If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(International Business Times)   Krypton is used to date Antarctic ice, tell scientists whether it is from Before Rao or After Zod   (ibtimes.com) divider line 7
    More: Interesting, Antarctica, Antarctic ice, scientists, kryptons, noble gases, asymptotic analysis, carbon datings, atmospheric carbon dioxide  
•       •       •

508 clicks; posted to Geek » on 23 Apr 2014 at 3:31 PM (34 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



7 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-04-23 10:00:36 AM  
"Well the good news is that we have some really accurate readings with this stuff."

"And the bad news?"

"We lost a bit of the Krypton during our process and...well...there's some sort of Crystal City now."

thetalkingpot.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-04-23 04:12:35 PM  
I will find it!!!!

img.fark.net
 
2014-04-23 04:47:31 PM  
Krypton dating seems like it would be really hard to do.
 
2014-04-23 05:58:55 PM  
bdub77:

there's some sort of Crystal City now

I wonder if Alvin Maker is around
 
2014-04-23 06:10:47 PM  
Kudos, subby, for the Rao reference.
 
2014-04-23 08:32:16 PM  
But unlike carbon-14 dating, krypton is a noble gas that is stable and has a half-life of about 230,000 years.

Isotopes that are stable don't have half-lives.  That's kinda the point.  Either they're confusing chemically inert with radiologically stable, or the person they interviewed said stabler, (meaning 81Kr has a long half-live than 14C and therefore can be used to date things further back) but didn't say it very clearly.

/crap like this is why I've decided to go into science communication
 
2014-04-24 03:45:00 AM  

Bondith: But unlike carbon-14 dating, krypton is a noble gas that is stable and has a half-life of about 230,000 years.

Isotopes that are stable don't have half-lives.  That's kinda the point.  Either they're confusing chemically inert with radiologically stable, or the person they interviewed said stabler, (meaning 81Kr has a long half-live than 14C and therefore can be used to date things further back) but didn't say it very clearly.

/crap like this is why I've decided to go into science communication


Um, everything has a half-life ;)

But you're right that it's mostly used for unstable isotopes.
 
Displayed 7 of 7 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report