just as an observation, the basic rocketry maybe be 50 years old, but the control systems are not.
This is quite impressive. It would be more so if the control systems actually made the decisions, rather than relying on a pre-programmed sequence.
 
2014-05-04 06:39:52 PM  

Tillmaster: It would be more so if the control systems actually made the decisions, rather than relying on a pre-programmed sequence.


that is what happened. The craft "found" a good landing site on its own. That was the test.
 
2014-05-04 06:57:04 PM  

mr lawson: Tillmaster: It would be more so if the control systems actually made the decisions, rather than relying on a pre-programmed sequence.

that is what happened. The craft "found" a good landing site on its own. That was the test.


I didn't know the moon had concrete landing pads.  That's gotta make things easier.
 
2014-05-04 07:05:03 PM  
www.stylespectro.com
 
2014-05-04 07:08:24 PM  

iron de havilland: [upload.wikimedia.org image 640x480]

/obscure?


No!

Now I want to play it again.
 
2014-05-04 08:19:23 PM  
Ha!  That was an Armadillo Aerospace vehicle.  Nice to see those designs still flying.

Looked like a methane engine (blue flame) and a side scanning LIDAR?  Landing looked autonomous.

A rocket that can do a powered landing on Earth is 6x overkill for lunar gravity, and the Moon has no crosswind pushing you around on terminal descent.

Nice work.

Meanwhile, at SpaceX, a F9-R just did a 1 km test flight.

/with the Shuttle gone, space is getting fun again.
 
2014-05-04 08:30:34 PM  
We bring you now to the early days of the Morpheus test program:

Watch the entire vid
 
2014-05-04 08:50:08 PM  

Beerguy: [www.stylespectro.com image 500x800]


Damn ..wrong thread...oh well...no one is complaining.
 
2014-05-04 08:53:16 PM  

Beerguy: Beerguy: [www.stylespectro.com image 500x800]

Damn ..wrong thread...oh well...no one is complaining.


Yeah, what thread is that?
 
2014-05-04 09:00:52 PM  

Beerguy: [www.stylespectro.com image 500x800]


That's the best the governme... THE US GOVERNMENT can come up with!?!?

/you're NASA for crying out loud
 
2014-05-04 09:14:18 PM  

AttawaYawattA: That's the best the governme... THE US GOVERNMENT can come up with!?!?

/you're NASA for crying out loud


We have no contingency plan
www.wearysloth.com
 
2014-05-04 09:54:10 PM  
Yes, everything is autonomous, the controllers just hit the 'go' button.

The Free Flight 10 video was better, and shows the view from the scanning head:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sI5tsetrbpA  FF10
TFV is FF11
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tmkPJUHYdRA FF12, though the videographer edited in the witness cam upside-down.

The concrete pad is just for vehicle safety and reusability.  It is covered in the same crawler fines as the rest of the hazard field (which get blown away at landing).  Without the pad, way more dust is kicked up and we would have to keep filling in the hole created by the plume. We have a hyper-accurate truth model of the terrain to make sure we're sensing it correctly in post-flight analysis, and it would be a biatch if that truth changes after each flight.

I work on ALHAT.  Part of the ALHAT system is a subsystem to scan terrain and pick out suitable and safe landing sites (hazard detection system).  We've been on Morpheus for 3 flights so far, (Free flights 10, 11, and 12).  All 3 flights picked the landing pad as the highest safe area.  There are actually 3 safe pads in the scanning area, but only 1 has a concrete pad in it.  The other concrete pad isn't in the scanning area.

FF10 and 11 were checkout and data collection flights.  For Free Flight 12, the vehicle was allowed to land in the spot ALHAT HDS told the vehicle to land.

ALHAT also includes "No GPS" sensors and nav filter.  Laser altimeter, 3 Beam Doppler Lidar velocimeter, and the HDS pulls double duty as a hazard relative navigation sensor. (Hey, you told me the rock was here, but actually it's over there).  The plan is by the end of may to do a flight completely closed loop on the "No GPS" nav filter by the end of may.

http://morpheuslander.jsc.nasa.gov/
 
2014-05-04 09:58:05 PM  
Oh, and yes, the Morpheus vehicle is an up-sized Armadillo Aerospace Pixel vehicle with a JSC designed LOX/Methane engine and JSC designed control system.
 
2014-05-04 10:04:45 PM  

unbelver: The plan is by the end of may to do a flight completely closed loop on the "No GPS" nav filter by the end of may.


Brought to you by the department of redundancy department.
 
2014-05-04 10:36:22 PM  

unbelver: Oh, and yes, the Morpheus vehicle is an up-sized Armadillo Aerospace Pixel vehicle with a JSC designed LOX/Methane engine and JSC designed control system.


been watching all of the progress of it. You guys rock!
 
2014-05-04 10:50:25 PM  
This is the rocket engine which cause a huge grass fire at JSC  during one of the tests.
 
2014-05-04 11:14:46 PM  

mr lawson: Tillmaster: It would be more so if the control systems actually made the decisions, rather than relying on a pre-programmed sequence.

that is what happened. The craft "found" a good landing site on its own. That was the test.


FTFV:
"the landing data was pre-programmed. "
 
2014-05-04 11:20:26 PM  

fatbear: FTFV:
"the landing data was pre-programmed. "


True for Free Flight 11, which is TFV.  Look at the Free Flight 12 video, which used the ALHAT HDS picked landing site.  (links in a previous post of mine).
 
2014-05-04 11:33:40 PM  

unbelver: True for Free Flight 11, which is TFV.  Look at the Free Flight 12 video, which used the ALHAT HDS picked landing site.  (links in a previous post of mine).


guess i was a little more up to date than the article..lol.
 
2014-05-05 12:13:25 AM  
unbelver

Oh, and yes, the Morpheus vehicle is an up-sized Armadillo Aerospace Pixel vehicle with a JSC designed LOX/Methane engine and JSC designed control system.

Looks like a fun program, making good progress.

Why did you choose an Armadillo vehicle?
 
2014-05-05 12:20:58 AM  
Ask the Morpheus folks.  I'm an ALHAT guy, not a Morpheus guy.
 
2014-05-05 12:25:28 AM  
I just realized that I can legitimately use the "getting a kick out of this thread" Fark meme.
 
2014-05-05 02:33:42 AM  
This is a lander, the F9R is a launch vehicle. They are both cool, and they could work together.
Slap one of these on top of a Falcon and we have a party!
 
2014-05-05 04:03:01 AM  
Dragon is designed for powered landings.

It will still carry a parachute backup.
 
2014-05-05 11:14:54 AM  
Biggest difference here is that SpaceX's first stage is over 12 stories high. They successfully soft landed it over the ocean a couple of weeks ago too.  They say by the end of the year they should be able to fly that sucker right back to the launch pad at Cape Canaveral.  That will change space launches forever, can't emphasize how big a deal this is.

Never bet against Elon Musk, you WILL lose!
 
2014-05-05 12:20:06 PM  

ElLoco: Stuff like this never gets old for me.


This.

The principles are 50 years old, but the equipment, techniques, and approaches to the challenges have been updated. I'm endlessly fascinated by what it took to solve those challenges 50 years ago, and what it takes now to solve those same challenges. Really impressive.
 
2014-05-05 12:21:58 PM  

Beerguy: Damn ..wrong thread...oh well...no one is complaining.


Irrelevant, but not unwelcome!
 
2014-05-05 12:34:36 PM  
Great. NASA now can get 100' in the air.

USAUSAUSA.
 
2014-05-05 12:37:36 PM  
minoridiot

This is the rocket engine which cause a huge grass fire at JSC during one of the tests.

NASA's best and brightest folks.

Rick Romero reporting: "NASA discovers dried plant matter, burns".

// so not impressed w/ anything from NASA these days.
// ok, so curiostiy's landing was amazing, but the probe seems to be falling apart.
 
2014-05-05 12:49:20 PM  
There's a bit of a difference between a lander and a launch vehicle, but it's still awesome.

I won't be fully satisfied until the US gets astronauts back to the ISS on our own.  At that point, we're back in full swing.
 
2014-05-05 12:55:47 PM  
Other than the engine and fuel, the vehicle isn't the developed tech.  It's the autonomous control, navigation and hazard avoidance that's the developed tech.

All our robotic landers are essentially landing "blind".  Because of that, mission planners are forced to choose relatively benign areas to land in, where the chance of landing on a killer rock is low.  The problem is that such areas are "boring" scientifically.

Even the Apollo landers had problems.  They were not autonomous, and flight and stability was all human controlled.  Even with astronauts looking out the window, they had problems.  One landed over a rock that crushed the engine bell, and another landed on a slope that was within a couple degrees of steepness of not being to take off again, and Apollo 11 almost ran out of fuel avoiding a boulder field.

The Morpheus vehicle is testing Hazard Avoidance and final nav to the landing site. There are other projects that are working on visual navigation during late reentry while several kilometers up to localize the vehicle to do pinpoint landing.
 
2014-05-05 01:33:16 PM  
obenchainr [TotalFark]
2014-05-05 12:49:20 PM


There's a bit of a difference between a lander and a launch vehicle, but it's still awesome.

I won't be fully satisfied until the US gets astronauts back to the ISS on our own. At that point, we're back in full swing.

NDT has called LEO a trip to nowhere. I wouldn't call that "in full swing".

// Your children *might* see the U.S. back on track in regards to space. But I doubt it.
 
2014-05-05 01:56:11 PM  
medazinol

Biggest difference here is that SpaceX's first stage is over 12 stories high. They successfully soft landed it over the ocean a couple of weeks ago too. They say by the end of the year they should be able to fly that sucker right back to the launch pad at Cape Canaveral. That will change space launches forever, can't emphasize how big a deal this is.

The stages won't have enough propellant to return to their launch sites.  SpaceX wants to launch from Brownsville Texas and recover the empty first stages in Florida.  They have to launch over empty water for range safety.

They can still launch from Florida, but it will mean a water recovery.  SpaceX can probably build a rocket that can tolerate getting dunked in the ocean, but the risk is losing intact vehicles, as just happened.

Russian subs lurk in those depths, waiting to swipe any technology we drop their way.
 
2014-05-05 06:07:24 PM  
So we're still perfecting the technology to land on the moon and you want me to believe that we did it 50 years ago?  Hmmm.....
 
2014-05-05 06:10:50 PM  

mr lawson: Tillmaster: It would be more so if the control systems actually made the decisions, rather than relying on a pre-programmed sequence.

that is what happened. The craft "found" a good landing site on its own. That was the test.


You should read the article.
 
2014-05-05 06:27:03 PM  

cretinbob: You should read the article.


you should read the thread.
 
2014-05-05 07:09:08 PM  

mr lawson: cretinbob: You should read the article.

you should read the thread.


You must be new here

Yes, the system is onboard, it just wasn't being tested during this flight. It was a pre-programmed course.
 
2014-05-05 07:37:00 PM  

cretinbob: Yes, the system is onboard, it just wasn't being tested during this flight. It was a pre-programmed course.


If you read the thread would have realized what I realized...this is an older video. The new one (which looks a lot like this one) did indeed test out the ALHAT system.
 
2014-05-05 07:38:54 PM  

cretinbob: Yes, the system is onboard, it just wasn't being tested during this flight. It was a pre-programmed course.


This particular video...correct.
Here is the new one (which I thought was posted)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tmkPJUHYdRA
 
2014-05-05 07:47:11 PM  
The methane fuel is something that can eventually be manufactured in space and on Mars. Couple that with the autonomous navigation tech, and you have a lander that can pick up and fly to several destinations, not just land and become a statue.  That's transformational.
 
2014-05-05 09:58:02 PM  
Did anyone else notice a small, shaking object attached to some vehicle structure in the on-board video that looked like a tiny metallic set of fuzzy dice? or maybe, dog tags? Perhaps I imagined it.
 
2014-05-05 10:14:28 PM  
We beat all y'all:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wv9n9Casp1o

Well, guys I worked with did.
 
2014-05-05 11:07:56 PM  

Any Pie Left: Did anyone else notice a small, shaking object attached to some vehicle structure in the on-board video that looked like a tiny metallic set of fuzzy dice? or maybe, dog tags? Perhaps I imagined it.


Those were connector dust covers for the ground power ports. The vehicle manager was a bit rushed at that point and forgot to screw them on when ground power was disconnected.

He didn't realize it at the time since the video didn't get posted on Youtube until we had all eaten dinner and had a few in us.  When he saw it on his cellphone, he went from cloud 9 to about cloud 5.  Funny thing was that none of us would have noticed if he hadn't pointed it out to the group.
 
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