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(Sun Sentinel)   Who foots the bill when your neighbor's liquefied remains seep into your wall? Apparently not your insurance company   (sun-sentinel.com) divider line 32
    More: Florida, State Farm, seep, needs, appeal court, condos, corpses, walls, trial courts  
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7728 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Apr 2014 at 1:20 PM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



32 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-04-25 01:24:08 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-04-25 01:24:15 PM  
"State Farm disagreed that a decomposing body constituted an explosion."

In short, this woman is a dunce and we're all stupider for looking at this article.
 
2014-04-25 01:24:32 PM  
Do insurance companies cover bullet hole damage? Go the Make My Day route and shoot that trespassing sumbiatch. Uh. With a flamethrower.
 
2014-04-25 01:27:10 PM  
Apparently the policy at hand only covered damage to personal property (not the condo itself) if it was caused by a specific "named peril", one of which was an explosion.  So, the policy owner tried to get the courts to say a body decomposing was an explosion (based on medical terminology that adecomposing body's cells "explosively expand").  The appeals court didn't buy it.

Fun case, though.
 
2014-04-25 01:28:29 PM  
Mmmm, maybe I shouldn't have read the article while eating lunch?
 
2014-04-25 01:31:54 PM  
Heh...gross.

/did the dead person shoot around the room like a baloon loosing all it's air

/PBBBBBTTsplat
 
2014-04-25 01:35:56 PM  
(Hums the theme from Bones.)
 
2014-04-25 01:49:51 PM  
The owner cheaped out with their insurance. No surprise it didn't pay off.
 
2014-04-25 01:50:30 PM  

AirForceVet: Mmmm, maybe I shouldn't have read the article while eating lunch?


Not a zombie, huh?
 
2014-04-25 01:50:33 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2014-04-25 01:51:05 PM  
I feel bad for getting so many giggles out of this article.
 
2014-04-25 01:53:39 PM  

agitated chicken: I feel bad for getting so many giggles out of this article.


Why don't I get cases like this when I have jury duty?
 
2014-04-25 01:59:13 PM  
Ick.  At the very least they should help with the clean up, this is a serious health hazard.
 
2014-04-25 02:01:30 PM  

Geotpf: Apparently the policy at hand only covered damage to personal property (not the condo itself) if it was caused by a specific "named peril", one of which was an explosion.  So, the policy owner tried to get the courts to say a body decomposing was an explosion (based on medical terminology that adecomposing body's cells "explosively expand").  The appeals court didn't buy it.

Fun case, though.


I could go for a little bit of peril.
 
2014-04-25 02:10:16 PM  
Oh come on Subby, low hanging fruit here

"Like a dead, decomposing, liquified neighbor, State Farm is there(or not)"
 
2014-04-25 02:13:57 PM  
Despite Rodrigo's efforts, the appeal court sided with State Farm, but not before noting the unusual nature of the case.

"Ladies and gentlemen of the jury:  In the matter of Rodrigo vs. State Farm, how do you find?"

"BRAINS!"

Her attorneys should have been more selective during voir dire.
 
2014-04-25 02:14:07 PM  
If you want an all risks policy, pay for an all risks policy.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-04-25 02:25:06 PM  
She also lost by not filing the proper paperwork, a sworn proof of loss, but the court added the explosion analysis to make sure. (decision (PDF))
 
2014-04-25 02:27:54 PM  
And people said I was being creepy, when I had Decomposing Body to my house Insurance.
 
2014-04-25 02:34:59 PM  
A Jewish lightning strike will take care of this.
 
2014-04-25 02:54:12 PM  
My experience with home insurance companies is that they don't cover  anything outside of "has your house burned down?" or "has a car hit your house?"
 
2014-04-25 02:58:52 PM  
My understanding in an event like this is that State Farm is both there and not there until the dead guy's apartment is actually opened up.
 
2014-04-25 03:42:10 PM  

Xaxor: Ick.  At the very least they should help with the clean up, this is a serious health hazard.


Not really. I mean you don't want to ingest a dead body or it's fluids, but it is pretty inert stuff. Dieases die off when you die, viruses have lost their host to keep going. Unless she was radioactive or full of arsenic, her goop was relatively benign. Stinky, but benign.
 
2014-04-25 03:51:02 PM  

coroner74: Xaxor: Ick.  At the very least they should help with the clean up, this is a serious health hazard.

Not really. I mean you don't want to ingest a dead body or it's fluids, but it is pretty inert stuff. Dieases die off when you die, viruses have lost their host to keep going. Unless she was radioactive or full of arsenic, her goop was relatively benign. Stinky, but benign.


You have obviously never had to clean up after a dead body.

First of all it stinks. There is something in the human programming that twigs out on the smell of death.

The stink gets everywhere.

The stink is a biohazard and will make you pretty sick if exposed to it long enough. (Been there. Done that.)

The human body is basically a bag of goo kept stable by a meat sack. When you die, the whole thing falls apart pretty fast. Even worse when it is a hot day and they don't find the body for a few days.

//My best frined died last July. They did not find him for three days. I had to clean up. NOT fun.
 
2014-04-25 04:35:58 PM  

BlackArt: coroner74: Xaxor: Ick.  At the very least they should help with the clean up, this is a serious health hazard.

Not really. I mean you don't want to ingest a dead body or it's fluids, but it is pretty inert stuff. Dieases die off when you die, viruses have lost their host to keep going. Unless she was radioactive or full of arsenic, her goop was relatively benign. Stinky, but benign.

You have obviously never had to clean up after a dead body.

First of all it stinks. There is something in the human programming that twigs out on the smell of death.

The stink gets everywhere.

The stink is a biohazard and will make you pretty sick if exposed to it long enough. (Been there. Done that.)

The human body is basically a bag of goo kept stable by a meat sack. When you die, the whole thing falls apart pretty fast. Even worse when it is a hot day and they don't find the body for a few days.

//My best frined died last July. They did not find him for three days. I had to clean up. NOT fun.


You had to clean up the remains of your best friend?  That is not cool.
 
2014-04-25 04:50:10 PM  
Well the condo should have a master policy to cover stuff like this. Just last fall my upstairs neighbor was leaking into my roomates room. Took my lame ass roomate a couple months to notice the big brown spot getting bigger on the ceiling. But I reported it to the neighbor and the condo, 2 weeks later boom fixed and didnt cost me a cent.
 
2014-04-25 05:04:07 PM  
This is why you should consider flood insurance even if you don't live in a floodplain.
 
2014-04-25 05:04:45 PM  

Primitive Screwhead: Geotpf: Apparently the policy at hand only covered damage to personal property (not the condo itself) if it was caused by a specific "named peril", one of which was an explosion.  So, the policy owner tried to get the courts to say a body decomposing was an explosion (based on medical terminology that adecomposing body's cells "explosively expand").  The appeals court didn't buy it.

Fun case, though.

I could go for a little bit of peril.


No, it's too perilous
 
2014-04-25 05:39:05 PM  
Rather than explosion, I'd have gone with home invasion.
 
2014-04-25 05:44:05 PM  

Loaf's Tray: My understanding in an event like this is that State Farm is both there and not there until the dead guy's apartment is actually opened up.


Schroedinger's coverage?
 
2014-04-25 06:01:28 PM  

coroner74: Not really. I mean you don't want to ingest a dead body or it's fluids, but it is pretty inert stuff. Dieases die off when you die, viruses have lost their host to keep going. Unless she was radioactive or full of arsenic, her goop was relatively benign. Stinky, but benign.


That depends on the virus.  One that remains infectious in the environment remains infectious in a dead body.  These are normally minor things, though--things which are serious and persist in the environment are devastating--thus we have developed vaccines and it's very unlikely the person had them before they died.

Geotpf: Apparently the policy at hand only covered damage to personal property (not the condo itself) if it was caused by a specific "named peril", one of which was an explosion. So, the policy owner tried to get the courts to say a body decomposing was an explosion (based on medical terminology that adecomposing body's cells "explosively expand"). The appeals court didn't buy it.


Exactly.  She took the cheap version of the insurance, the oddball peril wasn't covered, she tried to get it covered anyway.
 
2014-04-25 06:44:06 PM  

Maneck: If you want an all risks policy, pay for an all risks policy.


Different condo associations have different rules as to where the unit holder's responsibility begins.  Some only make you protect your belongings to having you essentially take care of everything but the siding and/or exterior glass.  So she probably got the proper coverage; it's just not State Farm's cost.

/I said unit holder...
 
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