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(KSBW Monterey)   At last, our long national nightmare is over. California farmers will get more water thanks to The Department of Water Resources, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and state and federal officials   (ksbw.com) divider line 118
    More: Followup, Bureau of Reclamation, California Department of Water Resources, Californians, farmers  
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4101 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Apr 2014 at 10:03 AM (26 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-20 08:05:18 AM  
No, fark them. California is a desert. Assholes shouldn't be farming there like it wasn't.

www.forestiere-historicalcenter.com

This guy understood that.
 
2014-04-20 08:35:42 AM  

doglover: No, fark them. California is a desert. Assholes shouldn't be farming there like it wasn't.



This guy understood that.


Of course that's where we get most of our fruits and veggies. So fark all of us.
 
2014-04-20 08:59:27 AM  
Huh.  A "long national nightmare" headline that...kinda was.
 
2014-04-20 10:05:21 AM  
Forget it, Farkers. It's Chinatown.
 
2014-04-20 10:08:34 AM  
Is California even bothering to build any desalination plants?  If freaking Texas can do it I don't see why they can't.

Luckily El Niño appears to be coming this summer, which should fill up most reservoirs.
 
2014-04-20 10:09:30 AM  

EvilEgg: doglover: No, fark them. California is a desert. Assholes shouldn't be farming there like it wasn't.

This guy understood that.

Of course that's where we get most of our fruits and veggies. So fark all of us.


California is the land of fruits and nuts........
 
2014-04-20 10:10:40 AM  

skinink: Forget it, Farkers. It's Chinatown.


Forget it Jake, it's....

*damn!*
 
Skr
2014-04-20 10:11:58 AM  
Am I right in assuming that if one group gets the water, that another group will do with less? They mentioned preventing salt water intrusion, perhaps they should think about more ways to change salt water into fresh water on a grand scale if things keep staying this bad. More research into reverse ozzymoses or something.
 
2014-04-20 10:12:52 AM  
I don't understand the issue here, why don't they build water desalination plants ( reverse osmosis technique) along the coast ?
 
2014-04-20 10:13:07 AM  

CruJones: Is California even bothering to build any desalination plants?  If freaking Texas can do it I don't see why they can't.

Luckily El Niño appears to be coming this summer, which should fill up most reservoirs.


I think so. I read somewhere that we had....15 or so desalination plants in the works.
 
2014-04-20 10:14:02 AM  

Warmnight: I don't understand the issue here, why don't they build water desalination plants ( reverse osmosis technique) along the coast ?


Too bust building monorails to nowhere I guess
 
2014-04-20 10:16:22 AM  

CruJones: Is California even bothering to build any desalination plants?  If freaking Texas can do it I don't see why they can't.

Luckily El Niño appears to be coming this summer, which should fill up most reservoirs.


cdn.rsvlts.com
 
2014-04-20 10:16:23 AM  
Thank God.
 
2014-04-20 10:17:48 AM  

Warmnight: I don't understand the issue here, why don't they build water desalination plants ( reverse osmosis technique) along the coast ?


Energy usage + cost.

It will happen someday but not while it's cheaper to argue over water rights.
 
2014-04-20 10:19:17 AM  
Oh, here's a crazy idea...Hey, California: stop growing oranges in the middle of the f*cking desert.
 
2014-04-20 10:19:32 AM  
But the weather there is so beautiful...
 
2014-04-20 10:19:46 AM  

EvilEgg: doglover: No, fark them. California is a desert. Assholes shouldn't be farming there like it wasn't.
This guy understood that.
Of course that's where we get most of our fruits and veggies. So fark all of us.


All of which has been done at the cost of numerous fish-spawning river tributaries. Probably wasn't the trade-off they were hoping for.
 
2014-04-20 10:19:56 AM  
So what river are they drying up to do this?
 
2014-04-20 10:21:14 AM  

CruJones: Is California even bothering to build any desalination plants?  If freaking Texas can do it I don't see why they can't.

Luckily El Niño appears to be coming this summer, which should fill up most reservoirs.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desalination#United_States

"California has 17 desalination plants in the works, either partially constructed or through exploration and planning phases.[131] The list of locations includes Bay Point, in the Delta, Redwood City, seven in the Santa Cruz / Monterey Bay, Cambria, Oceaneo, Redondo Beach, Huntington Beach, Dana Point, Camp Pendleton, Oceanside and Carlsbad. "
 
2014-04-20 10:21:36 AM  

CruJones: Is California even bothering to build any desalination plants?  If freaking Texas can do it I don't see why they can't.

Luckily El Niño appears to be coming this summer, which should fill up most reservoirs.


That's never a word you want to use when you're depending on something to happen.

/we need to stop shoving more people into CA and NY.
 
2014-04-20 10:23:24 AM  
http://m.bbc.com/news/magazine-26124989

Exporting water
 
2014-04-20 10:25:54 AM  
i.imgur.com

/Oblig
 
2014-04-20 10:28:42 AM  

gaslight: Oh, here's a crazy idea...Hey, California: stop growing oranges in the middle of the f*cking desert.


We don't grow anything in the desert. It's only desert in the south, by Arizona. If you'll notice, our farms are in the valley. It's a big state, you can't determine it to be one big anything. There's deserts, mountains, beaches, lakes, everything.
 
2014-04-20 10:29:49 AM  

Marine1: CruJones: Is California even bothering to build any desalination plants?  If freaking Texas can do it I don't see why they can't.

Luckily El Niño appears to be coming this summer, which should fill up most reservoirs.

That's never a word you want to use when you're depending on something to happen.

/we need to stop shoving more people into CA and NY.


Yes, the rent situation in both is the result of some kind of constant Ponzi scheme, where people keep coming so the market will keep rising.
 
2014-04-20 10:31:12 AM  
Meanwhile, Portland dumps 38 million gallons of water even after tests show it was clean and the alleged "whizzer" denied altering the pool in the first place.

It won't matter if el Nino arrives this summer and fills every reservoir in that state.  They will be out of water by next summer because they have no idea how to manage it, it is all way overly politicized.  It keeps the coast and the inland valley at odds both with each other and with the neighboring states and that suits the politicians just fine.
Divide and conquer and keep the power for yourself.
California is one farked up place.
 
2014-04-20 10:32:02 AM  
Not only do a large portion of the fruits and vegetables we enjoy come from there, most of the places in the U.S. that are capable of producing fresh vegetables year-round are as much a dessert as California.  So if we, as consumers, are going to demand year-round fresh produce, we either have to find water for the farmers, wherever they may be, or we will need to import even more from Mexico and South America than we do now.  Given that there are practically no standards for the pesticides, herbicides, or fertilizers  on  imported fruits and vegetables, you go right ahead and eat that produce.

Or, we could return to freezing and canning all of our own vegetables and fruits when they can be locally grown and are in season and using them throughout the year.  It's called local, seasonal eating.  A lot of folks would argue,however, that having to eat even one meal of canned peas is argument enough for allowing California farmers all the water they want.
 
2014-04-20 10:33:37 AM  

zarker: gaslight: Oh, here's a crazy idea...Hey, California: stop growing oranges in the middle of the f*cking desert.

We don't grow anything in the desert. It's only desert in the south, by Arizona. If you'll notice, our farms are in the valley. It's a big state, you can't determine it to be one big anything. There's deserts, mountains, beaches, lakes, everything.


But I heard that California was a barren desert where they try to grow everything and nothing grows because it's full of liberals and gays!

... or something.
 
2014-04-20 10:34:50 AM  

Leishu: zarker: gaslight: Oh, here's a crazy idea...Hey, California: stop growing oranges in the middle of the f*cking desert.

We don't grow anything in the desert. It's only desert in the south, by Arizona. If you'll notice, our farms are in the valley. It's a big state, you can't determine it to be one big anything. There's deserts, mountains, beaches, lakes, everything.

But I heard that California was a barren desert where they try to grow everything and nothing grows because it's full of liberals and gays!

... or something.


Water a liberal Californian and they do become quite gay.
 
2014-04-20 10:36:47 AM  

zarker: gaslight: Oh, here's a crazy idea...Hey, California: stop growing oranges in the middle of the f*cking desert.

We don't grow anything in the desert. It's only desert in the south, by Arizona. If you'll notice, our farms are in the valley. It's a big state, you can't determine it to be one big anything. There's deserts, mountains, beaches, lakes, everything.


"It's a big state, you can't determine it to be one big anything."

/CF
//if you know what I mean...
///and I think you do


//// it's a cluster fark.
 
2014-04-20 10:37:32 AM  

Warmnight: I don't understand the issue here, why don't they build water desalination plants ( reverse osmosis technique) along the coast ?


Because building things is bad.

Worse, those things will require power, and building power plants is bad.
 
2014-04-20 10:38:13 AM  

Marine1: /we need to stop shoving more people into CA and NY.


Says who...and why? I can't speak to NY, but CA doesn't have a water supply issue. We have a water allocation issue. Our 38 million citizens consume just 13% of the water consumed here for all human uses (agriculture, industry, commercial and household). Agriculture consumes 79% of the water...often by simply flooding the fields. By reducing Ag's share of the water by 10% (they'd still get 90% of their allocation), along with modest improvements to household water consumption efficiency (mainly by not pouring so much on lawns to keep them bright green) we could double our population to 80 million without having to come up with a single drop of additional water or cut back significantly on uses. (Source)
 
2014-04-20 10:39:00 AM  
Brave freedom-loving gun-toting militia squatters and your dammed Federal gummint water?

www.reactionface.info

,,,but gonna stiff you when the bill comes.
 
2014-04-20 10:46:12 AM  

Stone Meadow: Marine1: /we need to stop shoving more people into CA and NY.

Says who...and why? I can't speak to NY, but CA doesn't have a water supply issue. We have a water allocation issue. Our 38 million citizens consume just 13% of the water consumed here for all human uses (agriculture, industry, commercial and household). Agriculture consumes 79% of the water...often by simply flooding the fields. By reducing Ag's share of the water by 10% (they'd still get 90% of their allocation), along with modest improvements to household water consumption efficiency (mainly by not pouring so much on lawns to keep them bright green) we could double our population to 80 million without having to come up with a single drop of additional water or cut back significantly on uses. (Source)


Water's not the only problem. Traffic, real estate, pollution, electricity generation (even the most ardent green Californian doesn't want the solar plant in their backyard), and infrastructure are a few others. Kansas City and St. Louis don't have their fire departments go on high alert because a highway is shut down, regardless of the actual safety problem it poses.

We're going to be spending some real cash in the next century or so to solve those problems. At a certain point, it may be easier (and cheaper) to convince the populace that they should grow used to this thing called "winter" and move to the Midwest where we still have space.

/but the weather is so nice
//and the Midwest is so "backwards".
 
2014-04-20 10:47:10 AM  

Stone Meadow: Marine1: /we need to stop shoving more people into CA and NY.

Says who...and why? I can't speak to NY, but CA doesn't have a water supply issue. We have a water allocation issue. Our 38 million citizens consume just 13% of the water consumed here for all human uses (agriculture, industry, commercial and household). Agriculture consumes 79% of the water...often by simply flooding the fields. By reducing Ag's share of the water by 10% (they'd still get 90% of their allocation), along with modest improvements to household water consumption efficiency (mainly by not pouring so much on lawns to keep them bright green) we could double our population to 80 million without having to come up with a single drop of additional water or cut back significantly on uses. (Source)



Golf clap.

That there was funny.    Using the San Fran Chapter of the Sierra Club as a source.    Too funny.

We ain't got us a water problem.   We just need the Government to allocate it better.    Hehehe...
 
2014-04-20 10:52:33 AM  
They dumped 38 million gallons just cause one guy peed in it.
 
2014-04-20 10:54:28 AM  

EvilEgg: doglover: No, fark them. California is a desert. Assholes shouldn't be farming there like it wasn't.

This guy understood that.

Of course that's where we get most of our fruits and veggies. So fark all of us.


I'm sure his Mountain Dew and Hot Pockets will be safe though.
 
2014-04-20 10:58:25 AM  

chewd: CruJones: Is California even bothering to build any desalination plants?  If freaking Texas can do it I don't see why they can't.

Luckily El Niño appears to be coming this summer, which should fill up most reservoirs.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desalination#United_States

"California has 17 desalination plants in the works, either partially constructed or through exploration and planning phases.[131] The list of locations includes Bay Point, in the Delta, Redwood City, seven in the Santa Cruz / Monterey Bay, Cambria, Oceaneo, Redondo Beach, Huntington Beach, Dana Point, Camp Pendleton, Oceanside and Carlsbad. "


Yeah, I did some googling but ended up more disappointed. One plant was finished but they never brought it online because it rained that year, now it needs huge upgrades to work. San Diego is building a billion dollar one, but they entered into a 30 year contract with a set price that's wicked high.
 
2014-04-20 11:00:24 AM  
Driving through the Central Valley, you'll see many signs like these:

dirtythirdstreets.com

media3.s-nbcnews.com
www.saveelsobrante.com

You'd be forgiven for thinking these tone-deaf farmers thought there was PLENTY of water and those gosh-durn gummint byoo-row-crats just aren't deliverin' it to them patriotic-Americans.

...And if gummint (Bureau of Reclamation plus the State of California itself) didn't build the reservoirs in the first place, the farmers wouldn't have had any irrigation at all.
 
2014-04-20 11:00:31 AM  

CruJones: chewd: CruJones: Is California even bothering to build any desalination plants?  If freaking Texas can do it I don't see why they can't.

Luckily El Niño appears to be coming this summer, which should fill up most reservoirs.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desalination#United_States

"California has 17 desalination plants in the works, either partially constructed or through exploration and planning phases.[131] The list of locations includes Bay Point, in the Delta, Redwood City, seven in the Santa Cruz / Monterey Bay, Cambria, Oceaneo, Redondo Beach, Huntington Beach, Dana Point, Camp Pendleton, Oceanside and Carlsbad. "

Yeah, I did some googling but ended up more disappointed. One plant was finished but they never brought it online because it rained that year, now it needs huge upgrades to work. San Diego is building a billion dollar one, but they entered into a 30 year contract with a set price that's wicked high.


So, you're saying it about the California MONEY, not really the water?
 
2014-04-20 11:02:27 AM  

Marine1: Stone Meadow: Marine1: /we need to stop shoving more people into CA and NY.

Says who...and why? I can't speak to NY, but CA doesn't have a water supply issue. We have a water allocation issue. Our 38 million citizens consume just 13% of the water consumed here for all human uses (agriculture, industry, commercial and household). Agriculture consumes 79% of the water...often by simply flooding the fields. By reducing Ag's share of the water by 10% (they'd still get 90% of their allocation), along with modest improvements to household water consumption efficiency (mainly by not pouring so much on lawns to keep them bright green) we could double our population to 80 million without having to come up with a single drop of additional water or cut back significantly on uses. (Source)

Water's not the only problem. Traffic, real estate, pollution, electricity generation (even the most ardent green Californian doesn't want the solar plant in their backyard), and infrastructure are a few others. Kansas City and St. Louis don't have their fire departments go on high alert because a highway is shut down, regardless of the actual safety problem it poses.

We're going to be spending some real cash in the next century or so to solve those problems. At a certain point, it may be easier (and cheaper) to convince the populace that they should grow used to this thing called "winter" and move to the Midwest where we still have space.

/but the weather is so nice
//and the Midwest is so "backwards".


Just don't send them to Texas, instead.  We're already in watering restrictions, with too damm many people and our pudhead governor and chamber of commerce types recruiting relocation and 'growth' so the developers can keep building in a saturated housing market.  Fark that.

I hear that Omaha is nice.
 
2014-04-20 11:03:10 AM  

BalugaJoe: They dumped 38 million gallons just cause one guy peed in it.


You're two states off.
 
2014-04-20 11:03:28 AM  
snocone:" ...

So, you're saying it about the California MONEY, not really the water?"

Didn't you hear?     California doesn't have water problem.   They have politics problem.
 
2014-04-20 11:03:43 AM  

toadist: That there was funny.    Using the San Fran Chapter of the Sierra Club as a source.    Too funny.


Don't like my source? Find a better one. I'm all ears.

We ain't got us a water problem.   We just need the Government to allocate it better.    Hehehe...

I didn't use the word "problem". I said "issue", so don't move the goalposts. Moreover, you have it all backwards. It's the farmers, Big Ag interests and other "Party of Small Government" aficionados who are hiding behind and using the century-old Federal Gov't water rules to maintain the status quo. California's libruls want a market approach where water can be sold at market rates to ensure it's used as efficiently as possible. If that means cities buy more water to support higher populations instead of farmers pouring it on a few less prune tree orchards, so be it. If the market for rice is so strong they can afford to outbid other users, so be it. But let's not pretend it's some sort of liberal plot to steal the water of honest, hard working farm families.
 
2014-04-20 11:04:12 AM  

Phaeon: Marine1: CruJones: Is California even bothering to build any desalination plants?  If freaking Texas can do it I don't see why they can't.

Luckily El Niño appears to be coming this summer, which should fill up most reservoirs.

That's never a word you want to use when you're depending on something to happen.

/we need to stop shoving more people into CA and NY.

Yes, the rent situation in both is the result of some kind of constant Ponzi scheme, where people keep coming so the market will keep rising.


People coming is good for business. But don't you worry, CA and NY will meet their version of youporn eventually...
 
2014-04-20 11:07:11 AM  

StopLurkListen: Driving through the Central Valley, you'll see many signs like these:






You'd be forgiven for thinking these tone-deaf farmers thought there was PLENTY of water and those gosh-durn gummint byoo-row-crats just aren't deliverin' it to them patriotic-Americans.

...And if gummint (Bureau of Reclamation plus the State of California itself) didn't build the reservoirs in the first place, the farmers wouldn't have had any irrigation at all.


It takes a real doofus to make fun of farmers wanting to produce more food.
 
2014-04-20 11:15:01 AM  

snocone: CruJones: chewd: CruJones: Is California even bothering to build any desalination plants?  If freaking Texas can do it I don't see why they can't.

Luckily El Niño appears to be coming this summer, which should fill up most reservoirs.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desalination#United_States

"California has 17 desalination plants in the works, either partially constructed or through exploration and planning phases.[131] The list of locations includes Bay Point, in the Delta, Redwood City, seven in the Santa Cruz / Monterey Bay, Cambria, Oceaneo, Redondo Beach, Huntington Beach, Dana Point, Camp Pendleton, Oceanside and Carlsbad. "

Yeah, I did some googling but ended up more disappointed. One plant was finished but they never brought it online because it rained that year, now it needs huge upgrades to work. San Diego is building a billion dollar one, but they entered into a 30 year contract with a set price that's wicked high.

So, you're saying it about the California MONEY, not really the water?


That's about right. Not only that, de-sal plants are not magical. They require huge amounts of energy to operate and then you have to get that water from the plant to where it's needed, which could be hundreds of miles. And let's not forget about what to do with all of that salt that results. That has to go somewhere, too. Putting back into the ocean must be done in a controlled manner to avoid damaging sensitive aquatic ecosystems. All of that has a cost. So far it's always been cheaper to continue the ag/urban water war.
 
2014-04-20 11:16:59 AM  

DubtodaIll: StopLurkListen: Driving through the Central Valley, you'll see many signs like these:

You'd be forgiven for thinking these tone-deaf farmers thought there was PLENTY of water and those gosh-durn gummint byoo-row-crats just aren't deliverin' it to them patriotic-Americans.

...And if gummint (Bureau of Reclamation plus the State of California itself) didn't build the reservoirs in the first place, the farmers wouldn't have had any irrigation at all.

It takes a real doofus to make fun of farmers wanting to produce more food.


Right, I'm the bad guy because they're blind to reality and tone-deaf in their messaging.

Or, they could do something other than use 'flood irrigation' to grow near-zero-value crops like alfalfa with precious resources like water.
 
2014-04-20 11:17:02 AM  

zarker: BalugaJoe: They dumped 38 million gallons just cause one guy peed in it.

You're two states off.


One
 
2014-04-20 11:24:09 AM  

Seacop: zarker: BalugaJoe: They dumped 38 million gallons just cause one guy peed in it.

You're two states off.

One


Thought it was Washington. Oops.
 
2014-04-20 11:27:35 AM  

toadist: snocone:" ...

So, you're saying it about the California MONEY, not really the water?"

Didn't you hear?     California doesn't have water problem.   They have politics problem.


You're insisting that urban water users aren't a small fraction of the total water consumption?

www.lao.ca.gov


ca.water.usgs.gov

When supplies of water are insufficient for all users, allocation *is* a political problem.

The answer lies in the direction of finding the best way to use a scarce resource, not sticking your head in the sand.
 
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