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(Better Government Association)   Get convicted of taking bribes from the mob in exchange for protecting illegal gaming interests? While a police chief? Not to worry, you can keep your pension. And your spot on the pension board that oversees pension finances   (bettergov.org) divider line 31
    More: Asinine, Stone Park, police chiefs, bribes, pensions, DuPage County, Illinois  
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3699 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Apr 2014 at 6:53 PM (22 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



31 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-04-26 06:28:19 PM
No way!
 
2014-04-26 06:59:28 PM
proving once again...jail is for little people.
 
2014-04-26 07:17:24 PM

some_beer_drinker: proving once again...jail is  laws are for little people.



don't confuse the issue
 
2014-04-26 07:35:36 PM
Is there anyone in Illinois politics who isn't a felon? 4 of the last 7 governors have ended up in prison and a corrupt mayor and police chief drawing a taxpayer funded pension.
www.bettergov.org
No, you're not financially sound. You're in the hole for $100 billion.
 
2014-04-26 07:59:41 PM

dustman81: Is there anyone in Illinois politics who isn't a felon? 4 of the last 7 governors have ended up in prison and a corrupt mayor and police chief drawing a taxpayer funded pension.
[www.bettergov.org image 200x100]
No, you're not financially sound. You're in the hole for $100 billion.


That is strange. I was assured by many progressives that this problem would be fixed when Illinois raised taxes.  Something about it not being a spending problem but a revenue problem.
 
2014-04-26 08:06:16 PM
Cops, is there anything illegal they can't do.
 
2014-04-26 08:09:47 PM
The pension should stay. The spot on the board should go.
 
2014-04-26 08:21:40 PM

Smackledorfer: The pension should stay. The spot on the board should go.


Why should he keep his pension when they were committing crimes while wearing the badge? State law seems pretty clear on that.
 
2014-04-26 08:26:51 PM

Whatchoo Talkinbout: Cops, is there anything illegal they can't do.


This. I will never trust a cop. Dirty bastards.
 
2014-04-26 08:31:01 PM

Whatchoo Talkinbout: Cops, is there anything illegal they can't do.


Rat out another cop. They just get shot for rhat, though.
 
2014-04-26 08:32:03 PM

listernine: Whatchoo Talkinbout: Cops, is there anything illegal they can't do.

Rat out another cop. They just get shot for rhat, though.


*that. But the misspelling is oddly appropriate. Ftfm
 
2014-04-26 08:51:36 PM

hasty ambush: dustman81: Is there anyone in Illinois politics who isn't a felon? 4 of the last 7 governors have ended up in prison and a corrupt mayor and police chief drawing a taxpayer funded pension.
[www.bettergov.org image 200x100]
No, you're not financially sound. You're in the hole for $100 billion.

That is strange. I was assured by many progressives that this problem would be fixed when Illinois raised taxes.  Something about it not being a spending problem but a revenue problem.


Oh yes, lowering taxes will prevent corruption and incompetence in the police force, Dorothy.

Not to mention that the corrupt pieces of shiat involved are mostly Republicans.
 
2014-04-26 09:00:31 PM

Smackledorfer: The pension should stay. The spot on the board should go.


Absolutely not, especially considering that this is in regards to official misconduct.  He shouldn't get a dime, and he should still be in prison.  If you do something illegal on the clock as a public employee, or related to your duties/powers, your pension should be gone.  If you do something stupid and off the clock like DUI or fraud, you should keep your pension, minus whatever the civil judgement is against you.
 
2014-04-26 09:11:33 PM

redmid17: Smackledorfer: The pension should stay. The spot on the board should go.

Why should he keep his pension when they were committing crimes while wearing the badge? State law seems pretty clear on that.


He didn't commit a crime remember that money is speech so there was no bribery just exchange of protected speech

Thanks Supreme court
 
2014-04-26 09:47:47 PM

Fark It: If you do something illegal on the clock as a public employee, or related to your duties/powers, your pension should be gone.


A private employee would never lose vested pension funds, even if they were fired for crimes on the clock.  I don't think working in the public sector really warrants a separate rule of law.
 
2014-04-26 09:50:35 PM

dustman81: Is there anyone in Illinois politics who isn't a felon? 4 of the last 7 governors have ended up in prison and a corrupt mayor and police chief drawing a taxpayer funded pension.


You actually need to go back nine governors to get four prisoners.  Not that I blame you, it's easy to forget that Jim Edgar didn't ever actually get charged.

[www.bettergov.org image 200x100]
No, you're not financially sound. You're in the hole for $100 billion.


Our hero is apparently being paid from a local pension fund, which might very well be in the black.  And he isn't even getting that much money out of it, although the story doesn't say how much he's getting paid for his service on the pension board.

However, I'd point out that a civilian who went to prison would have his retirement savings seized by the government, and would most likely forfeit his Social Security as well, so this is yet another example of different laws for made men and little people.
 
2014-04-26 09:58:54 PM

Sum Dum Gai: A private employee would never lose vested pension funds, even if they were fired for crimes on the clock.  I don't think working in the public sector really warrants a separate rule of law.


Generally speaking, private employees don't get pensions any more, but I'm not convinced that's true.

It is certainly possible/likely for private employees to lose 401(k) vesting when they're fired.  The law only allows for forfeiture of matching contributions, but I've heard of situations where the employer took everything.

Also, you lose your Social Security benefits if you serve time.  It's possible to get them back if you convince the government you've been 'rehabilitated,' but I can't find any statistics on how often that actually happens.
 
2014-04-26 10:09:31 PM

fnordfocus: Generally speaking, private employees don't get pensions any more, but I'm not convinced that's true.

It is certainly possible/likely for private employees to lose 401(k) vesting when they're fired.  The law only allows for forfeiture of matching contributions, but I've heard of situations where the employer took everything.

Also, you lose your Social Security benefits if you serve time.  It's possible to get them back if you convince the government you've been 'rehabilitated,' but I can't find any statistics on how often that actually happens.


The employer can only take unvested contributions.  ERISA, which applies to almost all private sector retirement funds, guarantees that, as well as setting limits on how long the company is allowed to make you wait to be vested.  Once a contribution is vested, it is fully the legal property of the recipient; the employer can no more take it back than they can take back your pay checks.  Like other property of a convicted criminal, of course, it could be used to pay fines / judgments.

Also, you do NOT lose Social Security just for being a convicted felon.  You do not get SS checks while incarcerated, or while fleeing incarceration, but once released, you will begin collecting SS again.
 
2014-04-26 10:50:20 PM
Instinctively knew this was going to my state of birth when I clicked.

/ Let me sing you the song of my people.
 
2014-04-26 10:57:20 PM

Sum Dum Gai: The employer can only take unvested contributions.  ERISA, which applies to almost all private sector retirement funds, guarantees that, as well as setting limits on how long the company is allowed to make you wait to be vested.  Once a contribution is vested, it is fully the legal property of the recipient; the employer can no more take it back than they can take back your pay checks.  Like other property of a convicted criminal, of course, it could be used to pay fines / judgments.


That's pretty much what I've said, but I've heard of employers seizing even employer contributions when they got mad about something like someone quitting without notice.

Regardless, prisoners aren't allowed to have bank accounts, so won't the government just seize everything when you go to prison?
 
2014-04-26 11:19:56 PM

Sum Dum Gai: Also, you do NOT lose Social Security just for being a convicted felon.  You do not get SS checks while incarcerated, or while fleeing incarceration, but once released, you will begin collecting SS again.


A huge portion of prisoners were convicted of drug-related offenses.

You might check out 42 U.S.C. §1320a-7 which denies Medicare to anyone with a felony drug conviction (and probably also a misdemeanor).

Also, according to this government document, "People convicted of a felony for possession or sell of controlled substance losses their ability to obtain food stamps and social security benefits."
 
2014-04-26 11:59:41 PM
Of course, technically King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia currently owns about 30 trillion dollars worth of oil... so... theres that.
 
2014-04-27 12:00:53 AM

Alonjar: Of course, technically King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia currently owns about 30 trillion dollars worth of oil... so... theres that.


god damnit, wrong thread.
 
2014-04-27 12:39:17 AM
Wow on the mob connections and selling cocaine and yet still allowed to be on a pension board.  I take away from this that this town is still a mob run town and the fact the pension is underfunded is probably mob related.  I would also investigate every rubbish collection (toxic waste disposal) company in the area, sounds like the whole place stinks.  Though I imagine the illegal gambling venues are now legal gambling venues owned by the same people (cept now they have to pay tax on the profits they declare LOL ;)
 
2014-04-27 12:41:16 AM

Alonjar: Alonjar: Of course, technically King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia currently owns about 30 trillion dollars worth of oil... so... theres that.

god damnit, wrong thread.


Not really. This is mob based thread.  The Arabs just do it way better than the Italians.
 
2014-04-27 02:35:37 AM
Bill? I'm looking for a "Bill", are there any "Bills" around here?
 
2014-04-27 03:15:42 AM

bingethinker: hasty ambush: dustman81: Is there anyone in Illinois politics who isn't a felon? 4 of the last 7 governors have ended up in prison and a corrupt mayor and police chief drawing a taxpayer funded pension.
[www.bettergov.org image 200x100]
No, you're not financially sound. You're in the hole for $100 billion.

That is strange. I was assured by many progressives that this problem would be fixed when Illinois raised taxes.  Something about it not being a spending problem but a revenue problem.

Oh yes, lowering taxes will prevent corruption and incompetence in the police force, Dorothy.

Not to mention that the corrupt pieces of shiat involved are mostly Republicans.


::eye roll::

Can you both stfu about this being a democrat vs republican problem already?? This is a politician problem in that they're ALL farking corrupt -- cops, too. Any taste of power must make their moral compass go all wonky.
 
2014-04-27 03:17:01 AM
Something something smaller governments are harder to corrupt, something something.
 
2014-04-27 04:57:15 AM
"I resigned before I was ever found guilty," Testa said in a brief phone interview. "It's a thing in the past I don't even want to remember."

First off, yeah buddy I bet you don't.  Second, not being a lawyer I don't know how it works.  So you're convicted of acts that you performed, while in office.  Eventually you were found guilty.  So should it matter when he was found guilty rather than the demonstrated fact of his guilt?  Especially as related to his resignation.  I know there are some lawyers here.  Any of you want to help explain this?
 
2014-04-27 09:48:11 AM

a flying monkey made me do it: "I resigned before I was ever found guilty," Testa said in a brief phone interview. "It's a thing in the past I don't even want to remember."

First off, yeah buddy I bet you don't.  Second, not being a lawyer I don't know how it works.  So you're convicted of acts that you performed, while in office.  Eventually you were found guilty.  So should it matter when he was found guilty rather than the demonstrated fact of his guilt?  Especially as related to his resignation.  I know there are some lawyers here.  Any of you want to help explain this?


I wouldnt worry too much.  If a US citizen murders someone, then renounces his citizenship and flees to Canada before being implicated, it's not as though US authorities would simply say, "Oh, that was clever!  Guess our hands are tied lulz!"

I could be wrong... IANAL
 
2014-04-27 09:55:43 AM
Stone Park is the farking worst. Avoid it at all cost. Take any asshole cop and multiply his asshole-ness by 10,000 and you have every Stone Park cop. That place needs to be nuked off the face of the planet.
 
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