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(Daily Mail)   Good: University puts up anti cheating posters. Bad: Posters include answers to exam questions   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 43
    More: Fail, Plymouth University, Ariel Castro, Megacasino, old boys  
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7456 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 May 2014 at 6:11 PM (15 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



43 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-05-03 03:31:14 PM
The Germans: You just can't stay mad at them.
 
2014-05-03 03:33:35 PM
The formulae cover areas including probability, trigonometry and probability.

They like probability.
 
2014-05-03 04:31:19 PM
If you can write down enough on your own hand to pass a test, I say good for you.
 
2014-05-03 05:33:51 PM
i.dailymail.co.uk

I can't even read that. And are math students really still expected to memorize formulas?
 
2014-05-03 06:26:07 PM

fusillade762: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x630]

I can't even read that. And are math students really still expected to memorize formulas?


Yes, yes they are.
/currently studying for a calc final that's on Tuesday.
 
2014-05-03 06:28:44 PM

buzzcut73: fusillade762: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x630]

I can't even read that. And are math students really still expected to memorize formulas?

Yes, yes they are.
/currently studying for a calc final that's on Tuesday.


Having to memorize anything longer than the quadratic equation seems... foolish. Any math-type people able to offer a rationale?
 
2014-05-03 06:29:13 PM
I had several professors that would let us bring 3x5 index cards with formulae or notes on them. Had to be hand written, and subject to inspection. The idea being that you wouldn't be doing things from whatever vague memories were in the back of your head in the engineering department, and it meant you actually studied for the test.

Now, Dr. Robert Goddard and his goddamned impossible exams... He'd give them to you on day one and graded you on how much you figured out by the end of the course. Imagine, without resorting to FEA, figuring out how much a helically bent copper tube would twist with a given flow rate. And the thing is... There was no answer key to steal, he concocted the damned problems and solved them shortly before grading papers.
 
2014-05-03 06:31:42 PM
I was told there would be no math.

/probably why I didn't finish college.
 
2014-05-03 06:38:42 PM
Math formulas are not "cheating".
 
2014-05-03 06:39:09 PM
Looks like this was only a problem because they put it in a room where a math exam was being administered.

Also, any professor who expects their students to memorize all the relevant formulae is an ass who doesn't understand how the real world works.
 
2014-05-03 06:39:50 PM
So burning textbooks next?
 
2014-05-03 06:41:02 PM

brimed03: buzzcut73: fusillade762: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x630]

I can't even read that. And are math students really still expected to memorize formulas?

Yes, yes they are.
/currently studying for a calc final that's on Tuesday.

Having to memorize anything longer than the quadratic equation seems... foolish. Any math-type people able to offer a rationale?


There is no rationale.  NOBODY memorizes formulas, especially the trig identities.  With math you have to know how to use the formulas to solve different problems.  It's not cheating to look up a formula or have it available.

This article is BULLshiat, then again, it IS the daily fail.
 
2014-05-03 06:41:53 PM

logieal: I was told there would be no math.

/probably why I didn't finish college.


Meh, one semester of Finite Math and one semester of Symbolic Logic was not bad at all. And I spent much of my life as a mathaphobe (until I realized I had been running a large indy corporation on Eve Online for years with spreadsheets and tons of notes and math stuff... then I realized that I needed practical applications to do well with numbers and I decided to build in real life what I was doing in the game).
 
2014-05-03 06:45:12 PM

brimed03: buzzcut73: fusillade762: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x630]

I can't even read that. And are math students really still expected to memorize formulas?

Yes, yes they are.
/currently studying for a calc final that's on Tuesday.

Having to memorize anything longer than the quadratic equation seems... foolish. Any math-type people able to offer a rationale?


It isn't the memorization of the equation - it is how to apply it.  The first step is recognizing the equation.  For some, this looks like "memorization".  But if that's all you are doing, then that exam won't go well for you.  After that there are many additional steps, like knowing all the transforms you can apply, and why you would want to do so.

You can have an entire book of equations in front of you but if you don't know the rules on how to use them they might as well be random lines drawn on a page.
 
2014-05-03 06:46:52 PM

mudesi: brimed03: buzzcut73: fusillade762: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x630]

I can't even read that. And are math students really still expected to memorize formulas?

Yes, yes they are.
/currently studying for a calc final that's on Tuesday.

Having to memorize anything longer than the quadratic equation seems... foolish. Any math-type people able to offer a rationale?

There is no rationale.  NOBODY memorizes formulas, especially the trig identities.  With math you have to know how to use the formulas to solve different problems.  It's not cheating to look up a formula or have it available.

This article is BULLshiat, then again, it IS the daily fail.


Our math department is run by evil people. Yes, you must have the trig identities memorized if you want to pass trig/precalc and beyond. Better know their derivatives as well as the derivatives of the inverse trig functions (arccos, arcsin, arctan, ....) for your exams.

Seriously, there is not an adviser in any department other than the mathematics department that wouldn't like to see their building burn to the ground and the earth salted so nothing could grow there ever again. I really do understand the need to learn the stuff, but unless you're majoring in pure mathematics, their way of doing things doesn't help you learn the hows and whys of why math matters.
 
2014-05-03 06:53:56 PM

brimed03: buzzcut73: fusillade762: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x630]

I can't even read that. And are math students really still expected to memorize formulas?

Yes, yes they are.
/currently studying for a calc final that's on Tuesday.

Having to memorize anything longer than the quadratic equation seems... foolish. Any math-type people able to offer a rationale?


because your professor had to, so therefore you have to.
 
2014-05-03 07:04:02 PM

MadHatter500: brimed03: buzzcut73: fusillade762: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x630]

I can't even read that. And are math students really still expected to memorize formulas?

Yes, yes they are.
/currently studying for a calc final that's on Tuesday.

Having to memorize anything longer than the quadratic equation seems... foolish. Any math-type people able to offer a rationale?

It isn't the memorization of the equation - it is how to apply it.  The first step is recognizing the equation.  For some, this looks like "memorization".  But if that's all you are doing, then that exam won't go well for you.  After that there are many additional steps, like knowing all the transforms you can apply, and why you would want to do so.

You can have an entire book of equations in front of you but if you don't know the rules on how to use them they might as well be random lines drawn on a page.


Pretty much how every math class I've ever taken has gone
 
2014-05-03 07:06:09 PM
i.dailymail.co.uk

Is that question mark on the thumb?
 
2014-05-03 07:09:06 PM
Strangely, there are no posters like that at UNC Cheat, in Chapel Hill.
 
2014-05-03 07:09:18 PM

brimed03: Having to memorize anything longer than the quadratic equation seems... foolish. Any math-type people able to offer a rationale?


I would love for some scientific discovery to be declared unreliable or unusable because someone had all their formulas and references readily available to them.

My professors in college gave us the formulas. Their reasoning was "in the real world, you aren't expected to memorize formulas, but you are expected to know how to use them, and that is what this course is about."
 
2014-05-03 07:10:30 PM
Sorry but the integral of a is ax+c not a+c and logaxr=rlogax and the other log functions are squarely in junior high school algebra so that must have been a remedial math class or math for humanities majors.
 
2014-05-03 07:44:07 PM
... said some stupid lying redditor.
 
2014-05-03 07:45:57 PM
This couldn't be any more of a non-story if it tried.
 
2014-05-03 07:49:22 PM
"Write your answer in a complete sentence." "Name the property shown here."

/have failed math 101 multiple times
 
2014-05-03 07:50:53 PM

brimed03: Any math-type people able to offer a rationale?


Generally, I don't make them memorize much in the way of formulas. It's a complete waste of brain space. Better to see if they know which formula to apply and see it applied correctly. I teach concurrent math in high school, and the college publishes formula sheets to go along with the finals for 1050 and 1060, but not 1010 (which really doesn't need one anyways).
 
2014-05-03 07:55:10 PM

OscarTamerz: or math for humanities majors.


lol
 
2014-05-03 08:30:23 PM

brimed03: buzzcut73: fusillade762: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x630]

I can't even read that. And are math students really still expected to memorize formulas?

Yes, yes they are.
/currently studying for a calc final that's on Tuesday.

Having to memorize anything longer than the quadratic equation seems... foolish. Any math-type people able to offer a rationale?


Same reason the bar exam makes you memorize the entire f*cking evidence code. BECAUSE THEY CAN!
 
2014-05-03 08:48:55 PM

brimed03: buzzcut73: fusillade762: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x630]

I can't even read that. And are math students really still expected to memorize formulas?

Yes, yes they are.
/currently studying for a calc final that's on Tuesday.

Having to memorize anything longer than the quadratic equation seems... foolish. Any math-type people able to offer a rationale?


You don't have to mindlessly memorize stuff, the idea of math is to understand where it comes from. You can memorize stuff, but if you don't remember it on a test you should be able to derive it.

/mechanical engineer
 
2014-05-03 09:01:15 PM

OscarTamerz: Sorry but the integral of a is ax+c not a+c and logaxr=rlogax and the other log functions are squarely in junior high school algebra so that must have been a remedial math class or math for humanities majors.


The limits of the integral are 0:1, and c=0.    Just saying.
 
2014-05-03 09:02:43 PM
I remember in organic chem, we had a pop quiz to which me and a partner had been solving an equation on the board. the teacher came in and handed out the quiz. turns out we had basically written the answer on the board for all to see. everyone got an a.
 
2014-05-03 09:15:31 PM
Thanks I was sick that day and missed the answers.
 
2014-05-03 09:48:16 PM
Nope Dok, if there were limits they'd be noted at the top and bottom of the integral sign and c is some constant not necessarily 0. As written the integral goes from -∞ to +∞.
 
2014-05-03 10:09:42 PM
Definite integralwww4b.wolframalpha.com
Indefinite integral www4b.wolframalpha.com
 From wolframalpha.com
 
2014-05-03 11:16:01 PM

traylor: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x421]

Is that question mark on the thumb?


No, it's a treble clef.
 
2014-05-03 11:24:38 PM
The day and age of memorize to do stuff is long gone. Those who still force this should have their tenure stripped and be promptly fired. I would personally recommend tarring and feathering as well, since they like it so old fashioned.

There's simply too much information to memorize. It's far more important to teach applicative principles and enforce those ad infinitum because it will be MUCH more useful out there.
 
2014-05-03 11:31:38 PM
That's a pretty specific group of formulas. They're hardly going to come up on many exams. Leave the posters up.
 
2014-05-03 11:37:43 PM

nekom: If you can write down enough on your own hand to pass a test, I say good for you.


We got cheat sheets for nearly every engine class I took. Bout half were open book. I studied by organizing and making the cheat sheet. If you didn't know how to solve the problems you were screwed anyway. My cheat sheets were f--king works of art though. My advisor was speechless when she saw one. But if I couldn't pick out where on the sheet the formula I needed to use was instantly I'd never get through all the questions usually.

We also had no proctors. The professor would be just outside if we had questions, but we had to sign "I have neither given nor received aid on this exam". if you helped someone cheat or didn't report you were given a hearing from peers just like if you cheated. First (proven) offense warning, second you're out.

Students from other colleges biatched, yet when they did a study engin had the lowest rates of cheating by far.

Idea was once you graduated you had to be ethical and make sure others were too, otherwise sh-t might go down that could endanger lives. So we had to be trusted in school otherwise how could we be trusted as professionals. My first roommate's ex did get expelled on his second offense.

I liked it. Being babysat when I took classes in other schools was just sad.
 
2014-05-03 11:43:51 PM

ajgeek: The day and age of memorize to do stuff is long gone. Those who still force this should have their tenure stripped and be promptly fired. I would personally recommend tarring and feathering as well, since they like it so old fashioned.

There's simply too much information to memorize. It's far more important to teach applicative principles and enforce those ad infinitum because it will be MUCH more useful out there.


That's my take on it. Let people have a formula sheet--if they know their stuff, they'll know which one to use, if they haven't been paying attention in class, it isn't going to be of much help anyway. Where it really does help is when you forget something like a trig identity or derivative of an inverse trig function and need it to complete the rest of the problem. You might know that you need to put that in there, but if you've forgotten what exactly that is, you're completely screwed. So even though you knew how to go about solving the problem, you get tripped up on something that you'd normally just find on the back cover of the textbook.

Honestly, I'd much, much rather the engineers designing the building I work in and the bridges I drive across use reference materials for the formulas they need to know than rely on memorization. Same goes for the analytic chemists that are checking purity of the prescription drugs, the toxicologists determining what the LD50 of a compound might be, whatever.

I sincerely believe that the math department does what they do because (a) They had to so you should too, (b) They're getting $240 per credit hour. Trig/Precalc is 4 credit hours, Calc I is 4, and so is Calc II. They're making $38,400 per section of each of those classes they teach (average is 6-8 sections per class). So on the low end, they're raking in about $691,000 per semester off of three classes.

Make it more difficult to pass, then you have a bunch of people retaking the class every semester so they can graduate.
 
2014-05-04 07:02:11 AM

mudesi: brimed03: buzzcut73: fusillade762: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x630]

I can't even read that. And are math students really still expected to memorize formulas?

Yes, yes they are.
/currently studying for a calc final that's on Tuesday.

Having to memorize anything longer than the quadratic equation seems... foolish. Any math-type people able to offer a rationale?

There is no rationale.  NOBODY memorizes formulas, especially the trig identities.  With math you have to know how to use the formulas to solve different problems.  It's not cheating to look up a formula or have it available.

This article is BULLshiat, then again, it IS the daily fail.


Really? Because if you weren't full of shiat I wouldn't have failed Probability and Statistics on Discrete and Continuous Time-spaces and would have gotten a dual major instead of just a BS CompSci with a Philosphy minor.
 
2014-05-04 08:12:36 AM
I thought everybody just programmed the required formulas and identities in their calculators.
 
2014-05-04 09:13:54 AM

staplermofo: I thought everybody just programmed the required formulas and identities in their calculators.


No calculators in tests now. You get them back in Calc III and Differential Equations.
 
2014-05-04 10:54:27 AM

StreetlightInTheGhetto: nekom: If you can write down enough on your own hand to pass a test, I say good for you.

We got cheat sheets for nearly every engine class I took. Bout half were open book. I studied by organizing and making the cheat sheet. If you didn't know how to solve the problems you were screwed anyway. My cheat sheets were f--king works of art though. My advisor was speechless when she saw one. But if I couldn't pick out where on the sheet the formula I needed to use was instantly I'd never get through all the questions usually.

We also had no proctors. The professor would be just outside if we had questions, but we had to sign "I have neither given nor received aid on this exam". if you helped someone cheat or didn't report you were given a hearing from peers just like if you cheated. First (proven) offense warning, second you're out.

Students from other colleges biatched, yet when they did a study engin had the lowest rates of cheating by far.

Idea was once you graduated you had to be ethical and make sure others were too, otherwise sh-t might go down that could endanger lives. So we had to be trusted in school otherwise how could we be trusted as professionals. My first roommate's ex did get expelled on his second offense.

I liked it. Being babysat when I took classes in other schools was just sad.


Sounds like UVa
 
2014-05-04 04:10:58 PM

OscarTamerz: Nope Dok, if there were limits they'd be noted at the top and bottom of the integral sign and c is some constant not necessarily 0. As written the integral goes from -∞ to +∞.


Since you chose to not accept the humor in my joke and, further, decided to poke the bear, I will now school you quite thoroughly.

The Riemann integral is intimately connected to the geometric interpretation of integration; i.e., the area between the curve of the function and the domain axis of integration.  If you choose to use the more flexible Lebesgue integration, the same idea works, only now we consider the proportion of the subset space delineated by the function, relative to the total set space, using the Lebesgue measure on the set space as the standard.  If, as you state, the "implied" limits of the integral are +/- ∞, then the integral can no longer a function (at least in this 1-dimensional case), it must be a proportional area or amount.  Instead of being your stated function ax+c (which clearly changes relative to one's choice of x), it would in fact be infinite; i.e., ∞ - (- ∞).  Hence, your correcting definition is incorrect.

In fact, the lack of lower and upper limits makes this expression an anti-derivative (vis. a true integral) in the sense that it is the inverse of operation of differentiation.  As the operation of differentiation is not specific: any family of functions that differ by no more than an additive constant provides an infinite number of solutions to said anti-derivative.  The anti-derivative will always be a family of functions, in this case ax+c.  The nature of the additive constant is to provide an origin for the coordinate system (or metric space, if you prefer).   My choice of origin is x=0.

The joke entailed my choosing to convert the anti-derivative ax+c into an integral by selecting any interval [x,x+1] along the domain of integration, over which the resulting integral takes a value of a; e.g, (ax + 0) - (a(x+1) + 0).  The effect of the joke is to turn the incorrect anti-derivative into a bona fide integral.

Apologies for the subtlety of the joke.
 
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