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(KVUE Austin)   A woman cleaning out her desk at Goodnight Middle School found a photo of a World War II soldier. Since then she has passed the photo around to veterans groups, trying to find out who the man is so they can return it to its rightful owner   (kvue.com) divider line 42
    More: Spiffy, Goodnight Middle School, World War II, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Hoping  
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5168 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Apr 2014 at 6:01 PM (26 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



42 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-04-21 04:30:37 PM  
 
2014-04-21 06:04:30 PM  
1.bp.blogspot.com

Also...

simpsonswiki.com
 
2014-04-21 06:11:50 PM  
Too bad it's John Wayne Gacy.
 
2014-04-21 06:17:50 PM  
She's been getting passed around veterans' groups?
 
2014-04-21 06:21:36 PM  

boyvoyeur: Too bad it's John Wayne Gacy.


Say Goodnight, Gacy.
 
2014-04-21 06:28:12 PM  
When did people stop contacting other people and start reaching out to them instead?
 
2014-04-21 06:28:16 PM  

boyvoyeur: Too bad it's John Wayne Gacy.


That clown?
 
2014-04-21 06:30:19 PM  
Why not just see who taught in that classroom beforehand.. And start from there? WW2 people are old.. Bucky Barnes didn't recognize Steve Rodgers after all this time.
 
2014-04-21 06:33:36 PM  
If you have kids, let them shake the hand of a WW2 veteran, maybe hear the veteran's story.

/I met a Civil War vet
//yes, I am older than dirt and sentimental, too
///good memories are priceless
 
2014-04-21 06:36:07 PM  
Goodnight?

www.highdefdigest.com
 
2014-04-21 06:39:41 PM  
wag, but I'd wager it belongs to the student you stole it from bit*ch.
 
2014-04-21 06:40:30 PM  

orbister: When did people stop contacting other people and start reaching out to them instead?


www.dailyhaha.com
 
2014-04-21 06:45:02 PM  
damn dust
 
2014-04-21 06:46:32 PM  

Danger Avoid Death: orbister: When did people stop contacting other people and start reaching out to them instead?

[www.dailyhaha.com image 500x808]


Somebody get that boy a sammich and a barbell, stat.

/also, gross
 
2014-04-21 06:49:16 PM  
Good uplifting story. I'm always a little sad when I see family photos in antique stores. I found a 1920 Manual for Courts Martial in an antique store in Montgomery AL. I was able to ascertain that the guy whose name was written on the book in several places, Early EW Duncan, went on to be Commander of the Iceland Command during WWII (and I have to wonder who he ticked off to get that duty). I did some cursory research with the intent of finding his family, and didn't have much luck. I suppose I could try harder.
 
2014-04-21 06:49:51 PM  
My grandfather served in the military (Navy) for over 40 years - he was one of the first E9's (Master Chief Petty Officer)

He was also a photographer, and I have a crate full of old slides from the 1940's and 1950's of his, including his logbook from serving on the USS Pennsylvania which is full of photos of his shipmates.

I've always wondered if there was some sort of national organization that collects or helps distribute these sorts of images to family descendants. I know that there are dozens, if not hundreds, of photos of servicemen that their descendants have never seen.

I know I'd love to see old photos of my ancestors if someone else had them..

Anyone have any suggestions? I

hundreds and hundreds of old slides of just post-WWII Japan, Philippines, Hong Kong, San Fran, Hawaii, etc....Ive only started to scan some in.

img.fark.net
img.fark.net

img.fark.net

img.fark.net
 
2014-04-21 06:51:04 PM  
Who is this mystery WWII soldier?

encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com
 
2014-04-21 06:51:51 PM  

Cletus C.: Who is this mystery WWII soldier?


Major Perv.
 
2014-04-21 06:53:42 PM  

ISO15693: My grandfather served in the military (Navy) for over 40 years - he was one of the first E9's (Master Chief Petty Officer)

He was also a photographer, and I have a crate full of old slides from the 1940's and 1950's of his, including his logbook from serving on the USS Pennsylvania which is full of photos of his shipmates.

I've always wondered if there was some sort of national organization that collects or helps distribute these sorts of images to family descendants. I know that there are dozens, if not hundreds, of photos of servicemen that their descendants have never seen.

I know I'd love to see old photos of my ancestors if someone else had them..

Anyone have any suggestions? I

hundreds and hundreds of old slides of just post-WWII Japan, Philippines, Hong Kong, San Fran, Hawaii, etc....Ive only started to scan some in.


Naval History and Heritage Command might be a good place to start. Do you know his unit of assignment?

http://www.history.navy.mil
 
2014-04-21 06:54:46 PM  
Awesome pics, ISO15693.
 
Skr
2014-04-21 06:56:24 PM  

Danger Avoid Death: orbister: When did people stop contacting other people and start reaching out to them instead?

[www.dailyhaha.com image 500x808]


Poor David Tennant has fallen on hard times after his Who stint.
 
2014-04-21 06:57:49 PM  
"Run, Smitty!  The kid from that one night stand is here!!"

*sounds of a walker clattering out the back door*
 
2014-04-21 07:08:46 PM  

Skr: Danger Avoid Death: orbister: When did people stop contacting other people and start reaching out to them instead?

[www.dailyhaha.com image 500x808]

Poor David Tennant has fallen on hard times after his Who stint.


*scrolls back up*  Oh god, now I can't unsee it.
 
2014-04-21 07:21:19 PM  
Have we reached peak soldier worship yet.

/go ahead and let me have it
//dad was a ww2 vet
/// he'd have said, 'She found a fifty something year old picture with no name on it and she's doing what now? Why would you do that.'
 
2014-04-21 07:33:46 PM  

orbister: When did people stop contacting other people and start reaching out to them instead?


Probably around the same time that going about your life became "an emotional journey" and every time someone who's not a criminal dies it all of a sudden gets really dusty.
 
2014-04-21 07:40:52 PM  
She's working on returning...a photo...to its rightful owner. I gotta be honest, this sounds like a waste of time. If you find the soldier's remains, then yeah, definitely. His purple heart? Maybe. A leather jacket you found along the freeway? No. A photo? Get real, you need a (better) hobby.

JohnBigBootay: Have we reached peak soldier worship yet.


No. A while ago, Korn's guitarist James "Munky" Schaffer was giving away one of his 7-string guitars. Sure enough, someone popped up to suggest it should be given to a veteran, because eagles and such like. Yo, you kidding? That axe should go to an up-and-coming professional guitarist, or at the very least someone who can actually play it.

/Support the troops! Don't deploy them without a damn good reason.
 
2014-04-21 07:41:46 PM  

freetomato: Good uplifting story. I'm always a little sad when I see family photos in antique stores. I found a 1920 Manual for Courts Martial in an antique store in Montgomery AL. I was able to ascertain that the guy whose name was written on the book in several places, Early EW Duncan, went on to be Commander of the Iceland Command during WWII (and I have to wonder who he ticked off to get that duty). I did some cursory research with the intent of finding his family, and didn't have much luck. I suppose I could try harder.


I have been doing genealogy for about 15 years. I was lucky enough to find photos of my great great grandparents on findagrave. I contacted the man who posted them to see if he had any more. He told me he and his wife buy old photos if they have info on them and try to find the families they belong to. He was kind enough to send the originals to me and I have since started doing the same thing. To anyone doing family research these are priceless. I'm really cynical about a lot of things, but stories like this make me smile.
 
2014-04-21 07:54:11 PM  

ISO15693: My grandfather served in the military (Navy) for over 40 years - he was one of the first E9's (Master Chief Petty Officer)

He was also a photographer, and I have a crate full of old slides from the 1940's and 1950's of his, including his logbook from serving on the USS Pennsylvania which is full of photos of his shipmates.

Anyone have any suggestions?...hundreds and hundreds of old slides of just post-WWII Japan, Philippines, Hong Kong, San Fran, Hawaii, etc....Ive only started to scan some in.


Let me get your frequency straight.  You're in close proximity of all these photos, and you don't have the amplitude to take it farther?  ISO15693, that doesn't sound right.
My advice to you is to scan the best of these, and relevant sections of the logbook, put them into a nice format in a PDF, and then self-publish them as a gift for your family.  It's not real expensive, and it's a unique and personal view of a time in history that your descendants will have for a long time.  From the small sample you've posted here, they're great photos.  If you do find a WW2 photo archive, all the better.  Talk to your local or state archives, they'll know what to do with them.
 
2014-04-21 07:57:55 PM  

Cletus C.: Who is this mystery WWII soldier?

[encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com image 194x259]


Not necessarily a cool story, but as a child I learned the word "bludgeon" from the news reports about Crane's death.
 
2014-04-21 08:03:39 PM  

Colour_out_of_Space: Cletus C.: Who is this mystery WWII soldier?

[encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com image 194x259]

Not necessarily a cool story, but as a child I learned the word "bludgeon" from the news reports about Crane's death.


Cool. Likewise, as a kid, that's how I learned the term "videotaped orgy".
 
2014-04-21 08:13:30 PM  
It's very sad that a "longtime teacher" at a school had not one person at that school able to identify him.  Thank goodness his students did.  Everyone wants to believe they left an impression on someone.  It's sad to know that for the most part, nope.
 
2014-04-21 08:38:57 PM  

ISO15693: My grandfather served in the military (Navy) for over 40 years - he was one of the first E9's (Master Chief Petty Officer)

He was also a photographer, and I have a crate full of old slides from the 1940's and 1950's of his, including his logbook from serving on the USS Pennsylvania which is full of photos of his shipmates.

I've always wondered if there was some sort of national organization that collects or helps distribute these sorts of images to family descendants. I know that there are dozens, if not hundreds, of photos of servicemen that their descendants have never seen.

I know I'd love to see old photos of my ancestors if someone else had them..

Anyone have any suggestions? I

hundreds and hundreds of old slides of just post-WWII Japan, Philippines, Hong Kong, San Fran, Hawaii, etc....Ive only started to scan some in.

[img.fark.net image 850x598]
[img.fark.net image 850x595]

[img.fark.net image 850x601]

[img.fark.net image 850x594]


You need to get these online someplace that can watermark and price them. These are beyond snapshots taken with a cheap camera. Your grandfather was a photographer - this is work he never got around to getting paid for. You can always link to the site for people to view.
 
2014-04-21 09:17:00 PM  
ISO15693:
I know I'd love to see old photos of my ancestors if someone else had them..

Anyone have any suggestions? I

hundreds and hundreds of old slides of just post-WWII Japan, Philippines, Hong Kong, San Fran, Hawaii, etc....Ive only started to scan some in.


Wow, Skyraiders and Bearcats. Would have loved to hear that!
 
2014-04-21 10:07:50 PM  
Is that the hulk of the USS  Utahin the background?
 
2014-04-21 10:30:17 PM  

freetomato: Cletus C.: Who is this mystery WWII soldier?

Major Perv.


Colonel Perv, actually
 
2014-04-21 10:37:55 PM  

ISO15693: My grandfather served in the military (Navy) for over 40 years - he was one of the first E9's (Master Chief Petty Officer)

He was also a photographer, and I have a crate full of old slides from the 1940's and 1950's of his, including his logbook from serving on the USS Pennsylvania which is full of photos of his shipmates.

I've always wondered if there was some sort of national organization that collects or helps distribute these sorts of images to family descendants. I know that there are dozens, if not hundreds, of photos of servicemen that their descendants have never seen.

I know I'd love to see old photos of my ancestors if someone else had them..

Anyone have any suggestions? I

hundreds and hundreds of old slides of just post-WWII Japan, Philippines, Hong Kong, San Fran, Hawaii, etc....Ive only started to scan some in.


I suspect there are many people out there with the same challenge. My grandfather was an army medic in the pacific theater for 4 years.  He took a camera along even though it wasn't allowed.  We have many photos that my family shares, but that belong to others. Some of soldiers at leisure, some gruesome of fallen Japanese. Only a few of my grandfather himself as he was usually behind the lens but I truly cherish those.  I have not found an archive who has the means to accept them and figure out what to do with them.
Take this one for instance. I've searched for hours trying to find out anything about this one to no avail and I have a name, date of birth and date of death and still can't place it. I'm sure it would mean a lot to someone.

i59.tinypic.com
 
2014-04-21 10:50:17 PM  

bugcrusher: ISO15693: My grandfather served in the military (Navy) for over 40 years - he was one of the first E9's (Master Chief Petty Officer)

He was also a photographer, and I have a crate full of old slides from the 1940's and 1950's of his, including his logbook from serving on the USS Pennsylvania which is full of photos of his shipmates.

Anyone have any suggestions?...hundreds and hundreds of old slides of just post-WWII Japan, Philippines, Hong Kong, San Fran, Hawaii, etc....Ive only started to scan some in.

Let me get your frequency straight.  You're in close proximity of all these photos, and you don't have the amplitude to take it farther?  ISO15693, that doesn't sound right.
My advice to you is to scan the best of these, and relevant sections of the logbook, put them into a nice format in a PDF, and then self-publish them as a gift for your family.  It's not real expensive, and it's a unique and personal view of a time in history that your descendants will have for a long time.  From the small sample you've posted here, they're great photos.  If you do find a WW2 photo archive, all the better.  Talk to your local or state archives, they'll know what to do with them.


This. A couple of years ago I went to my dad's house and gathered every document and picture I could find. Shoe boxes full of pics, pics off the refrigerator, stuffed in drawers, report cards from when we were in elementary school, dad's pics from high school as well as his time served during the Korean War - basically everything that could be scanned. I spent 3 months scanning everything. Over 3000 pics and docs. Burned the images to cd's and gave them to my brothers, sisters and nieces and nephews as Christmas gifts.
 
2014-04-22 12:40:24 AM  
It would have been smarter to look into who had used that desk in the past instead of asking random veterans.
 
2014-04-22 01:07:13 AM  
Well, now I know how I'm going to end up. All that's left to do is get a teaching gig.
 
2014-04-22 02:41:39 AM  

CaptSS: bugcrusher: ISO15693: My grandfather served in the military (Navy) for over 40 years - he was one of the first E9's (Master Chief Petty Officer)

He was also a photographer, and I have a crate full of old slides from the 1940's and 1950's of his, including his logbook from serving on the USS Pennsylvania which is full of photos of his shipmates.

Anyone have any suggestions?...hundreds and hundreds of old slides of just post-WWII Japan, Philippines, Hong Kong, San Fran, Hawaii, etc....Ive only started to scan some in.

Let me get your frequency straight.  You're in close proximity of all these photos, and you don't have the amplitude to take it farther?  ISO15693, that doesn't sound right.
My advice to you is to scan the best of these, and relevant sections of the logbook, put them into a nice format in a PDF, and then self-publish them as a gift for your family.  It's not real expensive, and it's a unique and personal view of a time in history that your descendants will have for a long time.  From the small sample you've posted here, they're great photos.  If you do find a WW2 photo archive, all the better.  Talk to your local or state archives, they'll know what to do with them.

This. A couple of years ago I went to my dad's house and gathered every document and picture I could find. Shoe boxes full of pics, pics off the refrigerator, stuffed in drawers, report cards from when we were in elementary school, dad's pics from high school as well as his time served during the Korean War - basically everything that could be scanned. I spent 3 months scanning everything. Over 3000 pics and docs. Burned the images to cd's and gave them to my brothers, sisters and nieces and nephews as Christmas gifts.


When I scan the slides/negatives in, it takes about 10 minutes per batch of 4. (epson v600, @ around 6400 dpi)

Believe me, I am eager to scan them all in, but it just takes so long. I've dedicated a few saturdays to the task, and have managed maybe 120-150. Complicating the task is that the slides were all in long metal slide holders that got somewhat crushed by a collapsed barn. Probably 90% of the slides survived (he had several series of glass slides that didn't) but they were all jumbled, and tossed in a huge box when rescued by the insurance people. So, in addition to scanning, I've been trying to separate them into related batches based on hand written notes, sometimes dates, sometimes places, sometimes slide holder #, sometimes f-stop/exposure info - so I can know when/where every slide was taken. It's pretty time consuming.

But you guys have motivated me to resume the project.


img.fark.net

Heres one from Urakami cathedral, ground zero Nagasaki - the head of the charred statute was later taken by the pope and sent on a  tour around the world apparently.  img.fark.net
img.fark.net

img.fark.net
 
2014-04-22 03:02:33 AM  

Colour_out_of_Space: Cletus C.: Who is this mystery WWII soldier?

[encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com image 194x259]

Not necessarily a cool story, but as a child I learned the word "bludgeon" from the news reports about Crane's death.


I learned what the world "dildo" meant from a newspaper story. At nine years old, reading the newspaper in a crowded donut shop with my father. Of course I asked right out loud.
 
2014-04-22 07:10:00 PM  

ISO15693: CaptSS: bugcrusher: ISO15693: My grandfather served in the military (Navy) for over 40 years - he was one of the first E9's (Master Chief Petty Officer)

He was also a photographer, and I have a crate full of old slides from the 1940's and 1950's of his, including his logbook from serving on the USS Pennsylvania which is full of photos of his shipmates.

Anyone have any suggestions?...hundreds and hundreds of old slides of just post-WWII Japan, Philippines, Hong Kong, San Fran, Hawaii, etc....Ive only started to scan some in.

Let me get your frequency straight.  You're in close proximity of all these photos, and you don't have the amplitude to take it farther?  ISO15693, that doesn't sound right.
My advice to you is to scan the best of these, and relevant sections of the logbook, put them into a nice format in a PDF, and then self-publish them as a gift for your family.  It's not real expensive, and it's a unique and personal view of a time in history that your descendants will have for a long time.  From the small sample you've posted here, they're great photos.  If you do find a WW2 photo archive, all the better.  Talk to your local or state archives, they'll know what to do with them.

This. A couple of years ago I went to my dad's house and gathered every document and picture I could find. Shoe boxes full of pics, pics off the refrigerator, stuffed in drawers, report cards from when we were in elementary school, dad's pics from high school as well as his time served during the Korean War - basically everything that could be scanned. I spent 3 months scanning everything. Over 3000 pics and docs. Burned the images to cd's and gave them to my brothers, sisters and nieces and nephews as Christmas gifts.

When I scan the slides/negatives in, it takes about 10 minutes per batch of 4. (epson v600, @ around 6400 dpi)

Believe me, I am eager to scan them all in, but it just takes so long. I've dedicated a few saturdays to the task, and have managed maybe 120-150. Compli ...


Those pics look like 1949-50, or maybe 1948 at the earliest.  That Navy helicopter debuted in 1948.  Cool shots.
 
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