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(CBC)   Canadian family gives up attempt to live like it's 1986, cuts off the mullets and buys a Nintendo Gamecube   ( cbc.ca) divider line
    More: Silly, GameCube, Guelph, Denton, new year  
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7417 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Apr 2014 at 9:10 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-29 09:14:02 PM  
 
2014-04-29 09:15:10 PM  
done in one?
 
2014-04-29 09:15:29 PM  
That's nothing.  My family and I once spent ten years living like it was the 1980s.
 
2014-04-29 09:16:22 PM  
i.chzbgr.com
 
2014-04-29 09:16:40 PM  
"For one year,a family of four from Guelph has been living the low-tech life -no phones, no computers"

OK, I had ditched my Vic for an ST by 86, but I get that most people didn't have computers.

But... um... articletard, we certainly had phones in 1986. You just didn't carry them with you.
 
2014-04-29 09:19:08 PM  
These are people who don't know what the '80s were actually like.  We had computers, cellphones (big ones but still...), VCRs and compact disks, etc etc etc.  We also had actual MTV, which makes the '80s way better than now in more than one way at least.

Canadians.
 
2014-04-29 09:21:01 PM  
What was wrong with 1986? I seemed to have survived that year and every other year prior to the time now when everyone having computers, smartphones and high speed internet. I remember when CDs came out. Now that was when people acted like we were in the future like the Jetsons.
 
2014-04-29 09:23:17 PM  

Superjew: These are people who don't know what the '80s were actually like.  We had computers, cellphones (big ones but still...), VCRs and compact disks, etc etc etc.  We also had actual MTV, which makes the '80s way better than now in more than one way at least.

Canadians.


You had real MTV, sure, but all the bands on it were shiat.
 
2014-04-29 09:24:20 PM  
It appears it was a productive exercise for  the family. They figured out different ways to connect with each other instead of becoming absorbed in technology which a lot of families seem to be heading in the direction of. Maybe some of you folks don't need an exercise in this, but I bet they bonded better because of it, and won't take their lives and the gadgets that fill them for granted any time soon.

Also, his mullet was rather tasteful. Like a polite mullet, dontchaknow.
 
2014-04-29 09:28:58 PM  

Suckmaster Burstingfoam: Superjew: These are people who don't know what the '80s were actually like.  We had computers, cellphones (big ones but still...), VCRs and compact disks, etc etc etc.  We also had actual MTV, which makes the '80s way better than now in more than one way at least.

Canadians.

You had real MTV, sure, but all the bands on it were shiat.


i291.photobucket.com

/new wave
 
2014-04-29 09:29:13 PM  
Our family had a phone in 1986.  We also a computer.  And a device that linked one to the other.  I connected to Delphi through our local Tymnet node.
 
2014-04-29 09:32:22 PM  
completes the year != gives up attempt

Also, I would like to thank them for not turning it into a reality show.
 
2014-04-29 09:33:05 PM  

Superjew: These are people who don't know what the '80s were actually like.  We had computers, cellphones (big ones but still...), VCRs and compact disks, etc etc etc.  We also had actual MTV, which makes the '80s way better than now in more than one way at least.

Canadians.


upload.wikimedia.org

What a compact disk may look like.
 
2014-04-29 09:33:43 PM  
I thought all of Canada was at least twenty-five years behind the U.S. Didn't they just get indoor toilets last year?
 
2014-04-29 09:37:13 PM  
Wow. Some of you either weren't there, have bad memories, or were living a vastly different life than most of the commoners. In fact, personal computers (s.a. desktops) were very uncommon in the average household. Mobile phones and car phones weren't that common either, mostly they were the playthings of wealthy folks or supplied by certain employers. CD's are more of a 90's thing, sure they were available in the 80's, but again, due to the expensive nature, it wasn't until the very late 80's that they started showing up in homes, and again, it wasn't until the 90's when they became ubiquitous.

I don't actually remember that many mullets, and I grew up in the South. I do recall that rat tails were pretty popular with boys. It's just that you don't see many of them in the photos because hey, it's a rat tail, it's not going to show up unless you're taking a photo from behind. I do very distinctly remember the women with the feathered hair and the giant poofy hair styles. I also remember when very suddenly, women started going for short hair.

Movie-wise, the 80's was a great time for zombie flicks and cheesy creature features. It was a time of puppets and animatronics. Computer graphics in movies were extremely rudimentary. It was the era of Geena Davis, Rosanne Barr, Tom Hanks, Bill Cosby, and crack.
 
2014-04-29 09:38:55 PM  
I figured, since they still regularly sport mullets, Canadians were all stuck in the eighties.
 
2014-04-29 09:39:15 PM  
meblogwritegood.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-04-29 09:43:35 PM  

Suckmaster Burstingfoam: Superjew: These are people who don't know what the '80s were actually like.  We had computers, cellphones (big ones but still...), VCRs and compact disks, etc etc etc.  We also had actual MTV, which makes the '80s way better than now in more than one way at least.

Canadians.

You had real MTV, sure, but all the bands on it were shiat.

I can see how you young whippersnappers say that now, but in the day, they frickin'' ROCKED

Plus it was post bc pill and pre-AIDS, so the sex was carefree and often.  That's why the music is so happy.

90's grunge is so depressing, and rap is all biatches and ho's.

My 16 yr old is learning electric guitar, and his teacher only teaches '70's and '80's stuff.  I love listening to him practice and making the walls shake a bit.

/adjusts onion on belt
// you young 'un missed an awesome decade

 
2014-04-29 09:44:18 PM  
Obligatory

/rock over London, rock on Chicago
 
2014-04-29 09:45:22 PM  

skinink: What was wrong with 1986? I seemed to have survived that year and every other year prior to the time now when everyone having computers, smartphones and high speed internet. I remember when CDs came out. Now that was when people acted like we were in the future like the Jetsons.


Sure, until a few days into it when Challenger exploded.  Then it was all about head and shoulders on the beach and star trek iv.
 
2014-04-29 09:46:55 PM  

Old Man Winter: I thought all of Canada was at least twenty-five years behind the U.S. Didn't they just get indoor toilets last year?


Only in Quebec, the rest of us don't use those Frenchy devices.
 
2014-04-29 09:49:07 PM  
I got a Gamecast ...
 
2014-04-29 09:49:36 PM  

grokca: Old Man Winter: I thought all of Canada was at least twenty-five years behind the U.S. Didn't they just get indoor toilets last year?

Only in Quebec, the rest of us don't use those Frenchy devices.


Yup, we wipe our asses with pine boughs and wash our ballsacks with fresh snow up here.

No wonder American hockey players are such pussies. With their toilets and their melted water coming from taps.
 
2014-04-29 09:52:25 PM  

MrHappyRotter: Wow. Some of you either weren't there, have bad memories, or were living a vastly different life than most of the commoners. In fact, personal computers (s.a. desktops) were very uncommon in the average household. Mobile phones and car phones weren't that common either, mostly they were the playthings of wealthy folks or supplied by certain employers. CD's are more of a 90's thing, sure they were available in the 80's, but again, due to the expensive nature, it wasn't until the very late 80's that they started showing up in homes, and again, it wasn't until the 90's when they became ubiquitous.

I don't actually remember that many mullets, and I grew up in the South. I do recall that rat tails were pretty popular with boys. It's just that you don't see many of them in the photos because hey, it's a rat tail, it's not going to show up unless you're taking a photo from behind. I do very distinctly remember the women with the feathered hair and the giant poofy hair styles. I also remember when very suddenly, women started going for short hair.

Movie-wise, the 80's was a great time for zombie flicks and cheesy creature features. It was a time of puppets and animatronics. Computer graphics in movies were extremely rudimentary. It was the era of Geena Davis, Rosanne Barr, Tom Hanks, Bill Cosby, and crack.



Yup.  We were a fairly technologically progressive house - had a beta VCR even!  Engineer Dad held out against VHS until the 90s because beta was technically superior.  But we didn't get a comp until '90 or '91 I think.  My first cell phone was in 2000 and before then I had a pager.  I think my first CD player was probably around Christmas 1992.
 
2014-04-29 09:52:28 PM  
We had a Commodore 64 in 1986. Played by tons of games on it. Had disk drive, printer, game controllers, and a drawing tablet. Mom still has that thing and it did work last time we hooked it up. It's just so slow. Most of the people I went to school with in my tiny little hick town had one or an Apple. We shared games all around.

Even my grade school had a bunch of Commodores. We played Oregon Trail and other stuff on them.
 
2014-04-29 09:53:43 PM  
Slow news day is canada eh?
 
2014-04-29 09:56:21 PM  

Suckmaster Burstingfoam: grokca: Old Man Winter: I thought all of Canada was at least twenty-five years behind the U.S. Didn't they just get indoor toilets last year?

Only in Quebec, the rest of us don't use those Frenchy devices.

Yup, we wipe our asses with pine boughs and wash our ballsacks with fresh snow up here.

No wonder American hockey players are such pussies. With their toilets and their melted water coming from taps.


How do you melt water?
 
2014-04-29 09:57:52 PM  

MrHappyRotter: Wow. Some of you either weren't there, have bad memories, or were living a vastly different life than most of the commoners. In fact, personal computers (s.a. desktops) were very uncommon in the average household. Mobile phones and car phones weren't that common either, mostly they were the playthings of wealthy folks or supplied by certain employers. CD's are more of a 90's thing, sure they were available in the 80's, but again, due to the expensive nature, it wasn't until the very late 80's that they started showing up in homes, and again, it wasn't until the 90's when they became ubiquitous.

I don't actually remember that many mullets, and I grew up in the South. I do recall that rat tails were pretty popular with boys. It's just that you don't see many of them in the photos because hey, it's a rat tail, it's not going to show up unless you're taking a photo from behind. I do very distinctly remember the women with the feathered hair and the giant poofy hair styles. I also remember when very suddenly, women started going for short hair.

Movie-wise, the 80's was a great time for zombie flicks and cheesy creature features. It was a time of puppets and animatronics. Computer graphics in movies were extremely rudimentary. It was the era of Geena Davis, Rosanne Barr, Tom Hanks, Bill Cosby, and crack.


Agree with everything except the CD part. CDs cost money but it's not like it was so expensive that the common person couldn't afford it. I know because back then I worked at Lechmere's in the Boston area and they sold many CDs and the players as well. I remember Madonna's True Blue came out and that was a big seller on CD. When the Beatles finally started to remaster their music for release on CD people went nuts over it. Then once they heard the music on disc, they complained the music sounded too "clean".
 
2014-04-29 09:59:04 PM  

great_tigers: Slow news day is canada eh?


Beats mass shooting reports.
 
2014-04-29 10:03:27 PM  

Old Man Winter: I thought all of Canada was at least twenty-five years behind the U.S. Didn't they just get indoor toilets last year?


www.theoryofgaming.com

Watch out for the Dire Bears
 
2014-04-29 10:05:00 PM  
And with the Russians acting up and all the Atari stuff they just dug up they  reallythought it was1986.
 
2014-04-29 10:06:48 PM  

MrHappyRotter: Wow. Some of you either weren't there, have bad memories, or were living a vastly different life than most of the commoners. In fact, personal computers (s.a. desktops) were very uncommon in the average household.


Full-up IBM PCs, sure.  Those things really were expensive.  Home computers were a different story.  I got my TI-99/4A in 1983, and I knew plenty of other kids with Commodore VIC-20s and C64s and even one kid with an Atari 800.  The big crash of '83 made the non-PC home computers much cheaper for a time.  (That TI-99/4A was probably $99 in 1983 dollars.)
 
2014-04-29 10:07:04 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-04-29 10:11:05 PM  

Old Man Winter: I thought all of Canada was at least twenty-five years behind the U.S. Didn't they just get indoor toilets last year?


We wish.
 
2014-04-29 10:16:43 PM  

im14u2c: MrHappyRotter: Wow. Some of you either weren't there, have bad memories, or were living a vastly different life than most of the commoners. In fact, personal computers (s.a. desktops) were very uncommon in the average household.

Full-up IBM PCs, sure.  Those things really were expensive.  Home computers were a different story.  I got my TI-99/4A in 1983, and I knew plenty of other kids with Commodore VIC-20s and C64s and even one kid with an Atari 800.  The big crash of '83 made the non-PC home computers much cheaper for a time.  (That TI-99/4A was probably $99 in 1983 dollars.)


Yeah, no. I don't think you and your "plenty of other kids" really counts as being common in the average household. Sorry.
 
2014-04-29 10:17:29 PM  
To be honest '86 wasn't that different from today, certainly not life changing
 
2014-04-29 10:18:05 PM  

im14u2c: MrHappyRotter: Wow. Some of you either weren't there, have bad memories, or were living a vastly different life than most of the commoners. In fact, personal computers (s.a. desktops) were very uncommon in the average household.

Full-up IBM PCs, sure.  Those things really were expensive.  Home computers were a different story.  I got my TI-99/4A in 1983, and I knew plenty of other kids with Commodore VIC-20s and C64s and even one kid with an Atari 800.  The big crash of '83 made the non-PC home computers much cheaper for a time.  (That TI-99/4A was probably $99 in 1983 dollars.)



Those machines all mostly ran on variants of the MOS 6502 processor which was cheap in bulk and enormously popular.  Pretty amazing that an atari 2600, the nes and a c64 all ran on basically the same processor with the main difference being the quantity of available ram and the video chip.
 
2014-04-29 10:20:21 PM  
Wasn't Guelph the next planet after Melmac?

filmjunk.com
 
2014-04-29 10:29:46 PM  

MrHappyRotter: im14u2c: MrHappyRotter: Wow. Some of you either weren't there, have bad memories, or were living a vastly different life than most of the commoners. In fact, personal computers (s.a. desktops) were very uncommon in the average household.

Full-up IBM PCs, sure.  Those things really were expensive.  Home computers were a different story.  I got my TI-99/4A in 1983, and I knew plenty of other kids with Commodore VIC-20s and C64s and even one kid with an Atari 800.  The big crash of '83 made the non-PC home computers much cheaper for a time.  (That TI-99/4A was probably $99 in 1983 dollars.)

Yeah, no. I don't think you and your "plenty of other kids" really counts as being common in the average household. Sorry.


They were a heckuva lot more common than CD players and mobile phones in 1986.  I'd say they were almost as common as microwave ovens and VCRs.
 
2014-04-29 10:33:08 PM  

great_tigers: Suckmaster Burstingfoam: grokca: Old Man Winter: I thought all of Canada was at least twenty-five years behind the U.S. Didn't they just get indoor toilets last year?

Only in Quebec, the rest of us don't use those Frenchy devices.

Yup, we wipe our asses with pine boughs and wash our ballsacks with fresh snow up here.

No wonder American hockey players are such pussies. With their toilets and their melted water coming from taps.

How do you melt water?


Up here in Canada we use this thing called fire.
 
2014-04-29 10:34:47 PM  

TheDirtyNacho: Those machines all mostly ran on variants of the MOS 6502 processor which was cheap in bulk and enormously popular. Pretty amazing that an atari 2600, the nes and a c64 all ran on basically the same processor with the main difference being the quantity of available ram and the video chip.


Yeah, the 6502 even made it into the T-800, and Bender Rodriguez.  ;-)
 
2014-04-29 10:44:31 PM  

im14u2c: MrHappyRotter: im14u2c: MrHappyRotter: Wow. Some of you either weren't there, have bad memories, or were living a vastly different life than most of the commoners. In fact, personal computers (s.a. desktops) were very uncommon in the average household.

Full-up IBM PCs, sure.  Those things really were expensive.  Home computers were a different story.  I got my TI-99/4A in 1983, and I knew plenty of other kids with Commodore VIC-20s and C64s and even one kid with an Atari 800.  The big crash of '83 made the non-PC home computers much cheaper for a time.  (That TI-99/4A was probably $99 in 1983 dollars.)

Yeah, no. I don't think you and your "plenty of other kids" really counts as being common in the average household. Sorry.

They were a heckuva lot more common than CD players and mobile phones in 1986.  I'd say they were almost as common as microwave ovens and VCRs.


U.S. Census info on Computer and Internet Use 1984-2012. Just to save time, this info comes from the Excel sheet they link on that page. In that 1984 survey only 8% of households had computers, in the 1989 survey 15%. In either year they didn't even ask about internet use at home. I assume because it wasn't that common. The first year the census asks about internet use at home, 1997, the survey says only 18% had internet access.

Compare that to the most recent year they have survey info, 2012. In that survey 78.9% of homes have computers and 74% of households have internet access. That's much more common a percentage than the figures from 1984 and 1989.
 
2014-04-29 10:47:33 PM  

im14u2c: MrHappyRotter: im14u2c: MrHappyRotter: Wow. Some of you either weren't there, have bad memories, or were living a vastly different life than most of the commoners. In fact, personal computers (s.a. desktops) were very uncommon in the average household.

Full-up IBM PCs, sure.  Those things really were expensive.  Home computers were a different story.  I got my TI-99/4A in 1983, and I knew plenty of other kids with Commodore VIC-20s and C64s and even one kid with an Atari 800.  The big crash of '83 made the non-PC home computers much cheaper for a time.  (That TI-99/4A was probably $99 in 1983 dollars.)

Yeah, no. I don't think you and your "plenty of other kids" really counts as being common in the average household. Sorry.

They were a heckuva lot more common than CD players and mobile phones in 1986.  I'd say they were almost as common as microwave ovens and VCRs.


You would be incorrect.
 
2014-04-29 10:56:53 PM  

great_tigers: Suckmaster Burstingfoam: grokca: Old Man Winter: I thought all of Canada was at least twenty-five years behind the U.S. Didn't they just get indoor toilets last year?

Only in Quebec, the rest of us don't use those Frenchy devices.

Yup, we wipe our asses with pine boughs and wash our ballsacks with fresh snow up here.

No wonder American hockey players are such pussies. With their toilets and their melted water coming from taps.

How do you melt water?


Apparently, when the temperature gets above 0C, it just happens. Can't reckon I ever saw it happen myself though.
 
2014-04-29 11:00:23 PM  
Another data point for computers and cd's being in full swing by the mid-'80s.

My family and no less than six of my friends' families had commodore 64's in our houses, being used as a family computer (more or less) by 1984.  This was after having cut my teeth on cp/m on the family's kaypro business computer and basic on friends' trs-80's in 1981-83.  By '86 computers were very common, both at home and on campus.  Units were not that expensive, ranging from $600-$1500 US.

Internet was available (by phone modem), usenet was up and running, and there was already a thriving computer games ecosystem (infocom, electronic arts, broderbund, etc.).  I wasted a good portion of the mid 1980's playing computer games that were every bit as engaging as they are today.  Plus Atari and Intellivision.

CD players hit the market in late 1985.  Adoption was quick, and by mid-1987 there was a growing wall of cd's at tower records with plenty of choices for the young audiophile.  Portable cd players (the cd walkman) were around in 1986 too, so you could take a stack of discs, a good pair of headphones and really enjoy high-quality audio without tape hiss anywhere you wanted.  Magic.

And you did NOT just diss '80s bands, nuh-uh.

I remain entirely unimpressed with this family's weak-ass attention-grab.  Although, as someone pointed out above, Canada in 1985 may very well have been nothing but wall-to-wall bears stacked on wolverines, so there's that.
 
2014-04-29 11:02:36 PM  
Canadakota
 
2014-04-29 11:03:32 PM  

The Third Man: Obligatory

/rock over London, rock on Chicago


"Tell the barber you're tired of looking like an asshole"

/RIP, gentle giant...
 
2014-04-29 11:07:27 PM  
Some of you don't know what "common" means, let alone "very common." See skinink's post above. (On my cell, can't properly quote/trim.)
 
2014-04-29 11:16:08 PM  

skinink: im14u2c:  They were a heckuva lot more common than CD players and mobile phones in 1986.  I'd say they were almost as common as microwave ovens and VCRs.

U.S. Census info on Computer and Internet Use 1984-2012. Just to save time, this info comes from the Excel sheet they link on that page. In that 1984 survey only 8% of households had computers, in the 1989 survey 15%. In either year they didn't even ask about internet use at home. I assume because it wasn't that common. The first year the census asks about internet use at home, 1997, the survey says only 18% had internet access.

Compare that to the most recent year they have survey info, 2012. In that survey 78.9% of homes have computers and 74% of households have internet access. That's much more common a percentage than the figures from 1984 and 1989.


 Ok, so about 10% of households in 1986.  (Although Commodore was claiming more like 15% for the same time frame.)  Not average, but also not terribly uncommon.  And, as compared to CD players, much more common, as only 1% of households had a CD player in 1986 according to this source:


http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09548969009390298?journal Co de=ccut20#.U2Bm5TkidjA

And I guess according to this, microwave ovens were about twice as popular as computers by 1986:  http://www.bls.gov/cpi/cpimwo.htm
 
2014-04-29 11:20:11 PM  
img.fark.net
 
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