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(Independent)   UK ad condemning the use of cheap EU labor uses a cheap EU actor   (independent.co.uk) divider line 35
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1046 clicks; posted to Politics » on 26 Apr 2014 at 6:38 PM (18 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-26 05:51:21 PM
The poster appeal features Dave O'Rourke from Dublin as a "British worker"

I know the Irish would bristle at this suggestion, but aren't they technically part of Britain?
 
2014-04-26 06:24:11 PM

fusillade762: The poster appeal features Dave O'Rourke from Dublin as a "British worker"

I know the Irish would bristle at this suggestion, but aren't they technically part of Britain?


Ireland is a sovereign nation that is part of the British Isles.

Different passports, government, head of state.

I'm not sure how that could be construed as "part of Britain", or the UK, which is the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

I'm sure I've read recently about people campaigning to get the name of the British Isles changed to the British and Irish Isles. Given that there are two sovereign states in the archipelago, I don't think anyone should have a problem with that.

Regarding Ukip - they're a bunch of hypocritical bigoted farkwits. Their platform is about immigrants taking British jobs. The party leader, Nigel Farage, employs his German wife as his secretary.

Watch him try and defend this.

And they're constantly kicking racists and sexists out of their party in attempts to make themselves look like a legitimate political party.

It's just a shame that so many Britons sympathise with their views.
 
Boe
2014-04-26 06:50:13 PM

iron de havilland: fusillade762: The poster appeal features Dave O'Rourke from Dublin as a "British worker"

I know the Irish would bristle at this suggestion, but aren't they technically part of Britain?

Ireland is a sovereign nation that is part of the British Isles.

Different passports, government, head of state.

I'm not sure how that could be construed as "part of Britain", or the UK, which is the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

I'm sure I've read recently about people campaigning to get the name of the British Isles changed to the British and Irish Isles. Given that there are two sovereign states in the archipelago, I don't think anyone should have a problem with that.

Regarding Ukip - they're a bunch of hypocritical bigoted farkwits. Their platform is about immigrants taking British jobs. The party leader, Nigel Farage, employs his German wife as his secretary.

Watch him try and defend this.

And they're constantly kicking racists and sexists out of their party in attempts to make themselves look like a legitimate political party.

It's just a shame that so many Britons sympathise with their views.


I saw that clip on "Have I Got News For You".  That clip is a prime example of the kind of journalism we don't see in the U.S. anymore, which is a damn shame.

He struck me as sort of an old, male milquetoast version of Sarah Palin.
 
2014-04-26 06:56:48 PM
Ricardo's law says that things should be made where the labor input is least, so Portugal should make wine and England spin wool. And it's the basis of free trade laws, assuming everyone's labor is the same. But it's not. And getting into the details, beyond labor costing different amounts in different areas, makes my head hurt.
 
2014-04-26 07:09:53 PM
Wasn't the whole point of the EU to exploit cheap labor in Europe?
 
2014-04-26 07:21:24 PM
I can believe two things simultaneously:

1. The surprisingly pro-EU stance of right-thinking people in Ireland is a tacit admission that Irish independence was a mistake. If Mr. O'Rourke isn't British, he ought to be. So there.

(Fun fact: long before the EU was even thought of, it was incredibly easy after 1922 for UK and Irish citizens to live and work in each other's countries. Life went on, and Britain hasn't been saddled with all of Ireland's spongers. Someone should ask Farage about that.)

2. The shiate Farage talked about Putin and Ukraine should have told anyone with his head screwed on right all he needed to know about the Kippers. Farage hates the EU, and wants it gone at any price---including, but not limited to, Russian tanks smashing their way back into Berlin if he can't have his blessed referendum. He can't have it both ways. If Ukraine doesn't get to choose its government, soon neither will Britain. The only reason I could think of that this wouldn't alarm Farage is that he's counting on Russian firepower to bring him to power in London, along with Marine Le Pen in Paris.

On a related note

Ukip member Andre Lampitt, who starred in Wednesday's election broadcast, was suspended from the party after "repellent" posts were found on his Twitter account last night.In the broadcast, Zimbabwe-born Mr Lampitt, who runs a decorating business in Morden, posed in a builder's hard-hat to complain "lads from eastern Europe" were undercutting him.

But in tweets unearthed afterwards, he claimed Ed Miliband was "not British", condemned Islam as "evil", and on Africans, said: "Let them kill themselves off." Today his family said he was dealing with "personal issues".


In this context, of course, "Zimbabwe-born" means "unrepentant Rhodie who blames British bolshies for Mugabe." Probably sees Farage as the re-incarnation of Ian Smith. Tell me your friends...
 
2014-04-26 07:28:12 PM

Boe: iron de havilland: fusillade762: The poster appeal features Dave O'Rourke from Dublin as a "British worker"

I know the Irish would bristle at this suggestion, but aren't they technically part of Britain?

Ireland is a sovereign nation that is part of the British Isles.

Different passports, government, head of state.

I'm not sure how that could be construed as "part of Britain", or the UK, which is the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

I'm sure I've read recently about people campaigning to get the name of the British Isles changed to the British and Irish Isles. Given that there are two sovereign states in the archipelago, I don't think anyone should have a problem with that.

Regarding Ukip - they're a bunch of hypocritical bigoted farkwits. Their platform is about immigrants taking British jobs. The party leader, Nigel Farage, employs his German wife as his secretary.

Watch him try and defend this.

And they're constantly kicking racists and sexists out of their party in attempts to make themselves look like a legitimate political party.

It's just a shame that so many Britons sympathise with their views.

I saw that clip on "Have I Got News For You".  That clip is a prime example of the kind of journalism we don't see in the U.S. anymore, which is a damn shame.


Well, most of the US news I'm exposed to is via fark. And it does depress me when stories are on sites calling themselves "action news".

At least you have Jon Stewart and Colbert satirising those that need it.

He struck me as sort of an old, male milquetoast version of Sarah Palin.

I think it was the previous episode of HIGNFY that had him on the panel. They didn't just stab him in the back, they stabbed him in the front too.

/I thought British Tea Party, myself.
//And super fans of HIGNFY will recognise my reference to Deayton's axing.
 
Boe
2014-04-26 09:13:47 PM

iron de havilland: Boe: iron de havilland: fusillade762: The poster appeal features Dave O'Rourke from Dublin as a "British worker"

I know the Irish would bristle at this suggestion, but aren't they technically part of Britain?

Ireland is a sovereign nation that is part of the British Isles.

Different passports, government, head of state.

I'm not sure how that could be construed as "part of Britain", or the UK, which is the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

I'm sure I've read recently about people campaigning to get the name of the British Isles changed to the British and Irish Isles. Given that there are two sovereign states in the archipelago, I don't think anyone should have a problem with that.

Regarding Ukip - they're a bunch of hypocritical bigoted farkwits. Their platform is about immigrants taking British jobs. The party leader, Nigel Farage, employs his German wife as his secretary.

Watch him try and defend this.

And they're constantly kicking racists and sexists out of their party in attempts to make themselves look like a legitimate political party.

It's just a shame that so many Britons sympathise with their views.

I saw that clip on "Have I Got News For You".  That clip is a prime example of the kind of journalism we don't see in the U.S. anymore, which is a damn shame.

Well, most of the US news I'm exposed to is via fark. And it does depress me when stories are on sites calling themselves "action news".

At least you have Jon Stewart and Colbert satirising those that need it.

He struck me as sort of an old, male milquetoast version of Sarah Palin.

I think it was the previous episode of HIGNFY that had him on the panel. They didn't just stab him in the back, they stabbed him in the front too.

/I thought British Tea Party, myself.
//And super fans of HIGNFY will recognise my reference to Deayton's axing.


Yes, I saw that episode of HIGNFY.  It was refreshingly brutal.

I'm not a super fan as yet.  Just started watching the latest series on the BBC iPlayer.
 
2014-04-26 09:42:12 PM
Here's how it looks like it's going. Peer into Bungles crystal ball!

1) The rise of  Norsefire UKIP has led to a binding commitment vote to stay/leave the EU.
2) The pigheaded attitude of the main three parties to Scottish independence has turned what was a fringe campaign in the background to a very real possibility.
3) 2015, Scotland leaves the UK.
4) 2017, the UK leaves the EU.
5) 2018, Scotland reaffirms its membership of the EU.
6) 2018, huge swaths of London industry relocate to Edinburgh.
7) 2020, the British economy slumps at a rate and scale unprecedented in Western civilisation.
8) 2021, in the chaos, High Chancellor Farage rises as a unity candidate.
9) 2022, the 1812 Overture is added to the Black List.


/ok, maybe not points 8 and 9.
 
2014-04-26 09:42:16 PM

iron de havilland: And they're constantly kicking racists and sexists out of their party in attempts to make themselves look like a legitimate political party.


as opposed to our our reactionaries who double down and accuse their critics of being racist and sexist.
 
2014-04-26 10:10:45 PM

WTF Indeed: Wasn't the whole point of the EU to exploit cheap labor in Europe?


That and cheap oil and steel.
 
2014-04-26 10:36:23 PM
No matter what the media says about UKIP, their stock keeps climbing into the blue. Today's polls give them a 3 point lead over Labour for the May 22 elections. Next year's elections will very likely have UKIP members in Parliament. If Farage runs, he will certainly get in. When Cameron wouldn't debate Farage, he was widely considered a coward. When Clegg debated Farage twice, he got ground into the dust by polls  giving the win to Nigel by 71-29.

Yes, please go on slagging him. He'll have the last laugh, it appears.
 
Boe
2014-04-26 10:49:41 PM

pueblonative: iron de havilland: And they're constantly kicking racists and sexists out of their party in attempts to make themselves look like a legitimate political party.

as opposed to our our reactionaries who double down and accuse their critics of being racist and sexist.


I don't think they are trying to appeal to their base.  They're trying to appeal to people outside their base in order to win over voters.  I know.  It's a novel idea.
 
2014-04-27 12:31:54 AM
Eh, those "EU people" are used in speech or ads because they're white and can therefore be commented on. I do hear Brits complain about Poles, but not nearly as much as the unmentionables.
Besides, Farange is too lovable to disagree with; he's the physical manifestation of Britannia.
img.fark.net
 
2014-04-27 12:39:03 AM

God-is-a-Taco: Eh, those "EU people" are used in speech or ads because they're white and can therefore be commented on. I do hear Brits complain about Poles, but not nearly as much as the unmentionables.
Besides, Farange is too lovable to disagree with; he's the physical manifestation of Britannia.
[img.fark.net image 850x565]


Cute. Would that all his opponents had your kind of wit. But the magazine he's holding has two things Farage never espoused: deporting Muslims and reviving the British Empire. I did like the bit about a UKIP landslide and massive Labour butthurt--if I saw that, I'd grin, too. Is that a real photo, or is that 'shopped?
 
2014-04-27 12:51:07 AM
Why is it that leftists are so quick to denounce neoliberal economists when they suggest cutting taxes and deregulating to improve the economic outlook but the first to embrace their ideas when they say that flooding the country with low-cost labor to keep wages down for employers will have benefits that eventually trickle down to everyone?

It's almost like they have an agenda or something.
 
2014-04-27 12:52:13 AM
Ah, I see, it is shopped. Well done.
 
2014-04-27 05:01:08 AM

GentlemanJ: No matter what the media says about UKIP, their stock keeps climbing into the blue. Today's polls give them a 3 point lead over Labour for the May 22 elections. Next year's elections will very likely have UKIP members in Parliament. If Farage runs, he will certainly get in. When Cameron wouldn't debate Farage, he was widely considered a coward. When Clegg debated Farage twice, he got ground into the dust by polls  giving the win to Nigel by 71-29.

Yes, please go on slagging him. He'll have the last laugh, it appears.


Meh. This is pretty standard dissatisfaction politics. I'd say it's far more to do with not wanting to give any of the main parties a mandate than it is an endorsement of UKip's stance.
 
2014-04-27 08:36:49 AM

GentlemanJ: No matter what the media says about UKIP, their stock keeps climbing into the blue. Today's polls give them a 3 point lead over Labour for the May 22 elections. Next year's elections will very likely have UKIP members in Parliament. If Farage runs, he will certainly get in. When Cameron wouldn't debate Farage, he was widely considered a coward. When Clegg debated Farage twice, he got ground into the dust by polls  giving the win to Nigel by 71-29.

Yes, please go on slagging him. He'll have the last laugh, it appears.


I'd agree with you if we had PR voting. But we don't, mainly because the very same people voting for UKIP voted against it.

UKIP will be very unlikely to have one Member of Parliament, nevermind two or three, nevermind a "voting block". Their support is spread too evenly. It would take a seismic shift in specific parts of the country for them to have more members than even the Greens, and there is zero polling evidence for that.

So UKIP will be a powerful force in the country if you consider the Greens to be a powerful force in the country. With their one MP.
 
2014-04-27 09:26:52 AM

Bungles: GentlemanJ: No matter what the media says about UKIP, their stock keeps climbing into the blue. Today's polls give them a 3 point lead over Labour for the May 22 elections. Next year's elections will very likely have UKIP members in Parliament. If Farage runs, he will certainly get in. When Cameron wouldn't debate Farage, he was widely considered a coward. When Clegg debated Farage twice, he got ground into the dust by polls  giving the win to Nigel by 71-29.

Yes, please go on slagging him. He'll have the last laugh, it appears.

I'd agree with you if we had PR voting. But we don't, mainly because the very same people voting for UKIP voted against it.

UKIP will be very unlikely to have one Member of Parliament, nevermind two or three, nevermind a "voting block". Their support is spread too evenly. It would take a seismic shift in specific parts of the country for them to have more members than even the Greens, and there is zero polling evidence for that.

So UKIP will be a powerful force in the country if you consider the Greens to be a powerful force in the country. With their one MP.


Well, considering that UKIP is now considered a major party, and is topping the polls  for the May 22 elections, I'd say they are growing exponentially, which is far more than the Green Party has ever done.
 
2014-04-27 09:38:33 AM

GentlemanJ: Bungles: GentlemanJ: No matter what the media says about UKIP, their stock keeps climbing into the blue. Today's polls give them a 3 point lead over Labour for the May 22 elections. Next year's elections will very likely have UKIP members in Parliament. If Farage runs, he will certainly get in. When Cameron wouldn't debate Farage, he was widely considered a coward. When Clegg debated Farage twice, he got ground into the dust by polls  giving the win to Nigel by 71-29.

Yes, please go on slagging him. He'll have the last laugh, it appears.

I'd agree with you if we had PR voting. But we don't, mainly because the very same people voting for UKIP voted against it.

UKIP will be very unlikely to have one Member of Parliament, nevermind two or three, nevermind a "voting block". Their support is spread too evenly. It would take a seismic shift in specific parts of the country for them to have more members than even the Greens, and there is zero polling evidence for that.

So UKIP will be a powerful force in the country if you consider the Greens to be a powerful force in the country. With their one MP.

Well, considering that UKIP is now considered a major party, and is topping the polls  for the May 22 elections, I'd say they are growing exponentially, which is far more than the Green Party has ever done.


Again, that would be true if we had PR, and national polls therefore meant something in terms of electing MPs. We don't, and they don't. On a constituency-by-constituency basis, their support is diluted across the country in a way that means virtually zero chance of more than one or two MPs - and only then if Farage runs as an MP in one of them.

The greens have an MP not because they have massive support nationally, but because they have massive support within the bounds of a specific constituency (Brighton and Hove). UKIP will do well in the Euro elections, and I have no doubt they'll get control of a couple of local councils. They won't however - and can't, because of how FPTP elections work - get more and an MP or two. If they get three, that will be a miraculously good result for them, and massively weighted against the maths.

So no, they are not a "major party", any more than Martin Bell (in his white suit) was a "major party" - and he's so far done considerably better than UKIP in national politics. Like an independent candidate, they're one fatal Farage heart attack from vanishing, because their charm and popularity is firmly rooted in one man, and the secondary and tertiary tiers in the party are showing themselves over and over again of being unelectable (I see one wants Dudley-born Lenny Henry to "go home" this morning).
 
2014-04-27 09:55:05 AM

Bungles: GentlemanJ: Bungles: GentlemanJ: No matter what the media says about UKIP, their stock keeps climbing into the blue. Today's polls give them a 3 point lead over Labour for the May 22 elections. Next year's elections will very likely have UKIP members in Parliament. If Farage runs, he will certainly get in. When Cameron wouldn't debate Farage, he was widely considered a coward. When Clegg debated Farage twice, he got ground into the dust by polls  giving the win to Nigel by 71-29.

Yes, please go on slagging him. He'll have the last laugh, it appears.

I'd agree with you if we had PR voting. But we don't, mainly because the very same people voting for UKIP voted against it.

UKIP will be very unlikely to have one Member of Parliament, nevermind two or three, nevermind a "voting block". Their support is spread too evenly. It would take a seismic shift in specific parts of the country for them to have more members than even the Greens, and there is zero polling evidence for that.

So UKIP will be a powerful force in the country if you consider the Greens to be a powerful force in the country. With their one MP.

Well, considering that UKIP is now considered a major party, and is topping the polls  for the May 22 elections, I'd say they are growing exponentially, which is far more than the Green Party has ever done.

Again, that would be true if we had PR, and national polls therefore meant something in terms of electing MPs. We don't, and they don't. On a constituency-by-constituency basis, their support is diluted across the country in a way that means virtually zero chance of more than one or two MPs - and only then if Farage runs as an MP in one of them.

The greens have an MP not because they have massive support nationally, but because they have massive support within the bounds of a specific constituency (Brighton and Hove). UKIP will do well in the Euro elections, and I have no doubt they'll get control of a couple of local councils. They won't however - and can ...


I agree that UKIP members have to step forward and gain their own spotlight. Farage seems like a decent man, charismatic and remarkably lucky, but it can't continue to be a one-man band. They have to mature, come up with a modern program, and otherwise capitalize on their recent successes. In the meantime, is there any way to overcome the FPTP system?
 
2014-04-27 10:07:18 AM

GentlemanJ: In the meantime, is there any way to overcome the FPTP system?


There was! The entire PR and Alternative Vote referendum a couple of years ago was to iron out the system to make it fair - the Greens and the Lib Dems have faced this situation for decades, where their national share of the vote is very significant, but that translates to far, far fewer MPs than that would suggest.

The twist is that the very people who pumped out the propaganda to kibosh that change - the middle and right of the Conservative party - are exactly the demographic who now have become the bulk of UKIP's support. You can take that in one of two ways: either they were incredibly shortsighted and shot themselves in the foot, or that the leadership in the Conservative party was actually incredibly sharp, realising that the traditionally single right voting block was fracturing, and did everything in their power to stop those splinter groups challenging their dominance.

The splintered left has being excellent for the Conservatives for 50 decades - split between Labour, the Lib Dems, and the Greens, FPTP has meant that a country - if you total that left vote - which is between 60%-75% "vaguely on the left" has elected a succession of Conservative governments.


I don't support UKIP or their goals at all, but I think it's absurd that they could get 25%-30% of the general election vote and not get a single MP.
 
2014-04-27 10:21:34 AM

Bungles: GentlemanJ: In the meantime, is there any way to overcome the FPTP system?

There was! The entire PR and Alternative Vote referendum a couple of years ago was to iron out the system to make it fair - the Greens and the Lib Dems have faced this situation for decades, where their national share of the vote is very significant, but that translates to far, far fewer MPs than that would suggest.

The twist is that the very people who pumped out the propaganda to kibosh that change - the middle and right of the Conservative party - are exactly the demographic who now have become the bulk of UKIP's support. You can take that in one of two ways: either they were incredibly shortsighted and shot themselves in the foot, or that the leadership in the Conservative party was actually incredibly sharp, realising that the traditionally single right voting block was fracturing, and did everything in their power to stop those splinter groups challenging their dominance.

The splintered left has being excellent for the Conservatives for 50 decades - split between Labour, the Lib Dems, and the Greens, FPTP has meant that a country - if you total that left vote - which is between 60%-75% "vaguely on the left" has elected a succession of Conservative governments.


I don't support UKIP or their goals at all, but I think it's absurd that they could get 25%-30% of the general election vote and not get a single MP.


I expect that it was the latter--the Tories are canny enough to deny their splinter groups power. Having read the variety of British newspapers and blogs on the rise and rise of UKIP, I came to the conclusion that, so matter what anyone says about them, they will keep gaining popularity. They've obviously tapped into a deep well of anti-Coalition discontent. I think people in the U.K. have had  enough of being told what to do by people who disdain them.
 
2014-04-27 10:25:33 AM

GentlemanJ: Bungles: GentlemanJ: In the meantime, is there any way to overcome the FPTP system?

There was! The entire PR and Alternative Vote referendum a couple of years ago was to iron out the system to make it fair - the Greens and the Lib Dems have faced this situation for decades, where their national share of the vote is very significant, but that translates to far, far fewer MPs than that would suggest.

The twist is that the very people who pumped out the propaganda to kibosh that change - the middle and right of the Conservative party - are exactly the demographic who now have become the bulk of UKIP's support. You can take that in one of two ways: either they were incredibly shortsighted and shot themselves in the foot, or that the leadership in the Conservative party was actually incredibly sharp, realising that the traditionally single right voting block was fracturing, and did everything in their power to stop those splinter groups challenging their dominance.

The splintered left has being excellent for the Conservatives for 50 decades - split between Labour, the Lib Dems, and the Greens, FPTP has meant that a country - if you total that left vote - which is between 60%-75% "vaguely on the left" has elected a succession of Conservative governments.


I don't support UKIP or their goals at all, but I think it's absurd that they could get 25%-30% of the general election vote and not get a single MP.

I expect that it was the latter--the Tories are canny enough to deny their splinter groups power. Having read the variety of British newspapers and blogs on the rise and rise of UKIP, I came to the conclusion that, so matter what anyone says about them, they will keep gaining popularity. They've obviously tapped into a deep well of anti-Coalition discontent. I think people in the U.K. have had  enough of being told what to do by people who disdain them.


I don't disagree, but I don't think UKIP is going to be it, in the long term. There isn't a single member of UKIP outside of Farage who is know at all, outside of those who have had a variety of absurd scandals. It's a castle built on sand.
 
2014-04-27 10:29:46 AM
www.eurweb.com

To paraphrase the above.

UKIP:  Not (officially) racist, but #1 with racisits.
 
2014-04-27 10:39:50 AM

Bungles: GentlemanJ: Bungles: GentlemanJ: In the meantime, is there any way to overcome the FPTP system?

There was! The entire PR and Alternative Vote referendum a couple of years ago was to iron out the system to make it fair - the Greens and the Lib Dems have faced this situation for decades, where their national share of the vote is very significant, but that translates to far, far fewer MPs than that would suggest.

The twist is that the very people who pumped out the propaganda to kibosh that change - the middle and right of the Conservative party - are exactly the demographic who now have become the bulk of UKIP's support. You can take that in one of two ways: either they were incredibly shortsighted and shot themselves in the foot, or that the leadership in the Conservative party was actually incredibly sharp, realising that the traditionally single right voting block was fracturing, and did everything in their power to stop those splinter groups challenging their dominance.

The splintered left has being excellent for the Conservatives for 50 decades - split between Labour, the Lib Dems, and the Greens, FPTP has meant that a country - if you total that left vote - which is between 60%-75% "vaguely on the left" has elected a succession of Conservative governments.


I don't support UKIP or their goals at all, but I think it's absurd that they could get 25%-30% of the general election vote and not get a single MP.

I expect that it was the latter--the Tories are canny enough to deny their splinter groups power. Having read the variety of British newspapers and blogs on the rise and rise of UKIP, I came to the conclusion that, so matter what anyone says about them, they will keep gaining popularity. They've obviously tapped into a deep well of anti-Coalition discontent. I think people in the U.K. have had  enough of being told what to do by people who disdain them.

I don't disagree, but I don't think UKIP is going to be it, in the long term. There isn't a single membe ...


Don't know about that. Paul Nuttall, Farage's deputy, has been pretty visible in the Yorkshire area, and has a potential for wider coverage. Lisa Duffy, the Mayor of Ramsey, is also a potential media focus, as is Diane james, if I'm not mistaken. They just need to be more visible.
 
2014-04-27 11:25:34 AM
Funny, I was just reading about how a UKIP candidate compared Islam to the Third Reich and suggested that a black comedian should move to a "black country" if he was unhappy with the lack of representation for people of colour in the media.

I don't know if I should feel relieved that the US isn't the only place with people that mentally damaged, or sad that other countries have to deal with that level of derpitude as well.
 
2014-04-27 11:29:03 AM

Teufelaffe: Funny, I was just reading about how a UKIP candidate compared Islam to the Third Reich and suggested that a black comedian should move to a "black country" if he was unhappy with the lack of representation for people of colour in the media.

I don't know if I should feel relieved that the US isn't the only place with people that mentally damaged, or sad that other countries have to deal with that level of derpitude as well.


The difference is, UKIP doesn't have a single MP, rather than holding the balls of an entire half of the elected body. Even the Daily Mail mocks them (their readership, however, is fiery supportive in the comments.... very much a Tea Party Frankenstein situation, with the Mail harping on about anti-EU positions for years).
 
2014-04-27 12:05:45 PM

Teufelaffe: Funny, I was just reading about how a UKIP candidate compared Islam to the Third Reich and suggested that a black comedian should move to a "black country" if he was unhappy with the lack of representation for people of colour in the media.

I don't know if I should feel relieved that the US isn't the only place with people that mentally damaged, or sad that other countries have to deal with that level of derpitude as well.


I'd be quite surprised if there weren't people with similar views in every country. As Bungles says, what matters is whether they have the ability to turn their BS into actual laws.
 
2014-04-27 12:33:50 PM

Mayhem_2006: [www.eurweb.com image 624x352]

To paraphrase the above.

UKIP:  Not (officially) racist, but #1 with racisits.


Well #3 with racists (in England anyway), but it is the only one left that is isn't completely socially unacceptable to openly claim to support. Which given what a number of UKIP MPs have been caught saying, may not last a whole lot longer.
 
2014-04-27 12:39:46 PM
UKIP is simply the latest in a long line of far-right parties to try to brand themselves as "Not Racist". In the end they all fail. Even if the leader is smart enough to STFU (which Farage obviously is), but the rest of the party hardly ever have two braincells to rub together.

Sure, they might win the European Parliamentary elections; a low-turnout protest vote that nobody cares about. It will only give their MEPs a bigger opportunity to say stupid shiat in public. After the next general election they will fall back into obscurity.
 
2014-04-27 03:25:58 PM
Can't barrage the Farage.
 
2014-04-27 05:38:02 PM

GentlemanJ: . Is that a real photo, or is that 'shopped?


It's a joke photoshop, man. I mean, I didn't bother to research it but I really don't think it could be real.
 
2014-04-28 05:29:18 AM

God-is-a-Taco: GentlemanJ: . Is that a real photo, or is that 'shopped?

It's a joke photoshop, man. I mean, I didn't bother to research it but I really don't think it could be real.


It's not. I researched it. But "Muslims Deported To France" had me on the floor. I mean, can imagine Marine Le Pen's face? "He did WHAT?!?" She'd have a stroke.
 
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