Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Science Daily)   Scientists discover the Cuckoo Mafia is real. ANIMANIACS WARNED US AND WE DIDN'T LISTEN   ( sciencedaily.com) divider line
    More: Scary, cuckoo mafia, brood parasites, evolutionary biology, jackass, Creative Commons licenses, restaurant owners, Max Planck Institute, nests  
•       •       •

2306 clicks; posted to Geek » on 20 Apr 2014 at 1:52 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



19 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-04-20 12:31:01 PM  
Well...I guess there's nothing left to do now but consult the Wheel of Morality.

img3.wikia.nocookie.net

Wheel of Morality, turn turn turn.  Tell us the lesson that we should learn.
 
2014-04-20 01:01:04 PM  

img.4plebs.org


We didn't ... WE DIDN'T LISTEN!

 
2014-04-20 02:11:21 PM  
Yeah, Goodfeathers. I remember when they said "bada-bing" and it cracked me up as a child. It's not as funny once you learn it's a real saying.

/Fuhgeddaboutit
 
2014-04-20 02:36:10 PM  
We've known about brood parasites for awhile. Why is this new to anyone?

/warning: above is sad. Poor warbler chick....
 
2014-04-20 03:08:24 PM  
It's because we were too distra-HELLOOOOOOOOO NURSE!!

sp6.fotolog.com
 
2014-04-20 03:19:52 PM  

Ishkur: We've known about brood parasites for awhile. Why is this new to anyone?

/warning: above is sad. Poor warbler chick....



The paper that TFA is referencing (pdf) is not just about the existence of brood parasites, but seeks to explain in an evolutionary context why some hosts tolerate a certain amount of said brood parasites. This modelling study assesses one mechanism - acceptance of brood parasites to stave off retaliatory depredation of subsequent nests by the parasites.  The novel bit about the paper (at least to my eyes) is the incorporation of repeated interactions in the model, and the use of retaliation as a strategy to induceacceptance by the host.

It's an interesting paper - I suggest skimming it if you're interested in the topic.
 
2014-04-20 05:07:41 PM  
Previously seen only in field observations, scientists have now modeled this behavior mathematically

That's some dangerously backwards thinking. Literally figuratively cart before the horse stuff.
 
2014-04-20 05:36:12 PM  
 
2014-04-20 06:06:44 PM  

xanadian: Well...I guess there's nothing left to do now but consult the Wheel of Morality.

Wheel of Morality, turn turn turn.  Tell us the lesson that we should learn.


A trip to.... TO HAWAII! WE WON, WE WON!
 
2014-04-20 06:43:14 PM  

doglover: Previously seen only in field observations, scientists have now modeled this behavior mathematically

That's some dangerously backwards thinking. Literally figuratively cart before the horse stuff.


Why? Observations shouldn't be used to base modeling off of? They based the standard model of the atom off of observations and derived the rest from how they knew matter interacted. The rest was predictive and has held up to every test so far but it had to initially be based off of observations before the math stuff could be applied.

If you just throw out equations without an observational basis I could show you how to accelerate faster than the speed of light or prove mathematically that goldfish are smarter than humans.

Now, I don't care much for Sociobiology but there are useful things to be done with it. These are complex social interactions presumably driven primarily by instinct and we are starting to see how birds can learn and retain lessons like this in the wild. Knowing they can isn't much help unless it can be modeled. Now they can take other implications in the model not addressed by the observations involved already and see if they can validate those predictions.

The Greeks did it the other way around, building theory based in ideals rather than repeated observations. The result was a bunch of mystery cults and a freezing of natural philosophy for a thousand years. If it isn't rooted in observation it isn't science.
 
2014-04-20 07:34:43 PM  

xanadian: Well...I guess there's nothing left to do now but consult the Wheel of Morality.

[img3.wikia.nocookie.net image 640x480]

Wheel of Morality, turn turn turn.  Tell us the lesson that we should learn.


Moral #5. And the moral of today's story is...

Early to rise and early to bed makes a man healthy, but socially dead.
 
2014-04-20 10:54:57 PM  

Kurobei: xanadian: Well...I guess there's nothing left to do now but consult the Wheel of Morality.

[img3.wikia.nocookie.net image 640x480]

Wheel of Morality, turn turn turn.  Tell us the lesson that we should learn.

Moral #5. And the moral of today's story is...

Early to rise and early to bed makes a man healthy, but socially dead.


If you can't say something nice...

...you're probably at the Icecapades.
 
2014-04-20 10:56:44 PM  

BolloxReader: doglover: Previously seen only in field observations, scientists have now modeled this behavior mathematically

That's some dangerously backwards thinking. Literally figuratively cart before the horse stuff.

Why? Observations shouldn't be used to base modeling off of? They based the standard model of the atom off of observations and derived the rest from how they knew matter interacted. The rest was predictive and has held up to every test so far but it had to initially be based off of observations before the math stuff could be applied.


Agreed.  You want to be sure your model agrees with reality before you start using it to make predictions.

If reality disagrees with your model, it means the model is wrong and needs to be fixed.
 
2014-04-21 01:12:54 AM  

Bondith: BolloxReader: doglover: Previously seen only in field observations, scientists have now modeled this behavior mathematically

That's some dangerously backwards thinking. Literally figuratively cart before the horse stuff.

Why? Observations shouldn't be used to base modeling off of? They based the standard model of the atom off of observations and derived the rest from how they knew matter interacted. The rest was predictive and has held up to every test so far but it had to initially be based off of observations before the math stuff could be applied.

Agreed.  You want to be sure your model agrees with reality before you start using it to make predictions.

If reality disagrees with your model, it means the model is wrong and needs to be fixed.


I was thinking more of ranking direct in situ observations (proof) over math (a priori; aka made up).

The proof is the observation. Your ability to make an equation to model it is totally divorced from the reality of the event. If you're good and have lots of data, your equation might work, or not. Reality doesn't care.

The article implies the equation is somehow less than the direct observation of the bb
ehavior.
 
2014-04-21 01:35:03 AM  

B.L.Z. Bub: Yeah, Goodfeathers. I remember when they said "bada-bing" and it cracked me up as a child. It's not as funny once you learn it's a real saying.

/Fuhgeddaboutit


See I grew up in New York so I knew people talking like that my whole life, and I didn't get the joke. I never found them funny.

Chicken Boo on the other hand was hilarious.
 
Skr
2014-04-21 04:34:06 AM  
My favorite bit of Animaniacs was always the "Good Idea; Bad Idea" segments. Really hit home.
 
2014-04-21 06:50:41 AM  

Count_0: Wakko Warner sings!


Watch some of Jess's interviews. He is an Animaniac in real life.
 
2014-04-21 11:31:32 AM  

saintstryfe: B.L.Z. Bub: Yeah, Goodfeathers. I remember when they said "bada-bing" and it cracked me up as a child. It's not as funny once you learn it's a real saying.

/Fuhgeddaboutit

See I grew up in New York so I knew people talking like that my whole life, and I didn't get the joke. I never found them funny.

Chicken Boo on the other hand was hilarious.


I hear he's a giant chicken.
 
2014-04-21 11:33:22 AM  

Skr: My favorite bit of Animaniacs was always the "Good Idea; Bad Idea" segments. Really hit home.


Good idea: playing catch with your grandfather.

Bad idea: playing catch with your grandfather.
 
Displayed 19 of 19 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.

In Other Media
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report