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(The Atlantic)   The sorry state of American beer   (theatlantic.com) divider line 212
    More: Sad, American beers, market segments, Miller High Life, Information Resources Inc.  
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11782 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Apr 2014 at 7:05 AM (20 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-21 05:23:49 PM
Well, what I can extrapolate from these graphs:

1-Americans have AWFUL taste in beer.
2-Craft Beers are going up all around, and that's good.
3-Of the Imports, Modelo and Dos Equis are doing well, which leads me to believe the Most Interesting Man in the World (Dos Equis) and Clint Dempsey (Captain of the US National Team and Modelo spokesman) are good for advertising.
4-The "New Belgium" "Craft Beer" brand is working, even if it is a major corporation pushing a new image.
5-I don't believe it either that Blue Moon is America's favorite beer. But if it is, that's kinda weird.
 
2014-04-21 06:07:10 PM
SW Michigan..  We have Bell's, Dark Horse, Founders, Arcadia.. All have a plethora of IPAs as well as Lagers, stouts, etc.
I'll still buy a 30 case of some natty light because it's cheap and palatable for drunken golfing, drunken fishing, drunken.. well, you get the idea.. it's good for getting a group of people drunk from a cooler.  Most craft breweries are just getting into the canning business, so most still aren't an option for anything involving water/beaches.
 
2014-04-21 06:23:07 PM
As other states are embracing the craft brewing industry, Florida is set to stifle and cripple it with a bill that the state Senate is poised to pass. Ah Florida, we were almost cool. (well maybe gingerly approaching cool. ok just tolerable, but still that is a step up).
 
2014-04-21 06:34:38 PM

NakedDrummer: JackieRabbit: Don't know what article you are referring to. A beer can be mass-produced and still be quite good, as the Mexicans, Asians, and Europeans prove. Even some American beers are quite good. But the most popular ones scarcely qualify as beer. They are just malted beverages. Sorry, but if you are adding sugar to your beer after it has been brewed and before bottling, you aren't selling a real beer. There is never any good excuse to use artificial ingredients in beer, wine or spirits. A good brewer or distiller doesn't need them.

Which mass-produced beer from those areas are you referring to as "quite good"?  Mexican mass produced beer: Corona? Tecate?  Bleech...  Asians:  Singha?  Chang?  Sapporo?  Bleech... Europe:  Carling? Heineken? Stella? Jupiler? Urquell? Carslberg?  Bleech...  Nothing I'd consider any improvement over the American mass-produced beers.


To be fair, most if not all of the beers you cite suffer from the fact that they have to be shipped to the States.  No matter what the beer, if you make it spend months baking in a container ship and then sitting in a warehouse, it's going to taste pretty awful.

On the other hand, if you get it close to the source it can be pretty good.  Take Kronenbourg 1664, for instance.  I've never had a good bottle of it in the States.  However, I go to Strasbourg fairly frequently on business, and when you have Kronenbourg on tap, at a bar just down the road from the brewery, it approaches the sublime.
 
2014-04-21 06:58:15 PM
Maul555: Robo Beat: I like a good IPA as much as anyone, but there gets to be a point where the stuff is so potently hopped you kind of wonder what it is that the brewer is trying to hide from you.


Anyway, all styles have their time and place.  Miller High Life might not be the kind of beer you order at a gastropub, but damned if an ice chest full of them isn't a beautiful sight on a hot summer day.

Maybe its just me, but on a hot summers day I just sweat and sweat, and I cant even look at a beer or soda...  Give me water, gatorade, and more water...  Once I recover I can start entertaining thoughts of beer...


Gatorade and vodak is my "lawnmower beer"
 
2014-04-21 08:03:41 PM
Just drink what you like?  I'm having some fun trying a lot of the New Berlin beers now that they are available in BC.  Rampant Double IPA, and Le Terroir are terrific.

http://www.newbelgium.com/beer/detail.aspx?id=e5d60cce-6eea-4ef9-a30 0- 0a46e8ce5123
 
2014-04-21 08:03:59 PM

Mr. Right: Marcintosh: odd, just saw a movie with an actor actually "drinking" one of these -

[onmilwaukee.com image 400x300]

was surprised his noggin didn't collapse into it's self like a shrunken head

[wpb.org image 848x477]

Oh, God.  I remember those.  Just take the l out of the name to describe the gastric effect.  Profound gastric effect.  W-a-a-a-y more effective than X-lax but without that enticing flavor.


to be fair, in the early '70s and earlier, it WAS good american beer.  It outsold Bud in many markets.  They bet the company on a new type of brewing (went from top brew to center brew) and they made a new brewery to support their demand (which again, was HUGE)  Was supposed to taste exactly the same and instead tasted god awful.  Local stores couldn't GIVE it away.  Everyone thought it'd gone bad.
Since they'd gone into debt to finance the new brewery and cratered their name, they were done for.
I'd heard that Stroh's had bought them out.
 
2014-04-21 08:23:54 PM

GoSurfing: I choose to consume Miller Low Life, because I am one.


Quit drinking on the job and get back to milling my flour
 
2014-04-21 10:29:15 PM

Robo Beat: NakedDrummer: JackieRabbit: Don't know what article you are referring to. A beer can be mass-produced and still be quite good, as the Mexicans, Asians, and Europeans prove. Even some American beers are quite good. But the most popular ones scarcely qualify as beer. They are just malted beverages. Sorry, but if you are adding sugar to your beer after it has been brewed and before bottling, you aren't selling a real beer. There is never any good excuse to use artificial ingredients in beer, wine or spirits. A good brewer or distiller doesn't need them.

Which mass-produced beer from those areas are you referring to as "quite good"?  Mexican mass produced beer: Corona? Tecate?  Bleech...  Asians:  Singha?  Chang?  Sapporo?  Bleech... Europe:  Carling? Heineken? Stella? Jupiler? Urquell? Carslberg?  Bleech...  Nothing I'd consider any improvement over the American mass-produced beers.

To be fair, most if not all of the beers you cite suffer from the fact that they have to be shipped to the States.  No matter what the beer, if you make it spend months baking in a container ship and then sitting in a warehouse, it's going to taste pretty awful.

On the other hand, if you get it close to the source it can be pretty good.  Take Kronenbourg 1664, for instance.  I've never had a good bottle of it in the States.  However, I go to Strasbourg fairly frequently on business, and when you have Kronenbourg on tap, at a bar just down the road from the brewery, it approaches the sublime.


I've had Heineken in Amsterdam.  Carlsberg and Tuborg  in Copenhagan.  Stella, Jupiler, and Primus in Brussels.  Singha and Chang in Bangkok.  Urquell and BudVar in Prague.  and Carling in London.  Even in their home turf it's not any more exciting or any better than Budweiser/Coors/Miller.

Meanwhile, Delerium is damn good in Brussels at the Delerium Café, and it's still damn good on tap here in NYC at the local Belgian bar.

Part of it might be the lame green and clear bottles they use which allows light to get in.  first rule of brewing is to use dark bottles.
 
2014-04-21 11:56:58 PM
Those beers listed as "craft' beers don't look very crafty to me.  Sam Adams and Redhook aren't Bud or Coors, but they aren't little craft brewers either.

Georgetown's "Manny's".  Try it if you are ever in Seattle. It's good stuff.
 
2014-04-22 09:00:51 AM
old.post-gazette.com
 
2014-04-22 09:45:45 AM

WinoRhino: CheekyMonkey: 'India Pale Lager' sounds like something dreamed up by a marketing team, likely the same one who came up with "ice", "dry" and "lite".  Brand extension BS.

It's an interesting idea, and I have had a couple that were good beers, but not quite my style. Lagers to me are good because they have a crisp. clean, drinkability. Pilsners especially because they are so hard to get exactly right. You can't hide much in a pilsner. So adding an overly hopped flavor doesn't seem to work well with it, especially since (in my opinion) a sweet malt backbone is essential to having a good IPA.


Pilsners, for me, are in the category of "too boring, why bother"?  They are the beer equivalent of tofu*, eaten straight out of the package.

*note that I'm not anti-tofu.  It can be quite tasty, marinated and baked
 
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