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(When On Earth)   If you're traveling abroad just assume every attractive woman, rickshaw operator, and street urchin is trying to scam you out of your money   (whenonearth.net) divider line 59
    More: Obvious, scams  
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4342 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Apr 2014 at 9:55 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-30 01:14:28 PM  
Been to Mexico and Jamaica and there are entire subcultures which exist to part the tourist from his money the easy way -- or the hard way.

Depending on where you go, crime is rife and apparently accepted by the locals as a fact of life.

In Mexico I visited a famous Catholic Cathedral -- and was forewarned by the desk clerk at my hotel to be very careful of pick pockets which infest the crowds. I frequently rode the elevator in the company of tiny, incredibly cute women going to or from their Johns in other rooms.

Some of the famous historical sites look really great in the travel videos and brochures -- but when you get there, it's wall to wall tourists, infested with locals trying to sell you over priced everything and the inevitable pickpocket.

Quite often, especially in third world nations, talking to a cop about a crime pulled on you does nothing. In Mexico, half the cops respond better to a 'gratuity' (bribe).

You certainly don't want to get arrested, because most foreign legal systems aint like the US and you can wind up sitting for days in a crappy, stinking holding cell, being served shiat food, trying to unravel the confusing and often misleading judicial systems.

Then, you'll probably have to watch out for local foods, especially in places off the tourist track. Their sense of hygiene in 'native' kitchens tends to be lacking. A lot of tourists get the urge to 'experience the native cuisine' and regret it anywhere from 12 hours to three days later.

Plus the cruise ship I took to Jamaica was Italian and dealt mainly with US citizens. However, the ships doctor couldn't speak English, nor could his assistants. That made for some interesting diagnosis'.

I now restrict my travel within the US.
 
2014-04-30 01:51:56 PM  
Since New Year's of 2013, I've had the opportunity to spend time in the U.S.A., Canada, South Korea,  Vietnam,Thailand, Laos, Myanmar, Cambodia, Bahamas, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, U.S.V.I., St. Martin, St. Kitts, Antigua, Montserrat, Guadeloupe, Dominica, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Grenada, Curaçao, Aruba and Jamaica. When I'm not traveling for my job as professional captain, I like to travel.

I've been scammed a few times. The most egregious was the Vietnamese "Drive Taxi to the Middle of Nowhere and Charge to Get Back Scam." That one was a little scary. Luckily, I didn't get suckered into the Bangkok "Jewel Buyer" scam which is really common, but seemed so fishy that I kept away.

Those few negative experiences were far overshadowed by the great folks I met, still stay in touch with, and consider friends and by the experiences I had.

Travel may not be for everyone, but anyone can do it, to some extent, in relative safety with a little common sense and basic safety practices.

I recommend against staying home out of fear.
 
2014-04-30 03:16:22 PM  

Dogsbody: Bangkok "Jewel Buyer" scam


Thai Gem Scam.

I have not heard of that one before, but it's easily categorized in the same vein as any get other rich quick scam offered to a stranger.
 
2014-04-30 03:22:09 PM  

stuffy: I think I'll just stay under my bed thanks.


That might be full of invisible jumping spiders. Just buy me TotalFark and I'll clean it out for you.
 
2014-04-30 03:57:51 PM  
Stop tourist shaming me. I have a right to travel how I want.
 
2014-04-30 04:35:12 PM  

Dogsbody: I didn't get suckered into the Bangkok "Jewel Buyer" scam which is really common, but seemed so fishy that I kept away.


"Get rich quick" schemes are scams 100% of the time.

"Get rich quick" schemes that involve sending or receiving money or merchandise to or from a foreign country are scams 101% of the time.

"Get rich quick" schemes that a local informs you about in a foreign country are scams 105% of the time.
 
2014-04-30 05:41:30 PM  

Uzzah: Dogsbody: I didn't get suckered into the Bangkok "Jewel Buyer" scam which is really common, but seemed so fishy that I kept away.

"Get rich quick" schemes are scams 100% of the time.

"Get rich quick" schemes that involve sending or receiving money or merchandise to or from a foreign country are scams 101% of the time.

"Get rich quick" schemes that a local informs you about in a foreign country are scams 105% of the time.


Indeed.
I've also determined that most people that come running over from across the street unsolicited say, "My friend, My friend!"
Aren't.
 
2014-04-30 10:54:03 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-05-01 01:45:50 AM  

ChipNASA: Facetious_Speciest: Stay away from bars or restaurants with ladies who look like being used to sell their bodies...

You can't make me!

[www.quickmeme.com image 625x434]


By all means. Do it. Seriously, society needs to stop the stupid from lemming themselves off the cliff for it's own sake.

Honestly, this article sucks. It's all. 1. Thing. Answer: Avoid thing.

Wow, how helpful!
 
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