If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Daily Mail)   The average bank or insurance document contains more words than it took for Shakespeare to write Macbeth, and they could all be condensed into 'If anything happens, you're farked. Sign here'   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 61
    More: Stupid, Macbeth, Shakespeare, Sending, Fairer Finance, Mice and Men, Tata Consultancy Services, Joseph Conrad, Animal Farm  
•       •       •

2108 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Apr 2014 at 5:11 AM (35 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



61 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-04-19 12:28:25 AM  
HSBC was worst offending bank with more than 34,000 words

"And by signing this you authorize us to use your money to launder narcoterrorist funds because fark you, that's why"
 
2014-04-19 12:40:19 AM  
If brevity is the soul of wit, would not then such wordiness be... witless?

/methinks must surely be so
 
2014-04-19 05:14:41 AM  
When I am king, lawyers will have one page 12 point font, double spaced.
 
2014-04-19 05:19:37 AM  

doglover: When I am king, lawyers will have one page 12 point font, double spaced.


All hail his majesty.

*kneel*
 
2014-04-19 05:20:26 AM  
Wordy, Subby.

Why "...it took for Shakespeare to write Macbeth..."

Why not "...is in Shakespeare's Macbeth..."

Or were you being funny?
 
2014-04-19 05:32:08 AM  

August11: Wordy, Subby.

Why "...it took for Shakespeare to write Macbeth..."

Why not "...is in Shakespeare's Macbeth..."

Or were you being funny?


Because words get used more than once.  I get a rough count of 18 words used in your post but your post has 21 words.

/didn't read the article.
 
GBB
2014-04-19 05:39:33 AM  

doglover: When I am king, lawyers will have one page 12 point font, double spaced.


I, for one, welcome our sensible overlord.
 
2014-04-19 05:50:24 AM  

doglover: When I am king, lawyers will have one page 12 point font, double spaced.


The lawyers accept your terms.

yptalk.files.wordpress.com

Technically, it's a single page.  You didn't specify size.
 
2014-04-19 05:55:22 AM  
Yay freedom!
 
2014-04-19 05:55:40 AM  

doglover: When I am king, lawyers will have one page 12 point font, double spaced.


I nominate myself for His Majesty's Single-Page Overseer. Use of a bigger page than 8.5" x 11" is punishable by imprisonment as "attempting to defraud His Majesty."

/My ruler is always on my person, my liege
//No, that's not sexual innuendo
///Why do you ask?
 
2014-04-19 05:55:50 AM  

jtown: August11: Wordy, Subby.

Why "...it took for Shakespeare to write Macbeth..."

Why not "...is in Shakespeare's Macbeth..."

Or were you being funny?

Because words get used more than once.  I get a rough count of 18 words used in your post but your post has 21 words.

/didn't read the article.


Ah. Got it.

/didn't read it either
 
2014-04-19 05:59:02 AM  

maram500: doglover: When I am king, lawyers will have one page 12 point font, double spaced.

I nominate myself for His Majesty's Single-Page Overseer. Use of a bigger page than 8.5" x 11" is punishable by imprisonment as "attempting to defraud His Majesty."

/My ruler is always on my person, my liege
//No, that's not sexual innuendo
///Why do you ask?


I'm not paying to feed lawyers. A good horse whipping and boot in the butt out the official door of the courthouse, which will not be handicapped accessible, and thus have 13 steps symbolic of the 13 pillars of justice:

1. Don't be a dick, unless you really have to.
2-13. See 1.

Wheelchairs have to come in through the unofficial door to the courthouse, which is next to the official door, but not quite as official.
 
2014-04-19 05:59:33 AM  
If I was the benevolent-ish dictator Id make stuff that has so much legalese that even layers have trouble making heads or tails of it legally null and void and unenforcible.
 
2014-04-19 06:00:08 AM  

Oldiron_79: If I was the benevolent-ish dictator Id make stuff that has so much legalese that even layers have trouble making heads or tails of it legally null and void and unenforcible.


Lawyers.
 
2014-04-19 06:02:42 AM  
"So this money is 'in case sh*t'"


"Yeah"


"What if sh*t don't happen?"


"We keep your money."


"What if sh*t happens, but it ain't serious sh*t?"


"You pay for that.  It's called a deductible."


"And then what?"


"We keep your money."


"What if serious sh*t happens?"


"We have an entire room full of people who do nothing but try and figure out how how to not pay for it keep your money."


"And this is how much a month?"


"It's all there in your policy."


www.calbuzz.com
 
2014-04-19 06:05:58 AM  

Oldiron_79: If I was the benevolent-ish dictator Id make stuff that has so much legalese that even layers have trouble making heads or tails of it legally null and void and unenforcible.


Let's just get right to the heart of the matter:

Drivers drive. Swimmers swim. Teachers teach. Bakers bake. Brewers brew. Writers write. Singers sing. Dancers dance. etc, etc, etc....


Now say "lawyer" aloud.
 
2014-04-19 06:07:03 AM  

doglover: maram500: doglover: When I am king, lawyers will have one page 12 point font, double spaced.

I nominate myself for His Majesty's Single-Page Overseer. Use of a bigger page than 8.5" x 11" is punishable by imprisonment as "attempting to defraud His Majesty."

/My ruler is always on my person, my liege
//No, that's not sexual innuendo
///Why do you ask?

I'm not paying to feed lawyers. A good horse whipping and boot in the butt out the official door of the courthouse, which will not be handicapped accessible, and thus have 13 steps symbolic of the 13 pillars of justice:

1. Don't be a dick, unless you really have to.
2-13. See 1.

Wheelchairs have to come in through the unofficial door to the courthouse, which is next to the official door, but not quite as official.


I demand that my robes of office be a silk gown which ends two-and-one-half inches above the floor, is the color identified by Pantone 18-1763, and has black velvet facings. The official hours for my office shall be from 10am until 12pm; there shall be additional hours from 3pm until 5pm, but they shall not be as official. Any papers not stamped with Your Majesty's seal will be returned to the lawyer, who shall be fined ten pounds fifty plus postage and a 20oz soda. I shall have a separate room dedicated to the carrying out of sentences. Finally, my chief assistant shall be a very much attractive male whose uniform shall consist of royal blue short knickers and nothing else.
 
2014-04-19 06:09:16 AM  

maram500: doglover: When I am king, lawyers will have one page 12 point font, double spaced.

I nominate myself for His Majesty's Single-Page Overseer. Use of a bigger page than 8.5" x 11" is punishable by imprisonment as "attempting to defraud His Majesty."

/My ruler is always on my person, my liege
//No, that's not sexual innuendo
///Why do you ask?


i.imgur.com
 
2014-04-19 06:09:25 AM  

doglover: Oldiron_79: If I was the benevolent-ish dictator Id make stuff that has so much legalese that even layers have trouble making heads or tails of it legally null and void and unenforcible.

Let's just get right to the heart of the matter:

Drivers drive. Swimmers swim. Teachers teach. Bakers bake. Brewers brew. Writers write. Singers sing. Dancers dance. etc, etc, etc....


Now say "lawyer" aloud.


For those in doubt who think liar and lawyer don't rhyme: The original English accent. The area about rhymes starts are 4:47
 
2014-04-19 06:12:15 AM  

yukichigai: maram500: doglover: When I am king, lawyers will have one page 12 point font, double spaced.

I nominate myself for His Majesty's Single-Page Overseer. Use of a bigger page than 8.5" x 11" is punishable by imprisonment as "attempting to defraud His Majesty."

/My ruler is always on my person, my liege
//No, that's not sexual innuendo
///Why do you ask?

[i.imgur.com image 500x282]


It has been too damn long since I watched that. Muchas gracias.
 
2014-04-19 06:16:05 AM  
Another basic way we could fix the law is simply remove the protection of legalese and complex Latin jargon: ask juries and judges to base their judgement on the INTENT of the law, not the letter. Use some damn wisdom people.
 
2014-04-19 06:19:11 AM  
"First thing we do, is kill all the lawyers"

/fits the theme
 
2014-04-19 06:20:42 AM  

doglover: Another basic way we could fix the law is simply remove the protection of legalese and complex Latin jargon: ask juries and judges to base their judgement on the INTENT of the law, not the letter. Use some damn wisdom people.


And as long as most of the Congress and state legislatures are made up of LAWYERS that is never going to happen, although it would certainly be nice.
 
2014-04-19 06:28:29 AM  
Let me explain why this happens (according to my father who is a retired lawyer):-

A company provides a service. It's all quite straightforward. Then a customer farks with it, but because the thing wasn't warned against in the document, regardless of what we might see as reasonable, the customer wins the lawsuit, or can maybe delay payments for a while or something. As a result, lawyers at the company have to add a new small print clause.

It's the douchebags that create small print.
 
2014-04-19 06:31:15 AM  

doglover: Another basic way we could fix the law is simply remove the protection of legalese and complex Latin jargon: ask juries and judges to base their judgement on the INTENT of the law, not the letter. Use some damn wisdom people.


Hell yes, THIS^^^

I want a law passed that all contracts, any legal papers, must be written so that any person of reasonable intelligence can understand them.

And reasonable would be defined as any person capable enough to pass high school English.
 
2014-04-19 06:32:41 AM  
As disgusting as those bank and insurance documents may be, they pale next to most laws passed by Congress these days.  And laws are the concise version of regulations.  I don't recall the source but I recall something to the effect that the USDA's regulations on cauliflower were longer than the Bible.

We voted for the people who create those unwieldy laws.  They appointed those people who write the regulations.  Part of the regulations state that you have to do business with places like banks and insurance companies in order to have credit cards, savings accounts, drive a car, have health insurance, etc.  And a lot of the bank and insurance verbiage is contained because of government regulations.

You will receive an abundance of that which you tolerate.
 
2014-04-19 06:58:34 AM  
The reason they write those things so long is so that lawyers and technical writers won't lose their jobs. Without these unnecessarily lengthy documents, people would understand everything too easily. If people understand what they're signing up for, then there won't be too many lawsuits or problems because everyone will know what's expected of each other. The losers here are the lawyers and the technical writers.

Just imagine how farmers need trucks and fertilizers to grow crops. If you take away all the hard work where the only thing you need to do to grow your own vegetables and fruits is bury a seed wherever you want and leave it for a day, then there won't be a need for farmers, truck makers, and fertilizer merchants. Or maybe better yet, imagine a life where nobody needs porn anymore because people have developed strong imaginations that are enough to make them really believe they're having real life sex with anyone they want.
 
2014-04-19 07:00:17 AM  

Mr. Right: As disgusting as those bank and insurance documents may be, they pale next to most laws passed by Congress these days.  And laws are the concise version of regulations.  I don't recall the source but I recall something to the effect that the USDA's regulations on cauliflower were longer than the Bible.

We voted for the people who create those unwieldy laws.  They appointed those people who write the regulations.  Part of the regulations state that you have to do business with places like banks and insurance companies in order to have credit cards, savings accounts, drive a car, have health insurance, etc.  And a lot of the bank and insurance verbiage is contained because of government regulations.

You will receive an abundance of that which you tolerate.


I know people like to complain about this stuff - but what is the alternative?

English isn't a very precise language.  It's not like a formal mathematical proof or a logical expression.  Even things that seem incredibly trivial....aren't.
"You agree to pay $30 per month for our service"

Just focusing on what is literally said here (not what happens when the service isn't available or cancellation terms or fees/refunds) - just the $30 per month.  That can be interpreted so many ways, it's not even funny.  What does month mean in this context?  Is it a calendar month?  Do you pay the same in Feb with 28 days as another month with 31?  Do you treat a month as '30' days?

People might think I'm joking but, I'm not.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Day_count_convention

Day Count Convention is the financial industry's answer the above question.  And it's not a simple answer.  Not by a long shot.  There are DOZENS of equally valid ways of calculating time frames.  I won't bother doing a word count but it's staggering.  And we're just on the most basic of things here.
 
2014-04-19 07:15:11 AM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: People might think I'm joking but, I'm not.


You're right.  Much as we may hate it, there is a lot of what's in those documents that is necessary.  As farkeruk pointed out, several pages of legalese are brought about by users themselves who, through stupidity or malice, try to do what shouldn't be done and the bank or insurance company needs to protect itself.  Look at the pages of documents that accompany any appliance, including don't put your baby in the microwave.  That's only there because somebody tried it and sued when the results weren't good.

Just look at the law against murder.  How many definitions of murder are there, each with a set of contingencies, special circumstances, etc.  Or just look at how many arguments occur on Fark where the biggest disagreement is in the use of terms.  Not only is English imprecise, so is life.

One does wonder, sometimes, if we have brought this on ourselves by too many of us trying to skirt the law or gain some advantage over another or avoid responsibility in some way.

That doesn't mean we have to enjoy the legalese, just live with it.
 
2014-04-19 07:30:47 AM  
Tl;dr
 
2014-04-19 07:49:52 AM  

doglover: When I am king, lawyers will have one page 12 point font, double spaced.


Is his Majesty hiring?
 
2014-04-19 07:55:40 AM  
Conflicts between people can lead to violence and destruction. Generational feuds, retaliations, and revenge are bad for society. Pick up a history book or look at the news from third world countries. He'll, even large parts of Europe have constant fighting in the streets over social and political issues.  But largely not the case in America. Wonder why? Of course not, you're a dipshiat.

But the intelligent people know its better to decide our differences in a court room. Words and expressions have multiple meanings. People disagree on operative terms. Instead of fighting it out like some filthy Romanian, we go to a court room and settle the matter peacefully. Our Supreme Court decides major political issues and the people mostly live with their decisions. This takes a lot of words. Sorry if you're a tard and can't handle words with more than two syllables. Laws and legal documents are as long as they are for a purpose. And it's not to make lawyers who make you feel mentally inferior to make more money. It's because they need to be.

So every sock puppet alt that wants to be king for a day so they can bust out their crayon and make all legal documents one page can suck it. I'll happily live in a society where six figure mortgages have clearly defined, albeit complex clauses and I'll enjoy a society ruled by law.
 
2014-04-19 08:00:13 AM  

Champion of the Sun: Wonder why? Of course not, you're a dipshiat.But the intelligent people know



Ever notice that people who hinge their intellectual superiority and rectitude upon pronouncing other people to be idiots seldom have any?
 
2014-04-19 08:09:00 AM  

HindiDiscoMonster: farkeruk: Let me explain why this happens (according to my father who is a retired lawyer):-

A company provides a service. It's all quite straightforward. Then a customer farks with it, but because the thing wasn't warned against in the document, regardless of what we might see as reasonable, the customer wins the lawsuit, or can maybe delay payments for a while or something. As a result, lawyers at the company have to add a new small print clause.

It's the douchebags that create small print.

how right you are...

/most judges are lawyers... and therefore have no wisdom or common sense... that is why idiots win lawsuits.


Cases are usually decided by a jury, so you can't blame the judges. Similarly, lawyers don't sue people; clients sue people. It still comes back to the douchebags among us.
 
2014-04-19 08:12:19 AM  

HindiDiscoMonster: murder seems like a poor example... murder is simple... either you did or did not kill someone without defense of oneself or another. there is no reason to split hairs with 1st degree, 2nd degree, or hell... in some states 3rd degree and 4th degree believe it or not. it's simple binary... either you did (1) or you did not (0)... no need for 16 pages of legalese. if our judges actually applied common sense and wisdom, then there wouldn't be a set of laws in this country that rivals the sum of human scientific knowledge.


While I don't disagree that murder is pretty simple, every defense lawyer in the country would disagree with you.  And that's why we have 16 pages (I think your page count might be low) of legalese.  When judges try to apply common sense, the defense attorneys view that as grounds for an appeal.
 
2014-04-19 08:12:45 AM  

doglover: Another basic way we could fix the law is simply remove the protection of legalese and complex Latin jargon: ask juries and judges to base their judgement on the INTENT of the law, not the letter. Use some damn wisdom people.


Uhh the problem is judges  not going by the letter of the law, or in this case document.

A standard property insurance policy used to be 165 lines.

But what happens is you get to court a a judge makes up their own interpretation oustide of the obvious intent of the policy.. or sometimes just changes an obvious exclusion into coverage.

So then the insurance carriers lawyers need to add additional language to work around the new precident set by an idiot judge doing what he felt like.
 
2014-04-19 08:13:36 AM  

jtown: August11: Wordy, Subby.

Why "...it took for Shakespeare to write Macbeth..."

Why not "...is in Shakespeare's Macbeth..."

Or were you being funny?

Because words get used more than once.  I get a rough count of 18 words used in your post but your post has 21 words.

/didn't read the article.


Passive voice makes for more interesting reading, and is therefore a very valid choice when writing.
 
2014-04-19 08:31:26 AM  

farkeruk: Let me explain why this happens (according to my father who is a retired lawyer):-

A company provides a service. It's all quite straightforward. Then a customer farks with it, but because the thing wasn't warned against in the document, regardless of what we might see as reasonable, the customer wins the lawsuit, or can maybe delay payments for a while or something. As a result, lawyers at the company have to add a new small print clause.

It's the douchebags that create small print.


Which is why companies should offer two forms of the policy. One in non-legalese where people can actually read what they are going to be insured against in what circumstances and one in legalese that will be the basis of any dispute that might arise. An insurance policy might turn out to be 2 pages of text which spell out the things people are and aren't insured for while the legalese version spells out any and all exceptions and specify any and all terms.

For example a 'normal' version might say: You are covered for small accidents in the house such as knocking over a vase while vacuum cleaning for up to X dollars.

While the legalese version specifies what is considered small, what is considered an accident and what is considered to be a reasonable restitution.

People would read the normal version and thereby gain a better understanding of what they are signing. People won't read/understand the entire legalese version.
 
2014-04-19 08:34:03 AM  

DerAppie: People would read the normal version and thereby gain a better understanding of what they are signing. People won't read/understand the entire legalese version.


And a judge would determine since the wording on the simple version was broader, that coverage would apply in favor of the policy holder every time.
 
2014-04-19 08:51:16 AM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: English isn't a very precise language.  It's not like a formal mathematical proof or a logical expression.  Even things that seem incredibly trivial....aren't.
"You agree to pay $30 per month for our service"


That's a bad example though, because "months" are already well-defined in common English. There are twelve months in the year. We can count them and name them. Every time one of those things happens, you pay $30.

Yes, that means you pay slightly more for February. So what? The problem happened when some blowhard came along and started making a stink about it. For stuff like insurance or rent, just figure out the cost of the yearly term and divide that by twelve. The company can do that entirely on it's own and not have to bother the customer with a technical definition of "month".
 
2014-04-19 08:53:13 AM  

MugzyBrown: Uhh the problem is judges not going by the letter of the law, or in this case document.

A standard property insurance policy used to be 165 lines.

But what happens is you get to court a a judge makes up their own interpretation oustide of the obvious intent of the policy.. or sometimes just changes an obvious exclusion into coverage.


That's not a problem to me.

If you're gonna be the mob, ie insurance rackets, you're gonna lose court cases. DEAL WITH IT.

A piece of paper with so much fine print a professional contract lawyer can't make heads nor tails of it without a full weekend of study should be treated the same a handgun or other such forbidden item and simply not be allowed in or around courtrooms.
 
2014-04-19 09:28:23 AM  

MugzyBrown: DerAppie: People would read the normal version and thereby gain a better understanding of what they are signing. People won't read/understand the entire legalese version.

And a judge would determine since the wording on the simple version was broader, that coverage would apply in favor of the policy holder every time.


Just call the non-legalese version a "summary" or an "abridged version". Nobody should expect that to be conclusive. Not even a judge.

If they do it simply brings us right back to "douchebags create fine print".
 
2014-04-19 09:35:26 AM  
even the people that read don't fully understand the scope of the insurance contract, regardless if it is "fine print" or not.  There are five sections to a homeowners policy, and it's pretty linear and makes sense.

Broken down like this:
What is covered property?  i.e. not your neighbors stuff.  spells out contents, jewelry, sheds, fencing, trees, etc
What are perils insured against?  everything unless x, y, x or y, also z
What is excluded?  these things like flood, war, mfr defect
What additional coverages are there?  ahh, debris removal, mold, fire department surcharges, etc
What are the conditions?  how do losses get settled? what are my responsibilities under the policy?

they aren't terribly complex at all, however those that read still don't get it.  thats why they have agents and should ask questions
 
2014-04-19 09:55:03 AM  

farkeruk: Let me explain why this happens (according to my father who is a retired lawyer):-

A company provides a service. It's all quite straightforward. Then a customer farks with it, but because the thing wasn't warned against in the document, regardless of what we might see as reasonable, the customer wins the lawsuit, or can maybe delay payments for a while or something. As a result, lawyers at the company have to add a new small print clause.

It's the douchebags that create small print.


Silly Season's Axiom: 90% of the laws are written because of 10% of the people.

/ Patented, copyrighted and trademarked for your protection.
 
2014-04-19 10:00:46 AM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: Mr. Right: As disgusting as those bank and insurance documents may be, they pale next to most laws passed by Congress these days.  And laws are the concise version of regulations.  I don't recall the source but I recall something to the effect that the USDA's regulations on cauliflower were longer than the Bible.

We voted for the people who create those unwieldy laws.  They appointed those people who write the regulations.  Part of the regulations state that you have to do business with places like banks and insurance companies in order to have credit cards, savings accounts, drive a car, have health insurance, etc.  And a lot of the bank and insurance verbiage is contained because of government regulations.

You will receive an abundance of that which you tolerate.

I know people like to complain about this stuff - but what is the alternative?

English isn't a very precise language.  It's not like a formal mathematical proof or a logical expression.  Even things that seem incredibly trivial....aren't.
"You agree to pay $30 per month for our service"

Just focusing on what is literally said here (not what happens when the service isn't available or cancellation terms or fees/refunds) - just the $30 per month.  That can be interpreted so many ways, it's not even funny.  What does month mean in this context?  Is it a calendar month?  Do you pay the same in Feb with 28 days as another month with 31?  Do you treat a month as '30' days?

People might think I'm joking but, I'm not.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Day_count_convention

Day Count Convention is the financial industry's answer the above question.  And it's not a simple answer.  Not by a long shot.  There are DOZENS of equally valid ways of calculating time frames.  I won't bother doing a word count but it's staggering.  And we're just on the most basic of things here.


And then you have to quantify the definition of "service"...
 
2014-04-19 10:03:58 AM  

doglover: MugzyBrown: Uhh the problem is judges not going by the letter of the law, or in this case document.

A standard property insurance policy used to be 165 lines.

But what happens is you get to court a a judge makes up their own interpretation oustide of the obvious intent of the policy.. or sometimes just changes an obvious exclusion into coverage.

That's not a problem to me.

If you're gonna be the mob, ie insurance rackets, you're gonna lose court cases. DEAL WITH IT.

A piece of paper with so much fine print a professional contract lawyer can't make heads nor tails of it without a full weekend of study should be treated the same a handgun or other such forbidden item and simply not be allowed in or around courtrooms.


This is the reason why an elected, non-attorney judiciary is a really bad idea.

Situations arise that are outside the realm of reasonable foreseeability, so complicated documents are not per se a bad thing.
 
2014-04-19 10:22:27 AM  

DerAppie: Just call the non-legalese version a "summary" or an "abridged version". Nobody should expect that to be conclusive. Not even a judge.

If they do it simply brings us right back to "douchebags create fine print".


Yeah they´re called insurance proposals and they´re used everywhere by insurance brokers.  Any anbiguity in the proposal can bind an insurance company to coverage that wasn´t intended
 
2014-04-19 10:33:39 AM  

doglover: That's not a problem to me.

If you're gonna be the mob, ie insurance rackets, you're gonna lose court cases. DEAL WITH IT.

A piece of paper with so much fine print a professional contract lawyer can't make heads nor tails of it without a full weekend of study should be treated the same a handgun or other such forbidden item and simply not be allowed in or around courtrooms.


Insurance contracts are mandated to be written at an eighth grade reading level.  Think about that next time you feel like getting all 'rackety'.
 
2014-04-19 10:35:14 AM  
I dunno, subby. I think you can condense Macbeth into just "You're farked"
 
2014-04-19 10:51:18 AM  

doglover: A piece of paper with so much fine print a professional contract lawyer can't make heads nor tails of it without a full weekend of study


That´s because most lawyers are idiots outside of their very narrow focus.

Insurance policies aren´t that tough to read until you start getting into judge interpretations of words.
 
Displayed 50 of 61 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report