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(Network World)   Free, open source software is cheaper to adopt than big, bad, greedy Microsoft, right? Think again   (networkworld.com) divider line 15
    More: Interesting, Microsoft, CIO, open source software, commercial software, Red Hat, data dependency  
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3232 clicks; posted to Geek » on 02 May 2014 at 9:04 PM (20 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2014-05-02 09:12:20 PM
3 votes:
FTA: "Microsoft has been flexible and helpful in the way we apply their products to improve the operation of our frontline services..."

So Microsoft's support is more helpful than a bunch of 13 year old trolls on IRC calling you a moron because you accidentally messed up your fstab file and now your computer won't boot? No way. I call shenanigans.
2014-05-03 02:57:26 AM
2 votes:
Open source software does certain niche things very well.  For smaller projects where the up-front licensing costs are the major expense, they tend to do well.  On large projects dominated by training and maintenance costs, the added levels of support you'll get from a paid product generally justify the costs.
2014-05-02 09:57:36 PM
2 votes:
If you have a job that uses nothing but open-source software, for which you had to be specially trained, and you do that job for a few years, and then you want to get a job elsewhere... what are you going to tell them?

"I have no idea how to use any of the industry-standard software, but I'm willing to learn."

Yeah. Good luck with that.
2014-05-03 03:52:43 AM
1 votes:
People who point to heartbleed as a reason not to use open source have not concept of how software is written or maintained.  Even when the source code is readily available, it took two years for anyone to spot the bug.  With closed source, no one is looking.  Management isn't going to authorize the budget for someone to "poke around and see if anything turns up."  So serious bugs *cough* Internet Explorer *cough* only turn up by accident or when an exploit is used to break into systems in significant numbers.
2014-05-03 02:01:51 AM
1 votes:

narkor: If OSS advocates spent one hundredth as much time checking code for vulnerabilities as they do talking about how superior the process was on forums, the code would be bulletproof.


I repeat my previous question: Does proprietary software actually outperform OSS with respect to security?
2014-05-03 02:01:28 AM
1 votes:
"No one ever got fired for buying Microsoft." - CIO, 2014
"No one ever got fired for buying IBM." Data Processing Director, 1984
2014-05-03 01:24:05 AM
1 votes:

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: rustypouch: The thing for me about open source stuff, even though they may work well, the UI is normally terrible and the documentation is ornamental.

Uh. So you've obviously never used Visual Studio or looked up methods on MSDN.

/Thank the lawd for Stack Overflow


IN-FARKING-DEED. MSDN Library entries look like they were written to discourage you from using .NET, and if you do a search on MSDN the best results are links to Stack Overflow.

FYI: Working on my MCSD: Web Applications.

My $0.02 about the article: Microsoft works well for businesses because MS has always been about software for business. It's always seemed to me that open source is about sticking it to MS and companies like them; if you can't join them, beat them maybe (?). No clue, really. What I really don't understand is why every guy I've ever worked with that was a Linux / open source guy had such a shiatty attitude towards everything that wasn't Linux / open source, and everyone that didn't embrace it. I mean, they couldn't have a conversation without biatching about MS. I dunno, I just always found it strange.
2014-05-02 10:24:21 PM
1 votes:
The only time Microsoft is cheaper overall in on end user machines where you can pay a college kid peanuts to do level 1 helpdesk and phone-monkey duty, clearing paper jams and resetting passwords and such. Windows low-level support is easier to find than STDs at Tila Tequila's house party and even cheaper.

Real support gurus for proper servers and high-end network engineering/DB work are hard to find and fairly expensive. They're also mostly really, REALLY good.

I can walk outside and piss on the lawn and hit two guys who can VBScript and call themselves 'programmers'....script kiddies are everywhere. That's the only way Windows machines and their software are cheaper, it's that you can drive 8 or 9 people to suicide trying to support them and still come out ahead in TCO for the bean-counters in Accounting.
2014-05-02 10:10:07 PM
1 votes:

bhcompy: To finish my thought.. you pay more in licensing up front for MS, but it costs you less in basically every other category over the life of the product, and the same goes for supporting enterprise software on the platform.


It really depends upon your admins. If you're lucky enough to have knowledgable Linux admins that are both aggressive in their continued learning and aren't assholes to others, I've got to think Linux servers are still much, much, much cheaper in TCO. That or your server count is massive.

I guess what I'm trying to say is if you have a very talented and knowledgable cast that are mature and nice, even Microsoft knows there's know way they'll ever be a better buy. If you're an asshole, or your cast are assholes and/or morans, MS is insanely cheaper.
2014-05-02 10:05:00 PM
1 votes:

rustypouch: The thing for me about open source stuff, even though they may work well, the UI is normally terrible and the documentation is ornamental.


I used to work for a major electrical retailer in the UK, sorta like Best Buy, and all their in store PCs ran Linux with their retail software on top. That retail software would be no different if it was a Windows machine. In fact the sales guys whose job was to sell PCs had no clue they were using Linux at all.
2014-05-02 10:04:30 PM
1 votes:
In before someone accuses the UK CIO of working for MS!
2014-05-02 10:04:30 PM
1 votes:

a particular individual: If you have a job that uses nothing but open-source software, for which you had to be specially trained, and you do that job for a few years, and then you want to get a job elsewhere... what are you going to tell them?

"I have no idea how to use any of the industry-standard software, but I'm willing to learn."

Yeah. Good luck with that.


Perl, Python etc. can't be used in a Windows shop?
2014-05-02 09:42:54 PM
1 votes:
Partnering with Microsoft never ends well, and many companies learn the hard way.   They treat their partners like complete garbage and their salespeople deliberately torpedo the deals they want to take direct.
2014-05-02 09:28:59 PM
1 votes:
The thing for me about open source stuff, even though they may work well, the UI is normally terrible and the documentation is ornamental.
2014-05-02 09:24:49 PM
1 votes:
No obvious tag?
 
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