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(Washington Post)   I don't see why there is all this hate for Micro$oft. It only took them 11 years to release that security update for Internet Explorer, but they included XP for it   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 133
    More: Misc, Internet Explorer, security updates, Microsoft, automatic updates, Trustworthy Computing, targeted attacks, Windows XP  
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4495 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 May 2014 at 2:24 PM (21 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-05-02 11:57:48 AM
Nice trolly headline

The headline would be accurate if Microsoft knew about the problem 11 years ago. They didn't.
 
2014-05-02 02:27:45 PM
The hate for Microsoft partly stems from IE's very existence, subby.
 
2014-05-02 02:29:46 PM
I would like to see a browser that hasn't had critical security issues discovered years after it's release.
 
2014-05-02 02:30:39 PM
they included XP? Do I get to evolve to my final form?

memeguy.com
 
2014-05-02 02:32:26 PM
I know a guy who works at MS who had been going around with a big smug smirk due to all the heartbleed snafu. Time for some payback.
 
2014-05-02 02:33:41 PM
Does using a dollar sign in place of the S in microsoft drive anyone else nuts? It's just stupid because yeah, they are just about the money, just like every other company. For me it ranks right up there with calling the Democratic Party "The Democrat Party".
 
2014-05-02 02:36:24 PM

cman: The headline would be accurate if Microsoft knew about the problem 11 years ago. They didn't.


Going on a tangent, but was this a flaw something that should have been caught a decade ago after Microsoft introduced new code guidelines that enhanced security?  If it should have been caught, why didn't later audits catch it?  If it was beyond established guidelines, should Microsoft expand those guidelines to cover any new threat patterns they've encountered since then?
 
2014-05-02 02:36:52 PM

olapbill: they included XP? Do I get to evolve to my final form?


No, but you can level up like a normal person. :)

/friggin' Pokemon weirdos....
 
2014-05-02 02:37:39 PM
This failure clearly illustrates that closed-source software isn't a viable model.
 
2014-05-02 02:38:51 PM
Does the end of XP support really matter if I'm using a good antivirus program like Avast and am using a non IE browser like Chrome/Firefox?

Still use XP for my entertainment center desktop computer. See no reason to upgrade it if its main usage is living room internet browsing, streaming video, and some older Steam games.
 
2014-05-02 02:43:23 PM

sotua: I know a guy who works at MS who had been going around with a big smug smirk due to all the heartbleed snafu. Time for some payback.


Really? That's his attitude? Not surprising, but still, wow.
 
2014-05-02 02:44:28 PM
The hate for MS is easy to identify and understand:

People go to their job, boot up their computer and it takes forever, then once they get on, it might take another 20 minutes before the computer runs properly. Then about once a week, maybe, if they are luck, once a month, there is some sort of update and the computer doesn't act right. Inevitably they either have to call the helpdesk or they get some sort of email announcing a company wide problem. Then a fix is pushed out and they are then told to reboot their computers. 30 minutes later, they are working again.
Then they try to get into that excel file and run a report that they do every week but for some reason, there is a ton of data missing or they receive several macro errors. Again they turn to IT, and it turns out a SQL server is messed up and not feeding data into their workbook correctly. So they can't run that report that is due in 30 minutes (which of course they knew needed to be ran all week), and Excel is broke. 45 minutes later they get an email and the SQL server is back up, but now they only show data from 2 weeks ago and all of last weeks information is just gone... Turns out, co-worker Jenny accidentally overwrote the file on Friday of last week, and no, there is no back up of the file from where you worked on it on Friday AM until Jenny screwed it up in the PM... another 2 hours later and FINALLY all that work is done, the boss is frustrated, but nothing could have been done, and screw it, it's 4:30, time to go home.
That is until the next screw up...

Naturally, this is all Microsoft's fault. Not the bloated corporate versions of antivirus, encryption, start up scripts, group policy updates, security patches, inventory auditing, security monitoring and software distribution suites that also start up when they log into the machine... no... It's Windows...

"So screw that, I'm going to get a computer that just "works". I'm going to buy a Mac..."

$4,500 later...

It works, JUST like they thought it would...

"What do you mean I can't play Call of Duty on my Mac? FINE! I'll buy a PS4!"

$600 later...

"SEE! I can do anything without giving Micro$oft any money at all!!!"
 
2014-05-02 02:47:31 PM

Shelbyville: Does the end of XP support really matter if I'm using a good antivirus program like Avast and am using a non IE browser like Chrome/Firefox?

Still use XP for my entertainment center desktop computer. See no reason to upgrade it if its main usage is living room internet browsing, streaming video, and some older Steam games.


Yes. Antivirus and firewalls can't be 100% effective against exploits caused by underlying vulnerabilities in XP that are discovered but not patched.
 
2014-05-02 02:49:50 PM

Shelbyville: Does the end of XP support really matter if I'm using a good antivirus program like Avast and am using a non IE browser like Chrome/Firefox?

Still use XP for my entertainment center desktop computer. See no reason to upgrade it if its main usage is living room internet browsing, streaming video, and some older Steam games.


Keep it offline.
You now have a really nice DVD player.
 
2014-05-02 02:49:55 PM

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Shelbyville: Does the end of XP support really matter if I'm using a good antivirus program like Avast and am using a non IE browser like Chrome/Firefox?

Still use XP for my entertainment center desktop computer. See no reason to upgrade it if its main usage is living room internet browsing, streaming video, and some older Steam games.

Yes. Antivirus and firewalls can't be 100% effective against exploits caused by underlying vulnerabilities in XP that are discovered but not patched.


A buddy of mine works for the DoD Cyber Security division, and they have classified XP as a national security threat... so there's that...
 
2014-05-02 02:50:37 PM

CeroX: Naturally, this is all Microsoft's fault. Not the bloated corporate versions of antivirus, encryption, start up scripts, group policy updates, security patches, inventory auditing, security monitoring and software distribution suites that also start up when they log into the machine... no... It's Windows...


LOL  I get that at my work.  Each year we get really nice computers to replace the old ones and they are quick... then we add in all the network software, anti-virus, etc and they are slow and people complain because their home computer is faster.  No shiat my home PC is faster also but it's not connecting to a bunch of crap in the morning.
 
2014-05-02 02:51:19 PM

nocturnal001: Does using a dollar sign in place of the S in microsoft drive anyone else nuts? It's just stupid because yeah, they are just about the money, just like every other company. For me it ranks right up there with calling the Democratic Party "The Democrat Party".


I'm a Linux Guy. Hell, I'm a UNIX System Administrator.

And I could not agree with you more.
 
2014-05-02 02:52:37 PM

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: This failure clearly illustrates that closed-source software isn't a viable model.


How long was the memory bug in OpenSSL around for the HeartBleed bug?

How long has the stack overflow bug in the TCP packet reassembly buffer of FreeBSD been around?

There is a benefit to open source in that if a bug is discovered and you have the resources, you can fix it yourself.  There is also the benefit that if you have the resources, you can audit the code yourself.  But for most people and organizations, those resources are not available.  So is there really a real life benefit?
 
2014-05-02 02:52:59 PM

TNel: CeroX: Naturally, this is all Microsoft's fault. Not the bloated corporate versions of antivirus, encryption, start up scripts, group policy updates, security patches, inventory auditing, security monitoring and software distribution suites that also start up when they log into the machine... no... It's Windows...

LOL  I get that at my work.  Each year we get really nice computers to replace the old ones and they are quick... then we add in all the network software, anti-virus, etc and they are slow and people complain because their home computer is faster.  No shiat my home PC is faster also but it's not connecting to a bunch of crap in the morning.


Oops forgot to add they are usually the same people that complain about the wifi access and why can't we go to walmart and buy some more routers, they just got one for $50 and it's great, why do you need to spend $500 on an access point?
 
2014-05-02 02:54:36 PM

AspectRatio: sotua: I know a guy who works at MS who had been going around with a big smug smirk due to all the heartbleed snafu. Time for some payback.

Really? That's his attitude? Not surprising, but still, wow.


He was posting on twitter stuff like "oh, BTW, I would like to remind you that no MS product is affected by heartbleed".
 
2014-05-02 02:54:39 PM
What an insanely stupid headline.

Shelbyville: Does the end of XP support really matter if I'm using a good antivirus program like Avast and am using a non IE browser like Chrome/Firefox?


It certainly does. An antivirus application only protects against viruses and, even not using IE, there are still dozens of other things running on the system that can be exploited. For example, say the DHCP client on XP is discovered to have a problem whereby an attacker can send a packet of data to it, crash it and take over the process's shell to run other commands. That's not a virus and a/v software won't protect against it. A firewall might, but a firewall is another process that can be exploited.

These problems DO exist and WILL be used by attackers. They will NOT be fixed by Microsoft (well, except when they will be, like this).

Short of completely isolating the PC, you cannot protect it. And the problem becomes that, depending on what else it can see adjacent on the network, you may not care about IT, but it could be used to attack things you might care about. Even the router itself that's core to your network.
 
2014-05-02 02:56:08 PM

CeroX: "So screw that, I'm going to get a computer that just "works". I'm going to buy a Mac..."

$4,500 later...


$4500? Really? Maybe if you buy the top model Mac Pro plus a huge Thunderbolt display.

I bought a retina macbook pro last year for $2400. That's not small change, and yes it's more expensive than the average Lenovo or whatever, but it is far and away the best computer I've ever used. Super solid, fast, and miles beyond the new windows laptops in use at my office.

This is just one man's opinion, so don't lash out. I'm not a fanatic.
 
2014-05-02 02:56:16 PM

TNel: TNel: CeroX: Naturally, this is all Microsoft's fault. Not the bloated corporate versions of antivirus, encryption, start up scripts, group policy updates, security patches, inventory auditing, security monitoring and software distribution suites that also start up when they log into the machine... no... It's Windows...

LOL  I get that at my work.  Each year we get really nice computers to replace the old ones and they are quick... then we add in all the network software, anti-virus, etc and they are slow and people complain because their home computer is faster.  No shiat my home PC is faster also but it's not connecting to a bunch of crap in the morning.

Oops forgot to add they are usually the same people that complain about the wifi access and why can't we go to walmart and buy some more routers, they just got one for $50 and it's great, why do you need to spend $500 on an access point?


god, don't even get me started down that road. That's not enough weekend/alcohol to make up for it.
 
2014-05-02 02:57:44 PM

Dinjiin: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: This failure clearly illustrates that closed-source software isn't a viable model.

How long was the memory bug in OpenSSL around for the HeartBleed bug?

How long has the stack overflow bug in the TCP packet reassembly buffer of FreeBSD been around?

There is a benefit to open source in that if a bug is discovered and you have the resources, you can fix it yourself.  There is also the benefit that if you have the resources, you can audit the code yourself.  But for most people and organizations, those resources are not available.  So is there really a real life benefit?


$0 licensing is a real and tangible benefit available to all.
 
2014-05-02 02:58:03 PM

skozlaw: you may not care about IT, but it could be used to attack things you might care about. Even the router itself that's core to your network.


img.fark.net
 
2014-05-02 02:59:15 PM

nocturnal001: Does using a dollar sign in place of the S in microsoft drive anyone else nuts? It's just stupid because yeah, they are just about the money, just like every other company. For me it ranks right up there with calling the Democratic Party "The Democrat Party".


I'd say that it ranks up there with the use of "libtard" and "repubtard".  It shows an outward bias.  It isn't just annoying - it also suggests that the person's favoritism might make polite debate improbable, if not impossible, and that their arguments may be exaggerated or even fictional.

In short, talking to a fanboi is usually a waste of time.  I usually flag them, if not outright add them to the ignore list.
 
2014-05-02 03:01:03 PM

CeroX: The hate for MS is easy to identify and understand:

People go to their job, boot up their computer and it takes forever, then once they get on, it might take another 20 minutes before the computer runs properly. Then about once a week, maybe, if they are luck, once a month, there is some sort of update and the computer doesn't act right. Inevitably they either have to call the helpdesk or they get some sort of email announcing a company wide problem. Then a fix is pushed out and they are then told to reboot their computers. 30 minutes later, they are working again.
Then they try to get into that excel file and run a report that they do every week but for some reason, there is a ton of data missing or they receive several macro errors. Again they turn to IT, and it turns out a SQL server is messed up and not feeding data into their workbook correctly. So they can't run that report that is due in 30 minutes (which of course they knew needed to be ran all week), and Excel is broke. 45 minutes later they get an email and the SQL server is back up, but now they only show data from 2 weeks ago and all of last weeks information is just gone... Turns out, co-worker Jenny accidentally overwrote the file on Friday of last week, and no, there is no back up of the file from where you worked on it on Friday AM until Jenny screwed it up in the PM... another 2 hours later and FINALLY all that work is done, the boss is frustrated, but nothing could have been done, and screw it, it's 4:30, time to go home.
That is until the next screw up...

Naturally, this is all Microsoft's fault. Not the bloated corporate versions of antivirus, encryption, start up scripts, group policy updates, security patches, inventory auditing, security monitoring and software distribution suites that also start up when they log into the machine... no... It's Windows...

"So screw that, I'm going to get a computer that just "works". I'm going to buy a Mac..."

$4,500 later...

It works, JUST like they thoug ...


Or get an IT department that knows what the fark its doing and uses modern equipment. Just sayin' I have a 750-1000 user environment 53 servers and a staff of 4 guys and we handle a Dynamics2012 ERP cluster on top of the normal stuff our workstations boot in 3 sec ready to work. You have to limit the end users abilities to install anything and test all patches before you let them auto install. Don't blame MS because your IT guys are too lazy or too limited in their budget to do their jobs efficiently.
Auditing/backups/patches etc should be done after hours and no weekends and shouldn't effect users performance in the least. Invest in your IT infrastructure and your department and they will invest in your continued success.
 
2014-05-02 03:02:58 PM

nocturnal001: Does using a dollar sign in place of the S in microsoft drive anyone else nuts? It's just stupid because yeah, they are just about the money, just like every other company. For me it ranks right up there with calling the Democratic Party "The Democrat Party".


It's super, super childish and annoying.

Shelbyville: Does the end of XP support really matter if I'm using a good antivirus program like Avast and am using a non IE browser like Chrome/Firefox?

Still use XP for my entertainment center desktop computer. See no reason to upgrade it if its main usage is living room internet browsing, streaming video, and some older Steam games.


Like others have said, if it's on a network it's going to be vulnerable. If it were just going to be streaming media locally and no browsing, I'd say from a practical standpoint you're be fine. However if you are browsing frequently and connecting to services outside of your network, I would avoid leaving XP on it. If you can grab a cheap copy of OEM Windows 7 or 8 and upgrade, I'd recommend it. You can also go the Linux route if you want but that might be more trouble than it's worth.
 
2014-05-02 03:04:49 PM

Netrngr: Or get an IT department that knows what the fark its doing and uses modern equipment. Just sayin' I have a 750-1000 user environment 53 servers and a staff of 4 guys and we handle a Dynamics2012 ERP cluster on top of the normal stuff our workstations boot in 3 sec ready to work. You have to limit the end users abilities to install anything and test all patches before you let them auto install. Don't blame MS because your IT guys are too lazy or too limited in their budget to do their jobs efficiently.Auditing/backups/patches etc should be done after hours and no weekends and shouldn't effect users performance in the least. Invest in your IT infrastructure and your department and they will invest in your continued success.


BS you can't even POST in 3 seconds.  You couldn't get an AD/LDAP lookup in 3 seconds.  God forbid you have Novel and Zenworks.  God I hate Zenworks, such a steaming pile of shiat.
 
2014-05-02 03:06:26 PM

sotua: AspectRatio: sotua: I know a guy who works at MS who had been going around with a big smug smirk due to all the heartbleed snafu. Time for some payback.

Really? That's his attitude? Not surprising, but still, wow.

He was posting on twitter stuff like "oh, BTW, I would like to remind you that no MS product is affected by heartbleed".


There's nothing creepier than an overly-proud lifer at a big tech company. It's not just MS.
 
2014-05-02 03:06:30 PM

redmid17: You can also go the Linux route if you want but that might be more trouble than it's worth.


Not if it's just a media computer.
 
2014-05-02 03:06:31 PM

CeroX: The hate for MS is easy to identify and understand:

People go to their job, boot up their computer and it takes forever, then once they get on, it might take another 20 minutes before the computer runs properly. Then about once a week, maybe, if they are luck, once a month, there is some sort of update and the computer doesn't act right. Inevitably they either have to call the helpdesk or they get some sort of email announcing a company wide problem. Then a fix is pushed out and they are then told to reboot their computers. 30 minutes later, they are working again.
Then they try to get into that excel file and run a report that they do every week but for some reason, there is a ton of data missing or they receive several macro errors. Again they turn to IT, and it turns out a SQL server is messed up and not feeding data into their workbook correctly. So they can't run that report that is due in 30 minutes (which of course they knew needed to be ran all week), and Excel is broke. 45 minutes later they get an email and the SQL server is back up, but now they only show data from 2 weeks ago and all of last weeks information is just gone... Turns out, co-worker Jenny accidentally overwrote the file on Friday of last week, and no, there is no back up of the file from where you worked on it on Friday AM until Jenny screwed it up in the PM... another 2 hours later and FINALLY all that work is done, the boss is frustrated, but nothing could have been done, and screw it, it's 4:30, time to go home.
That is until the next screw up...

Naturally, this is all Microsoft's fault. Not the bloated corporate versions of antivirus, encryption, start up scripts, group policy updates, security patches, inventory auditing, security monitoring and software distribution suites that also start up when they log into the machine... no... It's Windows...

"So screw that, I'm going to get a computer that just "works". I'm going to buy a Mac..."

$4,500 later...

It works, JUST like they thoug ...


I live just down the street from this place, and drive past it every day on my way to work.

www.americanprogressaction.org

They are a *huge* employer in Wichita, they donate generously to many local causes, have built buildings on Wichita State's campus and invest heavily in the town, as any responsible wealthy local business frankly should.

Does that mitigate the horrible crap the owners generate with their huge piles of cash? Does it excuse the fact that they buy elections across America just to satisfy their Randian fantasies?

Microsoft has, on balance, more than adequate products and a huge market share. Some of us have been around long enough to remember the people and companies they screwed to get there - so Bill and Melinda could throw chunks of money at their pet causes in their retirement.

\I use their software and operating systems
\\but I get them with the computers I buy or "acquire" - I don't intentionally pay for it
\\\If corporations are indeed "people", this one is an Asshole
 
2014-05-02 03:07:12 PM

Dinjiin: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: This failure clearly illustrates that closed-source software isn't a viable model.

How long was the memory bug in OpenSSL around for the HeartBleed bug?

How long has the stack overflow bug in the TCP packet reassembly buffer of FreeBSD been around?

There is a benefit to open source in that if a bug is discovered and you have the resources, you can fix it yourself.  There is also the benefit that if you have the resources, you can audit the code yourself.  But for most people and organizations, those resources are not available.  So is there really a real life benefit?


IE 6 => Released August 2001 // patched April 2014

Open SSL (Heartbleed) => Released March 14, 2012 // patched March 2014

Open BSD 4.0 => Released Nov 1, 2006 // patched October 2007
 
2014-05-02 03:08:44 PM

TNel: redmid17: You can also go the Linux route if you want but that might be more trouble than it's worth.

Not if it's just a media computer.


To someone who's asking if they should upgrade their Win XP computer? Um yeah it might be. The fact that the Steam games aren't Linux compatible is another thing to consider.
 
2014-05-02 03:09:05 PM
Onion article? Geez. Everyone knows Windows sucks. So do macs. That's life. Try a flavor of Linux & STFU.

/Firefox 29 is tuned, much less of a hog. 25 tabs open @ 350mb.
 
2014-05-02 03:10:03 PM

redmid17: TNel: redmid17: You can also go the Linux route if you want but that might be more trouble than it's worth.

Not if it's just a media computer.

To someone who's asking if they should upgrade their Win XP computer? Um yeah it might be. The fact that the Steam games aren't Linux compatible is another thing to consider.


Not entirely true. Steam's Linux library expands all the time, and Wine can run stuff that hasn't made the cut just yet nicely.
 
2014-05-02 03:10:28 PM

sotua: $0 licensing is a real and tangible benefit available to all.


Which is just one part of the total cost of ownership for a product.  For many companies and organizations, the real costs may come from support, training and reliability.

There is a reason why a number of companies have become very rich providing consulting and support services for Linux and BSD.  Companies and organizations may be bound by terms and service agreements that require a higher level of service and support than can be obtained by the original authors, or even third party services.

So I'd say that you're partially right - it is a potential benefit for all.
 
2014-05-02 03:11:00 PM

CeroX: The hate for MS is easy to identify and understand:

People go to their job, boot up their computer and it takes forever, then once they get on, it might take another 20 minutes before the computer runs properly. Then about once a week, maybe, if they are luck, once a month, there is some sort of update and the computer doesn't act right. Inevitably they either have to call the helpdesk or they get some sort of email announcing a company wide problem. Then a fix is pushed out and they are then told to reboot their computers. 30 minutes later, they are working again.
Then they try to get into that excel file and run a report that they do every week but for some reason, there is a ton of data missing or they receive several macro errors. Again they turn to IT, and it turns out a SQL server is messed up and not feeding data into their workbook correctly. So they can't run that report that is due in 30 minutes (which of course they knew needed to be ran all week), and Excel is broke. 45 minutes later they get an email and the SQL server is back up, but now they only show data from 2 weeks ago and all of last weeks information is just gone... Turns out, co-worker Jenny accidentally overwrote the file on Friday of last week, and no, there is no back up of the file from where you worked on it on Friday AM until Jenny screwed it up in the PM... another 2 hours later and FINALLY all that work is done, the boss is frustrated, but nothing could have been done, and screw it, it's 4:30, time to go home.
That is until the next screw up...

Naturally, this is all Microsoft's fault. Not the bloated corporate versions of antivirus, encryption, start up scripts, group policy updates, security patches, inventory auditing, security monitoring and software distribution suites that also start up when they log into the machine... no... It's Windows...

"So screw that, I'm going to get a computer that just "works". I'm going to buy a Mac..."

$4,500 later...

It works, JUST like they thoug ...


Have we worked together at some point in time? I swear these days happen to me.
 
2014-05-02 03:13:29 PM
slackbook.org
 
2014-05-02 03:13:44 PM
Good thing MS welded IE to Windows all those years ago to kill Netscape.
 
2014-05-02 03:14:27 PM

Netrngr: Or get an IT department that knows what the fark its doing and uses modern equipment. Just sayin' I have a 750-1000 user environment 53 servers and a staff of 4 guys and we handle a Dynamics2012 ERP cluster on top of the normal stuff our workstations boot in 3 sec ready to work. You have to limit the end users abilities to install anything and test all patches before you let them auto install. Don't blame MS because your IT guys are too lazy or too limited in their budget to do their jobs efficiently.
Auditing/backups/patches etc should be done after hours and no weekends and shouldn't effect users performance in the least. Invest in your IT infrastructure and your department and they will invest in your continued success.


6/10

I've heard this type of IT Trolling before, nicely done with the air of superiority but if you're "booting" in 3 seconds, you're not really booting. That's called "waking up".
 
2014-05-02 03:14:51 PM

AngryPanda: redmid17: TNel: redmid17: You can also go the Linux route if you want but that might be more trouble than it's worth.

Not if it's just a media computer.

To someone who's asking if they should upgrade their Win XP computer? Um yeah it might be. The fact that the Steam games aren't Linux compatible is another thing to consider.

Not entirely true. Steam's Linux library expands all the time, and Wine can run stuff that hasn't made the cut just yet nicely.


Once again, look at the question. Steam's Linux library is tiny compared to the PC version, and configuring WINE to run games is often a total PITA (and something I've needed to do multiple times when dependencies upgraded).

Someone asking if their Win XP computer is safe from exploits probably isn't going to want to go through all those issues. For someone like you or myself, yeah it might be worth it.
 
2014-05-02 03:15:49 PM

TNel: BS you can't even POST in 3 seconds.  You couldn't get an AD/LDAP lookup in 3 seconds.  God forbid you have Novel and Zenworks.  God I hate Zenworks, such a steaming pile of shiat.


Good News! We've finally gotten rid of our last Novell crap!
 
2014-05-02 03:17:20 PM
lordargent:
IE 6 => Released August 2001 // patched April 2014
Open SSL (Heartbleed) => Released March 14, 2012 // patched March 2014


 - date of Microsoft exploit being discovered, April 2014
 - date of OpenSSL exploit being discovered, March 14, 2012
 
2014-05-02 03:19:39 PM

letrole: lordargent:
IE 6 => Released August 2001 // patched April 2014
Open SSL (Heartbleed) => Released March 14, 2012 // patched March 2014

 - date of Microsoft exploit being discovered, April 2014
 - date of OpenSSL exploit being discovered, March 14, 2012


Date of Microsoft exploit being....exploited, August 2001

/muddying the waters is a nice tactic.
 
2014-05-02 03:20:15 PM

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: skozlaw: you may not care about IT, but it could be used to attack things you might care about. Even the router itself that's core to your network.

[img.fark.net image 600x381]


That is CLEARLY an HP desktop. Those don't get viruses.


TNel: redmid17: You can also go the Linux route if you want but that might be more trouble than it's worth.

Not if it's just a media computer.


My media server at home is running Plex. So yes, even if it's a media computer Linux is a viable option.
 
2014-05-02 03:21:17 PM

olapbill: god, don't even get me started down that road. That's not enough weekend/alcohol to make up for it.


"I don't understand why I can't have more space. My home computer has a 1000 GB hard drive and you won't even give me 30 for email!"

Yea? Well, fark me. Why didn't I think of that. I'll just run down to Best Buy and grab a few 1TB desktop hard drives, slap 'em right in the SAN enclosure right there. One for each person just so you can save whatever half-cocked horseshiat comes into your inbox with out ever deleting anything!

To be honest, though, that attitude aggravates me a lot less than people who come to me with a question then respond with disbelief when I give them an answer and insist I must be wrong.

Really, asshole? Then maybe go try YOUR brilliant idea instead? Oh, right, you don't have one, that's why you're asking ME.
 
2014-05-02 03:21:26 PM

AspectRatio: laptops in use at my office.


I get it, i do... and i'm not lashing out, believe me... I completely understand... what you guys fail to realize is this though, corporate computers have quite literally all that software i listed in my original post... best analogy can give you is, when you access or write a byte of data on your company laptop, that byte then becomes the victim of a data tug of war between the antivirus and encryption software. They both attempt to access that byte at the same time and it goes through a "mother may I" game before it will come to you, or go to your hard drive. Multiply that by the 1000's of bytes per actual block of information, and then multiply that by however many programs you are running, and yeah, the work computers are going to be slower than a Mac, or even just your home PC if you use one.

So yes, I get it, and at this point have come to accept it...

What bothers me is when people use $$$ to indicate that somehow MS is more money hungry than Apple, when Apple's entire pricing scheme is based on exploiting the frustration people generally feel with their work computers and are willing to pay triple for a system that doesn't come with the emotional baggage that their work computers do...

And the whole excuse about safety and viruses is ONLY because Apple is not the standard for business computing. If it was, the virus architects and hackers out there would spend all their time exploiting iOS instead of Windows...
 
2014-05-02 03:21:29 PM

What_do_you_want_now: I've heard this type of IT Trolling before, nicely done with the air of superiority but if you're "booting" in 3 seconds, you're not really booting. That's called "waking up".


Sounds slow. I have boot button on my monitor that starts the computer in one second.
 
2014-05-02 03:23:31 PM

CeroX: The hate for MS is easy to identify and understand:

People go to their job, boot up their computer and it takes forever, then once they get on, it might take another 20 minutes before the computer runs properly. Then about once a week, maybe, if they are luck, once a month, there is some sort of update and the computer doesn't act right. Inevitably they either have to call the helpdesk or they get some sort of email announcing a company wide problem. Then a fix is pushed out and they are then told to reboot their computers. 30 minutes later, they are working again.
Then they try to get into that excel file and run a report that they do every week but for some reason, there is a ton of data missing or they receive several macro errors. Again they turn to IT, and it turns out a SQL server is messed up and not feeding data into their workbook correctly. So they can't run that report that is due in 30 minutes (which of course they knew needed to be ran all week), and Excel is broke. 45 minutes later they get an email and the SQL server is back up, but now they only show data from 2 weeks ago and all of last weeks information is just gone... Turns out, co-worker Jenny accidentally overwrote the file on Friday of last week, and no, there is no back up of the file from where you worked on it on Friday AM until Jenny screwed it up in the PM... another 2 hours later and FINALLY all that work is done, the boss is frustrated, but nothing could have been done, and screw it, it's 4:30, time to go home.
That is until the next screw up...

Naturally, this is all Microsoft's fault. Not the bloated corporate versions of antivirus, encryption, start up scripts, group policy updates, security patches, inventory auditing, security monitoring and software distribution suites that also start up when they log into the machine... no... It's Windows...

"So screw that, I'm going to get a computer that just "works". I'm going to buy a Mac..."

$4,500 later...


Apple still selling the Lisa?

Of course if the wanted a cheaper Mac, the could get the Mini for $600 or the iMac for $1300
 
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