If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Forbes)   As strange as it may seem, Vladimir Putin, the bare-chested, horse riding tiger hunter, is about to be taken down by a bunch of accountants   (forbes.com) divider line 257
    More: Interesting, Vladimir Putin, horse riding, Russia, Obama, Rosneft, Igor Sechin, Treasury Department, global financial system  
•       •       •

16495 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Apr 2014 at 9:55 AM (34 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



257 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-04-29 08:54:16 AM  
Interesting read.  Thanks, subby.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-04-29 09:08:38 AM  
While asset freezes and visa bans are somewhat of a nuisance-Yakunin's children live abroad-the real strength of the sanctions lie in the fact that they are designations. In effect, they are the financial equivalent of leprosy, discouraging financial institutions from touching the targeted entity in any way.

Reminds me of the story about the Indonesian woman who was mistakenly added to the no fly list. With a lot of work she could get off the list, but the real harm was indirect. TSA told the State Department she was on the list, and the embassy refused to give her a visa because she was a terrorist.
 
2014-04-29 09:17:00 AM  
Not a hit piece on Obama?  From Forbes?

I had to check my cable to make sure I was connected to the normal internet.
 
2014-04-29 09:38:52 AM  
Start playing minus-sum games with geopolitics, and geopolitics starts playing minus-sum games with your economy.
 
2014-04-29 09:43:14 AM  
I'd like to think this is true, or a good guess in any event. Maybe it is.

But Putin's endgame may not be one in which Russia emerges stronger, wealthier, and a bigger player on the international scene. If he emerges with an even tighter grip on a weaker country that feels less obliged to play nice with Europe, he'll probably call that a win.

Then again, if that's the move he wants to make, there's pretty much no stopping him--at least from outside the country.
 
2014-04-29 09:48:03 AM  

Diogenes: Not a hit piece on Obama?  From Forbes?

I had to check my cable to make sure I was connected to the normal internet.


Don't be so certain. I'm sure that somehow this is bad news for Obama.
 
2014-04-29 09:57:06 AM  
It's how they took down Al Capone
 
2014-04-29 09:58:15 AM  
The sanctions are really working in Cuba.
 
2014-04-29 09:58:58 AM  
i.imgur.com
 
2014-04-29 10:01:36 AM  
Pooty Poot has some competition...

ts1.mm.bing.net
 
2014-04-29 10:01:43 AM  

Fano: It's how they took down Al Capone


Came here to say that.

Real justice doesn't come from guns and fancy gizmos, it comes from patience and paperwork.
 
2014-04-29 10:01:58 AM  

Fano: It's how they took down Al Capone


That was my first thought. For all the efforts of Elliot Ness, none of those charges stuck. Capone was imprisoned for tax fraud found out by FBI bean-counters.
 
2014-04-29 10:02:43 AM  
The objective of these sanctions are to get Russia to change its behavior.....'unlikey' tag goes here
 
2014-04-29 10:03:07 AM  
Yeah, let's see how this works. Check back in one year to see how this worked out.
 
2014-04-29 10:03:32 AM  
What does this mean for the Ruple alliance that Russia and China are joining together to destroy the US Dollar with? Because my dad and a bunch of his Facebook friends keep posting that crap...
 
2014-04-29 10:03:45 AM  

under a mountain: The sanctions are really working in Cuba.


And Iran, N Korea, Syria etc.
 
2014-04-29 10:04:16 AM  
It sounds fun, but it also brings up the way people said Germany wouldn't got to war with France in 1914 because France was their largest trading partner.

And the way people said Germany wouldn't invade France in World War II because, well, the same reason.

Economics as an applied war preventative has a long history of being deeply, deeply wrong.

Even after wars start, people keep trying to find reasons why war "can't work." Like the ones who said World War I would end in just a few months because everyone would run out of money. It didn't.
 
2014-04-29 10:04:23 AM  
Always follow the money

/accountant
 
2014-04-29 10:05:06 AM  

He's a man's man.




www.themoscowtimes.com
 
2014-04-29 10:05:11 AM  

karnal: The objective of these sanctions are to get Russia to change its behavior.....'unlikey' tag goes here


Putin doesn't run Russia by himself, he runs it with the help of corporate oligarchs. Those people love their money more than they love Putin; when they start making less money, Putin's going to start feeling the pressure.
 
2014-04-29 10:06:32 AM  
The accountants are taking him down in much the way accountants took Capone down. Makes sense. From what my friends from Russia tell me, things are now run by businesses that are essentially the Russian version of the mafia.
 
2014-04-29 10:06:57 AM  
Would not a drone strike be cheaper?
 
2014-04-29 10:08:08 AM  
The Iron Bank don't fark around.
 
2014-04-29 10:08:57 AM  

DeaH: Russian version of the mafia


So the polish equivalent of Italian food?
That has to be a stinky job.
 
2014-04-29 10:09:05 AM  
Meh. If we're not waterboarding someone, we're weak on terror.

Thanks, Fartbongo.
 
2014-04-29 10:10:01 AM  

volodya: Yeah, let's see how this works. Check back in one year to see how this worked out.


This says nothing but implies that you know something. How about you make your prediction and then we'll see how clever you were in a year?
 
2014-04-29 10:10:17 AM  

semiotix: I'd like to think this is true, or a good guess in any event. Maybe it is.

But Putin's endgame may not be one in which Russia emerges stronger, wealthier, and a bigger player on the international scene. If he emerges with an even tighter grip on a weaker country that feels less obliged to play nice with Europe, he'll probably call that a win.

Then again, if that's the move he wants to make, there's pretty much no stopping him--at least from outside the country.


Possibly, but in any country with a G-20 sized economy, consolidation of power isn't accomplished through foolish foreign policy.  There's a huge financial component provided by moneyed interests who wish to purchase policy in exchange for their cash.  These people are generally interested in the health of the economy and if Putin flushes the Russian economy down the toilet, they're going to find a strong man who won't and have him installed.
 
2014-04-29 10:10:55 AM  
Vlad Capone czar of the Moscow crime family.
 
2014-04-29 10:10:55 AM  
These sanctions seem pretty powerful, but on the other hand if Putin goes all "BLERG I'M A DICTATOR NOW AND ITS US AGAINST THE WORLD" then they won't do much.   So, it stops him from maintaining the current path, but the far more frightening path is still wide open.
 
2014-04-29 10:11:33 AM  

Wooly Bully: volodya: Yeah, let's see how this works. Check back in one year to see how this worked out.

This says nothing but implies that you know something. How about you make your prediction and then we'll see how clever you were in a year?


I took the comment as him lamenting that sanctions take time to work and he'd much rather... ummm...  invade the Ukraine I guess?  Or do nothing, I suppose... but that would take much, much longer than a year.
 
2014-04-29 10:12:51 AM  
I think this was the most pertinent quote "Russians will begin to remember what the Soviet Union was really like."

The good ole days seem dandy until you remember what the good ole days were actually like.
 
2014-04-29 10:13:58 AM  

cirby: It sounds fun, but it also brings up the way people said Germany wouldn't got to war with France in 1914 because France was their largest trading partner.

And the way people said Germany wouldn't invade France in World War II because, well, the same reason.

Economics as an applied war preventative has a long history of being deeply, deeply wrong.

Even after wars start, people keep trying to find reasons why war "can't work." Like the ones who said World War I would end in just a few months because everyone would run out of money. It didn't.


The two situations are not comparable. Germany in 1914 had one of the most powerful militaries in the world. Russia doesn't and can't go to war with Europe and the US. The sanctions are a way to make Russia's current foreign policy too expensive while still keeping US troops out of Eastern Europe.
 
2014-04-29 10:14:21 AM  
If I were short and balding and had an amorphous and non-masculine build, I wouldn't take shirtless photos on a sickly looking horse. Does anyone look at that photo and think that he looks tough?

www.tomatobubble.com
 
2014-04-29 10:14:49 AM  
So out of curiosity, when assets are "frozen" where does that money go?
 
2014-04-29 10:16:15 AM  

DubtodaIll: So out of curiosity, when assets are "frozen" where does that money go?


it doesn't, hence "frozen"
 
2014-04-29 10:17:02 AM  

DubtodaIll: So out of curiosity, when assets are "frozen" where does that money go?


Let it go, let it go...
 
2014-04-29 10:17:06 AM  

cirby: It sounds fun, but it also brings up the way people said Germany wouldn't got to war with France in 1914 because France was their largest trading partner.

And the way people said Germany wouldn't invade France in World War II because, well, the same reason.

Economics as an applied war preventative has a long history of being deeply, deeply wrong.

Even after wars start, people keep trying to find reasons why war "can't work." Like the ones who said World War I would end in just a few months because everyone would run out of money. It didn't.


It's no longer a war preventative, it's a war tactic. It's being applied in places like Cuba and North Korea, and it's working because neither of those countries are in any way a threat to us.  Will it cause the people to rise up and overthrow their governments? Maybe, maybe not, but those countries can't attack us in any real way, and that's the goal.

A collapsed economy is essentially what killed the Soviet Union. While rebuilding under capitalism hasn't been easy, it's got to be preferable to what they had before. If Putin doesn't find a graceful way out of the sanctions, he'll be finished before too long.
 
2014-04-29 10:17:49 AM  
The Iron Bank of Braavos will always have its due.
 
2014-04-29 10:18:06 AM  
treasure.diylol.com
 
2014-04-29 10:18:29 AM  
extensive social benefits to keep the populace docile.


you had to derp, couldn't just write an article without sacrificing your credibility to the trickle down economics god.
 
2014-04-29 10:20:29 AM  

Voiceofreason01: Germany in 1914 had one of the most powerful militaries in the world. Russia doesn't


....

Yes, they do. They might not be at their Cold War levels, but the Russian armed forces are still pretty powerful.

Just a question: How many top of the line militaries do you think there are in the world? Hint: Around 10 or so. Double Hint: Russia is in that 10.

Who do you think has better military? Russia is the second largest weapon seller in the world.
 
2014-04-29 10:21:10 AM  

Langdon_777: The good ole days seem dandy until you remember what the good ole days were actually like.


Indeed! You wouldn't believe how many young Russians lecture me on the greatness of those good ole days - and I've lived through them! :)

As for moneyed interests - you've mistaken the stars with their reflections in the pond. In Russia, money are secondary to power. Oligarchs, each and every one of them, are afraid of Putin and will do anything to keep on his good side. Money they can steal again, more and more, as long as they are in Putin's favor. But they have only one life. Remember Khodorkovsky.  http://www.euronews.com/2014/04/28/oil-tycoon-khodorkovsky-downplays- s anctions-weapon-in-ukraine-crisis/
 
2014-04-29 10:21:38 AM  
if we do this too much though, arent we just going to spur the creation of a shadow financial system where the financiers of terrorism or organized crime or rogue states just funnel their cash through ostensibly clean, but scruple-less bankers?
 
2014-04-29 10:22:22 AM  

Voiceofreason01: DubtodaIll: So out of curiosity, when assets are "frozen" where does that money go?

it doesn't, hence "frozen"


Yeah but lets say the person whose assets were frozen meets an untimely end or is declared a terrorist or whatever other illegal status, what then?  I don't think that our government would honor any will and testament for the intention of those funds if we had already put sanctions on them.
 
2014-04-29 10:23:01 AM  

Necronic: These sanctions seem pretty powerful, but on the other hand if Putin goes all "BLERG I'M A DICTATOR NOW AND ITS US AGAINST THE WORLD" then they won't do much.   So, it stops him from maintaining the current path, but the far more frightening path is still wide open.


But that's not terribly persuasive to most Russians.  Unless he's going to go Nuclear... which he won't, since he kills himself if he does that...  he's going to throw the Russian army into the Ukraine where it's going to have exactly the same kind of welcome the US got in Afghanistan and Iraq?  Russian isn't in nearly the shape the US was financially or militarily prior to 2002.  It won't have the financial stamina or operational ability the US did, PLUS it's going to likely be a more difficult occupation because Europe will step in before it gets too out of hand.  Even if it's mostly special forces anti-occupation guerrilla stuff.

Putin's an ego guy... you can tell that from how he speaks and the ridiculous way he presents himself.  He's not going to lose face by fighting a losing war in the Ukraine, and he probably wants to stay alive too much to start a nuclear exchange.
 
2014-04-29 10:25:19 AM  

BiblioTech: Interesting read.  Thanks, subby.


Yes indeed it was.  Thank you subby.
 
2014-04-29 10:25:47 AM  

DubtodaIll: So out of curiosity, when assets are "frozen" where does that money go?


To the island of Misfit Assets

lilyincanada.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-04-29 10:25:52 AM  

Orgasmatron138: A collapsed economy is essentially what killed the Soviet Union.


Pretty much. I have right-wing friends who, simultaneously, LOVE Putin, but also are crying out on Facebook about how we 100% have to send hundreds of thousands of troops to Eastern Europe in order to "show Putin what we got" and prepare for war against him.

I never understood why (generally, of course) so many right-wing politicians their constituents jump at any chance given to go to war. It's like some sort of over-compensation for having a small dick, so you buy a $150,000 sports car.
 
2014-04-29 10:27:07 AM  
Didn't we try this same strategy with Japan in the late 30's?
 
2014-04-29 10:27:56 AM  

Bonanza Jellybean: if we do this too much though, arent we just going to spur the creation of a shadow financial system where the financiers of terrorism or organized crime or rogue states just funnel their cash through ostensibly clean, but scruple-less bankers?


They keep this up, those Russian bankers will be... ruple... less bankers!

...I'll show myself out.
 
Displayed 50 of 257 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report