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(The Atlantic)   The sorry state of American beer   (theatlantic.com) divider line 212
    More: Sad, American beers, market segments, Miller High Life, Information Resources Inc.  
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11782 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Apr 2014 at 7:05 AM (21 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



212 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-04-21 09:27:29 AM

JackieRabbit: The problem with American beer is the drinkers of it. American beer isn't really beer anymore. It doesn't have to be, since Americans, despite how much of it they drink, don't really like it. Budweiser's primary grain is now corn and it has a lot of sugar and artificial ingredients. Manufacturers don't have to mass-produce a quality product, so they don't. It is interesting to note that the top imports aren't much better than their American competition. The FA doesn't mention that many "imported" beers are no longer imported, but brewed right here in the US by mostly Ambev breweries and the stuff made here isn't anything like the originals.


You read that stupid "8 beers you should never drink again" didn't you?  There's actually a good reason US beers have corn and other grains, and adding sugars or "artificial ingredients" is extremely common, even in the most crafty beers.

There's a time and place for all beers, even mass produced domestics.
 
2014-04-21 09:29:45 AM

Skr: Only the Bud ICE Penguin can save the sagging American Beer Industry.


/doobie doobie doo


We drank the shiat out of that in college 5.5% ABV (I believe) and it tasted pretty decent for shiatty beer.

/doobie doobie dooooo
 
2014-04-21 09:30:35 AM

thehobbes: Also, stop doing secondaries in whiskey barrels. If I wanted whiskey I'd order it. Rye on rye is just masking the flavor of your poor grain mix


Oh go straight to hell, troll boy. A bourbon barrel aging on the right beer can be completely incredible.
 
2014-04-21 09:36:29 AM
3.bp.blogspot.com

Consumable after thirty years in a hot VW? That's my kind of beer!
 
2014-04-21 09:36:50 AM

natebpunkd: Well, I for one, am perfectly content with my beer scene. Miller Lite for mass quantity consumption. Then there is a rotation of the following based on availability:
1. Lake Louie Warped Speed Scotch Ale
2. Dogfish Head 90 Minute IPA
(So happy this is being distributed to WI again)
3. New Belgium Brewing Fat Tire
4. Ale Asylum Hopalicious


You and I could probably drink together. Miller Lite is my give-a-shiat beer. My top 5 in some sort of order:

1. Rogue Dead Guy
2. St. Arnold Amber
3. Dale's Pale Ale
4. Sierra Nevada Pale Ale
5. Tim Taylor's Landlord (UK only)
 
2014-04-21 09:37:24 AM

Maul555: Robo Beat: I like a good IPA as much as anyone, but there gets to be a point where the stuff is so potently hopped you kind of wonder what it is that the brewer is trying to hide from you.


Anyway, all styles have their time and place.  Miller High Life might not be the kind of beer you order at a gastropub, but damned if an ice chest full of them isn't a beautiful sight on a hot summer day.

Maybe its just me, but on a hot summers day I just sweat and sweat, and I cant even look at a beer or soda...  Give me water, gatorade, and more water...  Once I recover I can start entertaining thoughts of beer...


That's why I enjoy Coors light when I am outside and it's 100+ degrees.
 
2014-04-21 09:40:19 AM

lilbordr: cache.boston.com


You tard, you're supposed to drink Heady Topper from the can. It says so on the lip of the can!
 
2014-04-21 09:40:47 AM

FunkyBlue: WTF Indeed: That's a lot of concern trolling over beer. However the real problem with American CRAFT beer is that everyone wants to make an IPA.

Becuase the American beer palette was basically trained for bitter, hoppy beers. We've been trained for years through commericals that Budweiser is real beer and how it's supposed to taste. So, we drink enough of it and it's what we've become accustomed to. it's also easier and cheaper to make a hop-filled lager than a decent beer, so that's what a lot of craft brewers seem to make for this market. Even their stouts are hoppy, bitter messes. All I know is that I'm sick of walking into a bar that advertises craft beers on tap and all they have are beers called "HopBomb", "HopSlam", or "HopPocalypse".



Who is this "we" you speak of. Do you have a mouse in your pocket?
 
2014-04-21 09:46:27 AM

voodoohotdog: CruJones: I have no trouble finding a good beer, ever.  Just keep your mountain of hops out, thanks.

I couldn't agree more. 65% of my sales (in a very small venue) are craft beers. I've asked my reps, why this (the over hopping)  is going on. First you get the official answer; "It makes a distinctive product that discerning drinkers can easily differentiate from the others."

But for them what i think it's about is the fact that IPA's ship and store better. Something about the hops. On the consumer side it's like the hot sauce crowd. "Look what I can tolerate!" It becomes a status symbol to be able to drink an ale that literally tastes like a grapefruit it is so hoppy.


There was a hop shortage early on in the explosion of American Craft Breweries.  With the dawn of the culture of craft beer consumers in the 90s to 00s demanding variety and getting loads of lagers, the market was primed and ready for hop-laden IPA's when hops became more available again in (I think) 2008-2009.

Currently, there's a move away from fresh, heavily hopped beers and over towards aged belgians and stouts.

The most annoying trend right now is the farking hot pepper beers.  Everyone with a brew-restaurant has to have one on tap.  Taking up valuable real estate that could be holding a chocolate stout or a kolsch this time of year.
 
2014-04-21 09:46:32 AM

t3knomanser: hubiestubert: It's a phase, and it's easily avoidable.

It is and it isn't. It sucks when a bar you like hops (ahem) on the bandwagon and devotes all the taps to nothing but hoppy beers, with maybe one stout mixed it. Yeah, you can go someplace else, but it's sad when a bar you like gets kinda crappy.


That's why God gave us bourbon...
 
2014-04-21 09:48:07 AM
I want to get drunk, I want to get drunk cheap, and I want to get drunk without gaining too much weight.

Hello, Natural Light.
 
2014-04-21 09:48:21 AM

StrikitRich: CruJones: I have no trouble finding a good beer, ever.  Just keep your mountain of hops out, thanks.

WTF Indeed: That's a lot of concern trolling over beer. However the real problem with American CRAFT beer is that everyone wants to make an IPA.

Was at a large liquor store on Saturday and they had a bunch of sixers marked down 50%.  When I looked to see what they were they were all IPAs and other super hopped beers that nobody was buying.


I've been seeing a lot of that, too. I really like big, stupidly-overhopped IPAs, but they're something I drink at the bar.  I never really want to drink more than one at a time, so I rarely buy them in six packs.

That said, if I see a discounted six pack of Hopslam, I'm all over it.
 
2014-04-21 09:48:27 AM

hubiestubert: Erix: So many people complain about IPAs being popular. It's not like brewers have stopped making other options though. Don't like hops? Great! There are more options available now than ever. Hoppy stuff is just high profile now.

There's just a huge amount of choice in the market now. If you're not an fan of super hoppy IPAs, it's fair easy to just get a bottle or draft of something else. In part, it's the market swinging back after so many darks hit "big" with folks. It's a phase, and it's easily avoidable.


Yeah, this.
 
2014-04-21 09:50:34 AM

GregInIndy: thehobbes: Also, stop doing secondaries in whiskey barrels. If I wanted whiskey I'd order it. Rye on rye is just masking the flavor of your poor grain mix

Oh go straight to hell, troll boy. A bourbon barrel aging on the right beer can be completely incredible.


See here, this I like.  People fighting over the merits of barrel aging beer.  Call me a hopeless optimist if you will, but this is a good sign.

I never thought I'd live to see the day that hoppy beers were derided by discerning drinkers.  I love hoppy beers but I don't care, criticize away.

All this says to me is the craft movement is still moving forward, growing like crazy, and I have better choice and easier access to great beers.  We're moving to a place where we can claim it as part of our culture again and not be embarrassed about it.

Cheers.
 
2014-04-21 09:53:58 AM
Glad to know I'm not the only one sick of IPAs.

Had this earlier last week:

cdn.beeradvocate.com

It was like drinking carbonated grapefruit juice. Bleh.

However, I later had this, and it was awesome:

ecbiz122.inmotionhosting.com

Also, fark the domestic mega-brewers. They've had far too much power in what our choices are for too long and definitely need to be taken down a few notches.
 
2014-04-21 09:54:43 AM
www.beerandbrewer.com
 
2014-04-21 09:56:28 AM
Don't like it?
Don't drink it.
Yeungling
Mmmmm...
 
2014-04-21 09:59:39 AM
Subby Fail++
& ++ * ++
I could replace this article/headline with any country

"The sorry state of English beer."  "Carling, Fosters, Stella blah blah..."
"The sorry state of Dutch beer."  "Heineken blah blah puke..."
 
zez
2014-04-21 10:00:18 AM
Here is what I think of Laugunitas

bowscollective.com
 
2014-04-21 10:00:29 AM
Why is Sam Adams still considered a "craft" beer?

and btw, Schlitz isn't a bad beer for an American Lager. Better than most of the top of that list for domestic or import.
 
2014-04-21 10:12:53 AM

GregInIndy: Living in relatively li'l old Indianapolis, there're now a ridiculous number of local breweries. Off the top of my head: Sun King, Fountain Square, Upland, Flat12, Outliers, Bier, Black Acre, Union (does only casked stuff, kinda niche), Brugge, Broad Ripple BrewPub, Thr3e Wisemen, Cutters, Daredevil, IN City, Oaken Barrel, Tow Yard, Triton.

It is NUTS. And if I expand my view to all of IN and the larger region we start getting to epic successes like Three Floyds, Founders & Bell's. Why would I ever, ever buy some mega-beer when incredible product in near infinite variety is all over the place? I just keep empty growlers in the car & check my phone to see who's got what on tap today.


*indy high five

I love me some sun kind and oaken barrel.
 
2014-04-21 10:14:10 AM
So, based on nothing but my opinion and initial thoughts on the matter (I have no hard evidence) here's what I think is happening in the USA beer market:

When examining sales on a national level, Bud Miller Coors still have the largest national sales. That's because they distribute everywhere in the entire USA. Every store, every region, every little backwoods convenience store.

Meanwhile, every major metropolitan district, city and even some backwoods places, have their own micro breweries. These craft breweries do not distribute, for the most part, anywhere beyond their immediate geographic area. By that I mean a 20 mile radius.  In Boston I can think of the following beers that are HUGELY popular with craft brew fanatics but cannot be found elsewhere (other Boston area Farkers please chime in):

Jack's Abbey
Mystic
Nightshift
Slumbrew
Clown Shoes
Pretty Things
High and Mighty
Cody Brewing

I've probably forgotten so many. Those beers sell a lot in this area, but their sales aren't included in the assessments people make about craft beer Vs. BMC.  Hardcore beer fanatics don't drink Sam Adams anymore.  I'm not making any judgement about their products, it's just a fact.

So what you have are similar regional micro beer climates in every major metropolitan area where no-name breweries are controlling the bulk of the craft beer market. And this doesn't even include brew pubs that make their own stuff locally and don't distribute at all to stores.

So the beer market in the USA is better than ever. It's just changing dramatically. A very good living can be made brewing good beer just for the local area rather than trying to expand out to national markets.
 
2014-04-21 10:15:10 AM

WTF Indeed: That's a lot of concern trolling over beer. However the real problem with American CRAFT beer is that everyone wants to make an IPA.


Hey guys. I've collected almost enough hops for a six pack of our newest, farking, IPA batch!!

roguefarmsblog.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-04-21 10:18:59 AM

GregInIndy: thehobbes: Also, stop doing secondaries in whiskey barrels. If I wanted whiskey I'd order it. Rye on rye is just masking the flavor of your poor grain mix

Oh go straight to hell, troll boy. A bourbon barrel aging on the right beer can be completely incredible.


Its too expensive to try to use a whiskey barrel to "fix" a bad beer. What usually happens is you have some one who has no idea what they are doing poorly matching the style they wish to age, with the type of barrel they have.
Also, don't let anyone tell you that aging on wood is a long held tradition of the brewmasters art and such claptrap.

beer was stored and shipped in wooden barrels because thats what you had back before the invention of kegs. they were not left overs from the distilling industry, they were purpose made and lined with pitch to keep them from leaking and the wood from contaminating the product inside.

though, good barrel aged beer is a wonderful thing, we just got 20 barrels of just dropped VA Gentlemen that we are going to mostly be putting our flagship Brown ale on.
 
2014-04-21 10:20:47 AM

t3knomanser: Valiente: , I don't even recognize gnat's piss like "Bud Light" as being beer.

For years, I didn't think I  liked beer and stuck to drinking liquor, because at least liquor tasted like something other than sadness. Then I discovered the breadth of beer varieties.


Heh. "Tastes like sadness!" is quite the slogan. I drank liquor in my teens until I bicycled through Britain and asked "what's CAMRA?". Rocked my little world, it did.
 
2014-04-21 10:24:17 AM

CruJones: JackieRabbit: The problem with American beer is the drinkers of it. American beer isn't really beer anymore. It doesn't have to be, since Americans, despite how much of it they drink, don't really like it. Budweiser's primary grain is now corn and it has a lot of sugar and artificial ingredients. Manufacturers don't have to mass-produce a quality product, so they don't. It is interesting to note that the top imports aren't much better than their American competition. The FA doesn't mention that many "imported" beers are no longer imported, but brewed right here in the US by mostly Ambev breweries and the stuff made here isn't anything like the originals.

You read that stupid "8 beers you should never drink again" didn't you?  There's actually a good reason US beers have corn and other grains, and adding sugars or "artificial ingredients" is extremely common, even in the most crafty beers.

There's a time and place for all beers, even mass produced domestics.


Don't know what article you are referring to. A beer can be mass-produced and still be quite good, as the Mexicans, Asians, and Europeans prove. Even some American beers are quite good. But the most popular ones scarcely qualify as beer. They are just malted beverages. Sorry, but if you are adding sugar to your beer after it has been brewed and before bottling, you aren't selling a real beer. There is never any good excuse to use artificial ingredients in beer, wine or spirits. A good brewer or distiller doesn't need them.
 
2014-04-21 10:27:06 AM
i1.ytimg.com

Put on your 'Hops Face'
 
2014-04-21 10:28:33 AM
media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com

"I know what you're thinking, snob. You're thinking "did he drink all six beers or only five?" Now to tell you the truth I forgot myself in all this excitement. But being this is Pabst Blue Ribbon, the most popular beer in the world, you've gotta ask yourself a question: "Do I feel thirsty?" Well, do ya, snob? "
 
2014-04-21 10:32:11 AM

WinoRhino: So, based on nothing but my opinion and initial thoughts on the matter (I have no hard evidence) here's what I think is happening in the USA beer market:

When examining sales on a national level, Bud Miller Coors still have the largest national sales. That's because they distribute everywhere in the entire USA. Every store, every region, every little backwoods convenience store.

Meanwhile, every major metropolitan district, city and even some backwoods places, have their own micro breweries. These craft breweries do not distribute, for the most part, anywhere beyond their immediate geographic area. By that I mean a 20 mile radius.  In Boston I can think of the following beers that are HUGELY popular with craft brew fanatics but cannot be found elsewhere (other Boston area Farkers please chime in):

Jack's Abbey
Mystic
Nightshift
Slumbrew
Clown Shoes
Pretty Things
High and Mighty
Cody Brewing

I've probably forgotten so many. Those beers sell a lot in this area, but their sales aren't included in the assessments people make about craft beer Vs. BMC.  Hardcore beer fanatics don't drink Sam Adams anymore.  I'm not making any judgement about their products, it's just a fact.

So what you have are similar regional micro beer climates in every major metropolitan area where no-name breweries are controlling the bulk of the craft beer market. And this doesn't even include brew pubs that make their own stuff locally and don't distribute at all to stores.

So the beer market in the USA is better than ever. It's just changing dramatically. A very good living can be made brewing good beer just for the local area rather than trying to expand out to national markets.


You can get Clown Shoes in a lot of places. Houston and Atlanta for sure. I'm sure elsewhere.
 
2014-04-21 10:34:54 AM
As for all the posts for and against IPAs...

There are a lot of crappy over-hopped beers out there that are a complete waste of money because they are truly badly brewed beers.  There are a lot of terrific IPAs out there that are really excellent beers with terrific structure and great flavor.

To me, the difference is brewers who understand that having a solid malt backbone is essential, and that hops can be added for flavor as well as aroma and bitterness. A 120 IBU beer that is thin with no malt character is going to taste like crap. Maybe some people like hop soup, who knows? But there are rules of thumb about how many IBU you should have in a beer based on the original gravity of your brew. Pay attention to that ratio and the beer will probably turn out pretty good.

I just made an IPA that was 8.3% ABV and 100 IBU. I have never brewed anything with that much bitterness before because I'm generally not a fan of it, but I wanted to show some people how it could be done properly. The majority of my hop additions came with 20 or less minutes left in the boil. Yes it was bitter, but it was teeming with flavors like grapefruit, orange, mango and amazing floral notes. I used a half pound of honey malt and a little bit of munich malt to sweeten it up a bit and give it good malt character. A friend who rants against IPAs loved it.


If you don't like bitter beers, great, everyone gets that. Don't buy them. But you are also correct to say a lot of them are horrible. If you like a little hop flavor but don't want to get overwhelmed, buy IPAs based on their IBU and keep it on the lower side of things. Maybe target beers with specific hops that have flavors you like (Citra, Centenial, Amarillo, and Cascade all being fruity instead of piney, for example).
 
2014-04-21 10:36:23 AM

voodoohotdog: CruJones: I have no trouble finding a good beer, ever.  Just keep your mountain of hops out, thanks.

I couldn't agree more. 65% of my sales (in a very small venue) are craft beers. I've asked my reps, why this (the over hopping)  is going on. First you get the official answer; "It makes a distinctive product that discerning drinkers can easily differentiate from the others."

But for them what i think it's about is the fact that IPA's ship and store better. Something about the hops. On the consumer side it's like the hot sauce crowd. "Look what I can tolerate!" It becomes a status symbol to be able to drink an ale that literally tastes like a grapefruit it is so hoppy.


You can cover most off-flavors or batch-to-batch consistency issues by dry hopping.
 
2014-04-21 10:36:47 AM

Robo Beat: I like a good IPA as much as anyone, but there gets to be a point where the stuff is so potently hopped you kind of wonder what it is that the brewer is trying to hide from you.


Anyway, all styles have their time and place.  Miller High Life might not be the kind of beer you order at a gastropub, but damned if an ice chest full of them isn't a beautiful sight on a hot summer day.


True dat.

*offers JAGUART a kitty high five*
 
2014-04-21 10:37:44 AM

HaywoodJablonski: You can get Clown Shoes in a lot of places. Houston and Atlanta for sure. I'm sure elsewhere.


Yeah, actually I meant to take that one off the list. I just got back from Maui and I saw it in a corner store. It blew my mind. Aside from the usual macro brews and local stuff, it was the only other beer in the place. From Ipswich, MA? Weird. It was $12 for a 22oz.
 
2014-04-21 10:41:10 AM

WinoRhino: HaywoodJablonski: You can get Clown Shoes in a lot of places. Houston and Atlanta for sure. I'm sure elsewhere.

Yeah, actually I meant to take that one off the list. I just got back from Maui and I saw it in a corner store. It blew my mind. Aside from the usual macro brews and local stuff, it was the only other beer in the place. From Ipswich, MA? Weird. It was $12 for a 22oz.


Heh. I had a similar experience living in England. It's odd which American beers they decide to import. You can't find Bud Light, Miller Lite or any of the other major beers there. However, I ran into a few pubs that have Coors Light draught available. Really? Why?!
 
2014-04-21 10:45:59 AM

Robo Beat: Anyway, all styles have their time and place.  Miller High Life might not be the kind of beer you order at a gastropub, but damned if an ice chest full of them isn't a beautiful sight on a hot summer day.


For Easter yesterday I went to my parents' house and brought a few of my recent homebrews for my dad and brother. My bro brought me a bottle of KBS and  some other aged stout. I was trying to figure out what to have when I spotted the sixer of Corona Light in the garage fridge. I was going to be on grill duty, so I grabbed one of those instead of the others.
 
2014-04-21 10:46:50 AM

HaywoodJablonski: WinoRhino: HaywoodJablonski: You can get Clown Shoes in a lot of places. Houston and Atlanta for sure. I'm sure elsewhere.

Yeah, actually I meant to take that one off the list. I just got back from Maui and I saw it in a corner store. It blew my mind. Aside from the usual macro brews and local stuff, it was the only other beer in the place. From Ipswich, MA? Weird. It was $12 for a 22oz.

Heh. I had a similar experience living in England. It's odd which American beers they decide to import. You can't find Bud Light, Miller Lite or any of the other major beers there. However, I ran into a few pubs that have Coors Light draught available. Really? Why?!


Palate cleanser between good bitters?
 
2014-04-21 10:48:40 AM
I think this Hop Death fad will fade soon enough.

Remember a while back the fad was to create beers that were 10%+ alcohol with no regards to flavor or balance?  Eventually the fad diminished and the bad ones were mostly weeded out and we were left with the handful that weren't so putrid.

I am seeing more and more craft breweries putting put Belgian styles and imperials.  I just grabbed a American made sour last night even.
 
2014-04-21 10:50:27 AM
An IPA that tastes like citrus is a positive thing. Mostly they just taste bitter.
 
2014-04-21 10:52:23 AM

Cyno01: Cheesehead_Dave: [scontent-a-ord.xx.fbcdn.net image 640x640]


Hoppy Easter!


Theres really only one correct choice for a beer to put in an easter basket...

[hoppeduphype.files.wordpress.com image 850x1397]


I would disagree:   http://www.duclaw.com/beer/sweet-baby-jesus/
 
2014-04-21 10:56:35 AM
brewpublic.com
 
2014-04-21 11:00:17 AM

Beautiful_Geek: An IPA that tastes like citrus is a positive thing. Mostly they just taste bitter.


In Hawaii last week I had Big Island Brewhaus' "Overboard IPA". I love fruit-forward hops a lot more than the pine ones and this one was all fruit. But what I thought was terrific about this one and worth mentioning was that it was a paltry (by comparison) 50 IBU. That's it. But the hop flavor and nose was outstanding. It had to have been all really late additions. Definitely need more IPAs like this one.
 
2014-04-21 11:01:40 AM
also good on a hot day

www.totalwine.com
 
2014-04-21 11:06:13 AM

FunkyBlue: WTF Indeed: That's a lot of concern trolling over beer. However the real problem with American CRAFT beer is that everyone wants to make an IPA.

Becuase the American beer palette was basically trained for bitter, hoppy beers. We've been trained for years through commericals that Budweiser is real beer and how it's supposed to taste. So, we drink enough of it and it's what we've become accustomed to. it's also easier and cheaper to make a hop-filled lager than a decent beer, so that's what a lot of craft brewers seem to make for this market. Even their stouts are hoppy, bitter messes. All I know is that I'm sick of walking into a bar that advertises craft beers on tap and all they have are beers called "HopBomb", "HopSlam", or "HopPocalypse".


Wat?  The American beer palette is trained for almost-hop-free corn-and-rice-filled light lagers.  No one is making "hop-filled lagers".  Unless you are so confused that you think that IPAs are lagers...

\India Pale Ale
 
2014-04-21 11:07:16 AM

WinoRhino: Beautiful_Geek: An IPA that tastes like citrus is a positive thing. Mostly they just taste bitter.

In Hawaii last week I had Big Island Brewhaus' "Overboard IPA". I love fruit-forward hops a lot more than the pine ones and this one was all fruit. But what I thought was terrific about this one and worth mentioning was that it was a paltry (by comparison) 50 IBU. That's it. But the hop flavor and nose was outstanding. It had to have been all really late additions. Definitely need more IPAs like this one.


That actually sounds appealing. Probably not something you can get on the East Coast.
 
2014-04-21 11:09:03 AM
www.wineandcheeseplace.com
 
2014-04-21 11:11:14 AM
Any beer-loving Farkers passing through DC should check out this place:  http://ironhorsedc.com/

Decent selection of craft brews on tap, and the bartender is probably the nicest bartender I've ever run into.
 
2014-04-21 11:11:21 AM
Bells Oberon
 
2014-04-21 11:11:34 AM

CheekyMonkey: FunkyBlue: WTF Indeed: That's a lot of concern trolling over beer. However the real problem with American CRAFT beer is that everyone wants to make an IPA.

Becuase the American beer palette was basically trained for bitter, hoppy beers. We've been trained for years through commericals that Budweiser is real beer and how it's supposed to taste. So, we drink enough of it and it's what we've become accustomed to. it's also easier and cheaper to make a hop-filled lager than a decent beer, so that's what a lot of craft brewers seem to make for this market. Even their stouts are hoppy, bitter messes. All I know is that I'm sick of walking into a bar that advertises craft beers on tap and all they have are beers called "HopBomb", "HopSlam", or "HopPocalypse".

Wat?  The American beer palette is trained for almost-hop-free corn-and-rice-filled light lagers.  No one is making "hop-filled lagers".  Unless you are so confused that you think that IPAs are lagers...

\India Pale Ale


Actually, India Pale Lagers are a thing and people are making them, especially homebrewers.

beerpulse.com
 
2014-04-21 11:11:40 AM
I cant enjoy good beer at home because I would get a 6 pak have 2 then the rest would disappear since the roomate is an drunk.
 
2014-04-21 11:11:58 AM
Why is it sad?  There are still plenty of options if you want cheap light beer, but now there are also tons of options if you want beer that tastes good.  I would have to agree that a lot of bars seem to only have IPAs on tap and it's hard to get anything else except bottles or cans.  However, I never have trouble finding all kinds of different varieties to try, but I'm spoiled because we have Total Wine.
 
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