Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Yahoo)   My house is a bunker. Your tornado is invalid   (news.yahoo.com ) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Vilonia, Arkansas, tornadoes, Central Arkansas  
•       •       •

9052 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Apr 2014 at 3:16 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



44 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-04-30 01:34:03 PM  
Smart design there.
 
2014-04-30 02:30:12 PM  

Rwa2play: Smart design there.


it's smart design even in non-tornado prone places.  they are incredibly energy efficient and low maintenance.  unfortunately a lot of municipalities' outdated zoning laws prohibit it, and just about anything that isn't square and made of sticks.
 
2014-04-30 02:56:18 PM  
Oh, Archie...
 
2014-04-30 03:05:24 PM  

doublesecretprobation: Rwa2play: Smart design there.

it's smart design even in non-tornado prone places.  they are incredibly energy efficient and low maintenance.  unfortunately a lot of municipalities' outdated zoning laws prohibit it, and just about anything that isn't square and made of sticks.


Would it be a smart design in a flood prone place?
 
2014-04-30 03:20:00 PM  

Walker: doublesecretprobation: Rwa2play: Smart design there.

it's smart design even in non-tornado prone places.  they are incredibly energy efficient and low maintenance.  unfortunately a lot of municipalities' outdated zoning laws prohibit it, and just about anything that isn't square and made of sticks.

Would it be a smart design in a flood prone place?


Or from avalanches?
 
2014-04-30 03:20:09 PM  
Underground buildings are cool.
 
2014-04-30 03:20:23 PM  
Appropriate design for a couple of hobbit-like creatures.
 
2014-04-30 03:20:53 PM  

Walker: doublesecretprobation: Rwa2play: Smart design there.

it's smart design even in non-tornado prone places.  they are incredibly energy efficient and low maintenance.  unfortunately a lot of municipalities' outdated zoning laws prohibit it, and just about anything that isn't square and made of sticks.

Would it be a smart design in a flood prone place?


Surround it with clay. totes waterproof. Totes McGoats.

/will hunt down that subby and beat him
 
2014-04-30 03:21:23 PM  

generallyso: Underground buildings are cool.


They usually smell musty.


/Looked at an in-ground house when house hunting
//It smelled musty
 
2014-04-30 03:26:35 PM  
It sounds like the house did not take a direct hit. Sure, most of the place is in the side of a hill, but the tornado would have no problem removing the front of the structure. They did not even have a broken window.
 
2014-04-30 03:26:52 PM  

Gary-L: generallyso: Underground buildings are cool.

They usually smell musty.


/Looked at an in-ground house when house hunting
//It smelled musty


That's because:

A. Moisture gets trapped easily in under ground houses, and
B. Less windows means it's harder to get good air circulation.

My buddy lived in one while I was growing up.  I distinctly remember them running a de-humidifier regularly, on top of opening up the windows to air out the house whenever the could.
 
2014-04-30 03:26:53 PM  
I saw a house kinda like this about 10 years ago the person that built it made it to survive just about anything. It was squat and IIRC it was made of adobe or something that looked like it. It would be nice to see more people build for the area they are in like this.
 
2014-04-30 03:27:29 PM  
And Yahoo articles suck. It took forever for that shiat to load.
 
2014-04-30 03:29:10 PM  
In the future all trailer parks will be built underground.
 
2014-04-30 03:30:07 PM  

Gary-L: generallyso: Underground buildings are cool.

They usually smell musty.


/Looked at an in-ground house when house hunting
//It smelled musty


Let's not forget the predisposition to having excessive radon levels.
 
2014-04-30 03:32:39 PM  
On Tuesday, two Red Cross workers dropped by the house to record property damages, but the Weavers had only blessings to share...

In El Paso, Ark., seven miles on the other side of the Weavers' home, a friend of Jerri's was killed.


I guess Jerri felt her friend being taken out by a tornado to be a blessing.

Sucks to be Jerri's friend.
 
2014-04-30 03:35:42 PM  

Walker: Would it be a smart design in a flood prone place?


No, nor would any other house. Besides, this one is on a slope above the surrounding countryside.

Deep Contact: Or from avalanches?


If you build them strong enough (with reinforced concrete walls a foot thick). This house isn't prone to avalanches.
 
2014-04-30 03:35:47 PM  

Walker: Would it be a smart design in a flood prone place?


You're supposed to avoid building in flood prone places period.  Worst case, you build the earth UP, not dig down.

Also, that's the least-buried 'underground' house I've seen for a while.

Alternatives include things like dome-homes, where the circular shape doesn't really give a twister something to grab on to and has no separate roof to yank off.
 
2014-04-30 03:37:20 PM  
I don't understand why all homes in tornado alley are not cyclone proof, it's not like we do not know how to make them such.

I keep seeing fiberboard house ripped to threads and sad home owner, yet all I can think is well what the fark did you expect?
 
2014-04-30 03:39:49 PM  

killro: My buddy lived in one while I was growing up. I distinctly remember them running a de-humidifier regularly, on top of opening up the windows to air out the house whenever the could.


I feel like you would be able to get around this by working out some kind of ventilation system. I mean, missile silos do this, yes? It wouldn't have to be nearly as complex but have some vent shafts through the concrete to the air above and install fans... Yes? No?
/not an engineer but did stay at a Holiday Inn last night
 
2014-04-30 03:42:36 PM  

Firethorn: You're supposed to avoid building in flood prone places period.  Worst case, you build the earth UP, not dig down.


Or stilts.
 
2014-04-30 03:43:58 PM  
I love how much overlap there is between the hippies and the preppers. Being a backpacker I get to see a lot of stuff that's shared by dreadlocks and huge white beards alike. This house is another great example: build a concrete bunker under a hill and you're saving energy AND tornado proof/ready for WWIII.

How cool would it be if the midwest was just tons of hobbit hole bunkers everywhere?
 
2014-04-30 03:44:35 PM  
I'll be in my bunker?
 
2014-04-30 03:46:15 PM  
I got keen to build an underground house until I realized they cost about 30% more than a conventional house of same size (mainly bc excavation costs and serious engineering for a roof)

But in specific places like Tornado Alley I'd see that as insurance

I think I'd invest in marine ply shutters though
 
2014-04-30 03:52:19 PM  

Kirzania: I feel like you would be able to get around this by working out some kind of ventilation system. I mean, missile silos do this, yes? It wouldn't have to be nearly as complex but have some vent shafts through the concrete to the air above and install fans... Yes? No?


Usually good waterproof barriers and drainage around the it will do the job.
 
2014-04-30 03:57:02 PM  

mjjt: I got keen to build an underground house until I realized they cost about 30% more than a conventional house of same size (mainly bc excavation costs and serious engineering for a roof)


There is also room for lots of cost savings. Many people that have them completely eliminate air conditioning and central heating and just have a wood burning stove for when it gets a little cool.
 
2014-04-30 04:00:35 PM  
There is one like this outside of Wichita Falls, TX, on the road to Iowa Park. It looks like a stand alone garage made of concrete which, technically it is, but it is also the only above ground portion of the home.
 
2014-04-30 04:05:57 PM  

Langdon_777: I don't understand why all homes in tornado alley are not cyclone proof, it's not like we do not know how to make them such.

I keep seeing fiberboard house ripped to threads and sad home owner, yet all I can think is well what the fark did you expect?


Ever heard of a thing called price?
 
2014-04-30 04:07:34 PM  

Pokey.Clyde: Langdon_777: I don't understand why all homes in tornado alley are not cyclone proof, it's not like we do not know how to make them such.

I keep seeing fiberboard house ripped to threads and sad home owner, yet all I can think is well what the fark did you expect?

Ever heard of a thing called price?


I am sure that building a proper house is better than rebuilding a crappy one every few years.
 
2014-04-30 04:15:08 PM  

Langdon_777: I keep seeing fiberboard house ripped to threads and sad home owner, yet all I can think is well what the fark did you expect?


Owners typically are not builders.
 
2014-04-30 04:19:55 PM  
With concrete walls you get a lot of 'sweat' forming. Even in above ground buildings the concrete buildings I've been in have always felt* damp. Dampness leads to possible mold and respiratory problems. Which could mean you're trading occasional safety for a full-time degradation of your living environment.

I dunno how much more safety from tornados the sod roof gives you, otherwise you could just have a reinforced "normal" above-ground home with windows on all sides. For that matter, storm shutters on the windows would be an excellent idea. This home had one vulnerable side, and her saying "it was back out of the windows" - if she could see the windows, she was in an exposed position.

*It's anecdata, a form of data
 
2014-04-30 04:22:42 PM  

JohnAnnArbor: Firethorn: You're supposed to avoid building in flood prone places period.  Worst case, you build the earth UP, not dig down.

Or stilts.


Underground home on stilts? O_o
 
2014-04-30 04:23:06 PM  

Pokey.Clyde: Langdon_777: I don't understand why all homes in tornado alley are not cyclone proof, it's not like we do not know how to make them such.

Ever heard of a thing called price?


Price isn't the problem: a concrete dome house is tornado and hurricane proof, and around 10% less expensive to build and around 30% less expensive in reoccurring utility costs.  

OTOH, they tend to bring surrounding property values down because they look "strange," "ugly," or "menacing," and for these reasons many neighborhoods and city associations refuse to permit them.  Even if you do all the planning yourself and have the plans safety approved federally.
 
2014-04-30 04:24:17 PM  

WorLord: Pokey.Clyde: Langdon_777: I don't understand why all homes in tornado alley are not cyclone proof, it's not like we do not know how to make them such.

Ever heard of a thing called price?


Price isn't the problem: a concrete dome house is mostly tornado and hurricane proof, and around 10% less expensive to build and around 30% less expensive in reoccurring utility costs.  

OTOH, they tend to bring surrounding property values down because they look "strange," "ugly," or "menacing," and for these reasons many neighborhoods and city associations refuse to permit them.  Even if you do all the planning yourself and have the plans safety approved federally.
 
2014-04-30 04:46:04 PM  

Langdon_777: I am sure that building a proper house is better than rebuilding a crappy one every few years.


'hundreds' of homes are destroyed by tornado each year.  Trick is that there are hundreds of THOUSANDS of homes in tornado-prone areas.

There are a few spots where they've moved the town a mile or so just because the tornados were so bad where they originally located, but even in the worst areas you can generally count on your house lasting a few decades before being flattened.

I'll note that hurricane proof homes are also extremely expensive, but people highly desire living in such areas normally.  As such, I've proposed going one of two ways - either build as hurricane proof as you can get($$$) or build as cheaply as you can and just rebuild whenever your place gets flattened.  It's a viable strategy if you're not attached to material possessions, especially if it's a seasonal house/vacation spot.
 
2014-04-30 04:59:37 PM  

Firethorn: Langdon_777: I am sure that building a proper house is better than rebuilding a crappy one every few years.

'hundreds' of homes are destroyed by tornado each year.  Trick is that there are hundreds of THOUSANDS of homes in tornado-prone areas.

There are a few spots where they've moved the town a mile or so just because the tornados were so bad where they originally located, but even in the worst areas you can generally count on your house lasting a few decades before being flattened.

I'll note that hurricane proof homes are also extremely expensive, but people highly desire living in such areas normally.  As such, I've proposed going one of two ways - either build as hurricane proof as you can get($$$) or build as cheaply as you can and just rebuild whenever your place gets flattened.  It's a viable strategy if you're not attached to material possessions, especially if it's a seasonal house/vacation spot.


I agree and I really do like living in a tent (with a pit nearby to hide in.)
 
2014-04-30 05:57:30 PM  
Saw a show about Hurricane proof houses, there was this guy in Fla that built a roundish poured concrete house. Said it could withstand Anything. Sounds like that's the way to go in Tornado Alley. Except for having to design it a little differently, I would think that pouring concrete would be cheaper that having a bunch of guys nailing up a whole bunch of lumber.
 
2014-04-30 06:21:19 PM  
ICF Construction FTW, baby....
(132 cubic yds from footer to 2nd floor)

The very first picture of my house....
i283.photobucket.com
 
2014-04-30 06:42:07 PM  

Langdon_777: I agree and I really do like living in a tent (with a pit nearby to hide in.)


Meh, with a tent and hurricanes(much more predictable than tornados), you simply take the tend with you when the hurricanes come in.

Or you cound set up one of these and have a tornado/hurricane resistent 'tent'.
 
2014-04-30 07:10:50 PM  

Firethorn: Langdon_777: I am sure that building a proper house is better than rebuilding a crappy one every few years.

'hundreds' of homes are destroyed by tornado each year.  Trick is that there are hundreds of THOUSANDS of homes in tornado-prone areas.

There are a few spots where they've moved the town a mile or so just because the tornados were so bad where they originally located, but even in the worst areas you can generally count on your house lasting a few decades before being flattened.

I'll note that hurricane proof homes are also extremely expensive, but people highly desire living in such areas normally.  As such, I've proposed going one of two ways - either build as hurricane proof as you can get($$$) or build as cheaply as you can and just rebuild whenever your place gets flattened.  It's a viable strategy if you're not attached to material possessions, especially if it's a seasonal house/vacation spot.


You also have a helluva time getting the money to build one. Construction loan people don't like anything that looks 'different'. Insurers don't like anything 'strange'.
 
2014-04-30 08:45:06 PM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: And Yahoo articles suck. It took forever for that shiat to load.


Yahoo. Land of a billion ads.
 
2014-04-30 09:54:36 PM  
If I had to live in tornado alley, my house would have to be able to go underground with a push of a button.
 
2014-04-30 10:25:42 PM  

Lapdance: Saw a show about Hurricane proof houses, there was this guy in Fla that built a roundish poured concrete house. Said it could withstand Anything. Sounds like that's the way to go in Tornado Alley. Except for having to design it a little differently, I would think that pouring concrete would be cheaper that having a bunch of guys nailing up a whole bunch of lumber.


I wonder if it got flooded out recently?

And he can't stop a sinkhole.
 
2014-04-30 10:59:08 PM  

Walker: doublesecretprobation: Rwa2play: Smart design there.

it's smart design even in non-tornado prone places.  they are incredibly energy efficient and low maintenance.  unfortunately a lot of municipalities' outdated zoning laws prohibit it, and just about anything that isn't square and made of sticks.

Would it be a smart design in a flood prone place?


I doubt that many houses built "in the side of a hill" are flood-prone if high enough up the hill.
 
Displayed 44 of 44 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter








In Other Media
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report