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(Washington Post)   The secret behind the mantis shrimp's mighty, shell-splitting clubs is slightly twisted   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 19
    More: Cool  
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3217 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Apr 2014 at 1:13 PM (12 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-28 12:26:04 PM
cdn.shopify.com
 
2014-04-28 01:06:37 PM
It's fascinating how many cool technological breakthroughs we make by disassembling animals.
 
2014-04-28 01:30:31 PM
 
2014-04-28 01:36:23 PM
I had a peacock mantis as a pet before so I expect I will get a kick.
 
2014-04-28 01:40:37 PM
I think it's actually the force the shrimp delivers the "punch" with and not so much the structure of the "clubs".
 
2014-04-28 01:46:25 PM

Strik3r: I think it's actually the force the shrimp delivers the "punch" with and not so much the structure of the "clubs".


Every action has an equal and opposite reaction. When the shrimp hits a mollusk shell, the mollusk shell hits the shrimp back with the equal, opposite force. The clubs would shatter like the mollusk shell if they could not take the force applied to them. Therefore they must have an unusual structure to allow for such high forces.
 
2014-04-28 01:59:28 PM

cgraves67: Strik3r: I think it's actually the force the shrimp delivers the "punch" with and not so much the structure of the "clubs".

Every action has an equal and opposite reaction. When the shrimp hits a mollusk shell, the mollusk shell hits the shrimp back with the equal, opposite force. The clubs would shatter like the mollusk shell if they could not take the force applied to them. Therefore they must have an unusual structure to allow for such high forces.


certainly, the lack of the ability to generate this force would remove any need for specially designed shell that can withstand it.

The shrimps ability to deliver such a ferocious punch is what inevitably lead to the development of a stronger shell. (not the other way around...)
 
2014-04-28 02:08:37 PM
I've yet to see the most important question about the mantis shrimp good eatin'?

According to Yahoo, it is.
 
2014-04-28 02:16:45 PM
fbcdn-sphotos-c-a.akamaihd.net
 
2014-04-28 03:57:13 PM

Strik3r: cgraves67: Strik3r: I think it's actually the force the shrimp delivers the "punch" with and not so much the structure of the "clubs".

Every action has an equal and opposite reaction. When the shrimp hits a mollusk shell, the mollusk shell hits the shrimp back with the equal, opposite force. The clubs would shatter like the mollusk shell if they could not take the force applied to them. Therefore they must have an unusual structure to allow for such high forces.

certainly, the lack of the ability to generate this force would remove any need for specially designed shell that can withstand it.

The shrimps ability to deliver such a ferocious punch is what inevitably lead to the development of a stronger shell. (not the other way around...)


Well, no. If the strong punch came first they would die from punching things due to the weak shell. That would mean no passing on genes. Develop the strong shell first, however, and they would survive and breed at least as well as other mantis shrimp... thus when one of the strong shell shrimp eventually mutated the strong punch gene they'd survive and pass on both. The other way wouldn't work...
 
2014-04-28 04:01:42 PM

Telos: Strik3r: cgraves67: Strik3r: I think it's actually the force the shrimp delivers the "punch" with and not so much the structure of the "clubs".

Every action has an equal and opposite reaction. When the shrimp hits a mollusk shell, the mollusk shell hits the shrimp back with the equal, opposite force. The clubs would shatter like the mollusk shell if they could not take the force applied to them. Therefore they must have an unusual structure to allow for such high forces.

certainly, the lack of the ability to generate this force would remove any need for specially designed shell that can withstand it.

The shrimps ability to deliver such a ferocious punch is what inevitably lead to the development of a stronger shell. (not the other way around...)

Well, no. If the strong punch came first they would die from punching things due to the weak shell. That would mean no passing on genes. Develop the strong shell first, however, and they would survive and breed at least as well as other mantis shrimp... thus when one of the strong shell shrimp eventually mutated the strong punch gene they'd survive and pass on both. The other way wouldn't work...


It's much more likely that they developed together.

As any guitarist will tell you, fingers become calloused from playing the instrument repeatedly. After a while the fingers become calloused. This facilitates the evolution of the skill itself. Rarely does the skill evolve from a genetic mutation. It's typically the opposite.
 
2014-04-28 04:15:14 PM
content8.flixster.com
 
2014-04-28 04:16:02 PM

Optimal_Illusion: Rifftrax has a thing or two to say about Mantis Shrimp.


Fred Saberhagen did a short story once where a bunch of aquatic mini-berserkers were dropped into an ocean that had been seeded with mantis shrimp.   The Berserkers lost
 
2014-04-28 04:19:14 PM

Telos: Well, no. If the strong punch came first they would die from punching things due to the weak shell.


There are other species of mantis shrimp that retain the blindingly fast strike but employ a cutting/piercing attack instead of a clubbing one.

This implies that the fast strike came first, and then the two groups diverged based on their strategy for using the strike.

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-04-28 05:53:13 PM

Magorn: Optimal_Illusion: Rifftrax has a thing or two to say about Mantis Shrimp.

Fred Saberhagen did a short story once where a bunch of aquatic mini-berserkers were dropped into an ocean that had been seeded with mantis shrimp.   The Berserkers lost


Bloody water hides the slashers, heed them, seed them, sue the splashers.

"You couldn't hold it like that if it was alive."
"Yes, yes I could....."
 
2014-04-28 06:59:57 PM

Nix Nightbird: It's fascinating how many cool technological breakthroughs we make by disassembling animals.



Like the bacon double-cheeseburger.
 
2014-04-28 07:52:08 PM

Optimal_Illusion: Magorn: Optimal_Illusion: Rifftrax has a thing or two to say about Mantis Shrimp.

Fred Saberhagen did a short story once where a bunch of aquatic mini-berserkers were dropped into an ocean that had been seeded with mantis shrimp.   The Berserkers lost

Bloody water hides the slashers, heed them, seed them, sue the splashers.

"You couldn't hold it like that if it was alive."
"Yes, yes I could....."


Have a compilation of short stories..  that,s one of them... good read......
 
2014-04-29 12:21:22 AM

Strik3r: Telos: Strik3r: cgraves67: Strik3r: I think it's actually the force the shrimp delivers the "punch" with and not so much the structure of the "clubs".

Every action has an equal and opposite reaction. When the shrimp hits a mollusk shell, the mollusk shell hits the shrimp back with the equal, opposite force. The clubs would shatter like the mollusk shell if they could not take the force applied to them. Therefore they must have an unusual structure to allow for such high forces.

certainly, the lack of the ability to generate this force would remove any need for specially designed shell that can withstand it.

The shrimps ability to deliver such a ferocious punch is what inevitably lead to the development of a stronger shell. (not the other way around...)

Well, no. If the strong punch came first they would die from punching things due to the weak shell. That would mean no passing on genes. Develop the strong shell first, however, and they would survive and breed at least as well as other mantis shrimp... thus when one of the strong shell shrimp eventually mutated the strong punch gene they'd survive and pass on both. The other way wouldn't work...

It's much more likely that they developed together.

As any guitarist will tell you, fingers become calloused from playing the instrument repeatedly. After a while the fingers become calloused. This facilitates the evolution of the skill itself. Rarely does the skill evolve from a genetic mutation. It's typically the opposite.


Did you seriously just use 'how to learn and improve at picking guitar strings' as an explanation for how evolution works? Amazing.
 
2014-04-29 08:00:43 AM
FTA:  The peacock mantis shrimp crushes its prey with punches from two hammer-like front appendages, which strike so fast that they boil the water around them, making the pounding even more severe.

NO!  It does not boil the water, get the facts straight.  It cavitates the water causing air bubbles which induce a shock wave that also assists the attack.
 
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