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(CNBC)   Amazon should buy Sears, claims business analyst whose head is too far up his anus   (cnbc.com) divider line 65
    More: Unlikely, Sears, Amazon, Too Far, call options, Fashion Institute of Technology, Brick and mortar business, Edward Lampert, VF Corp.  
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679 clicks; posted to Business » on 18 Apr 2014 at 1:44 AM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-17 10:43:26 PM  
Amazon? How about the USPS. They seem to be more aligned in customer service strategies.
 
2014-04-17 10:56:26 PM  

mr_a: Amazon? How about the USPS. They seem to be more aligned in customer service strategies.


I'd feel sorry for the postal workers, and it isn't a great job to begin with.
 
2014-04-17 10:58:40 PM  
Lampert ran the remains of America's flagship retailer into the dirt, and all I got was a series of jizz covered Sears lady underwear catalogs and an endless supply of dead Craftsman power tools.

Yeah, Jeff Bezos looks at that and thinks "ohh, baby, I remember those catalogs".
 
2014-04-17 11:43:36 PM  
Actually, with Amazon's reputation and the remnant of Sears' name cache and assets like Kenmore and Craftsman, this would be a fantastic way for Amazon to get into genuine retailing on the cheap. Considering that they will soon be faced with taxing their customers and taking the online price hit which negates their price advantage and shipping delay, it's not too much of a stretch.

As far as Craftsman goes, that's still a big asset, even if they are mostly made in China. A lifetime guarantee goes a long way, and the tools are still better than Kobalt or any other consumer-grade brand. Not everybody can afford to pay for Snap-On.
 
2014-04-17 11:49:50 PM  
"The acquisition becomes [Amazon CEO Jeff] Bezos' answer to omnichannel and the proven revenue synergy..."

i69.photobucket.com
 
2014-04-18 12:46:07 AM  
Because if it's one thing people who shop at Amazon want, it's paying local sales tax on top of shipping charges.
 
2014-04-18 12:49:53 AM  
I don't really get the appeal for Amazon in buying Sears.

I almost want to suggest that Sears just go all Two Guys and become the next Vornado, but most of the Sears locations I've seen don't seem to be sitting on prime real estate.
 
2014-04-18 12:56:07 AM  

syrynxx: Because if it's one thing people who shop at Amazon want, it's paying local sales tax on top of shipping charges.


Some of us already do, and willingly just to avoid local shops like Sears or Best Buy
 
2014-04-18 01:17:31 AM  
Sounds like the clarion call of someone who is desperately trying to unload some badly performing Sears stock.
 
2014-04-18 02:14:35 AM  

Adolf Oliver Nipples: As far as Craftsman goes, that's still a big asset, even if they are mostly made in China. A lifetime guarantee goes a long way, and the tools are still better than Kobalt or any other consumer-grade brand. Not everybody can afford to pay for Snap-On.


Yep. And not everyone can wait for the Snap-On truck to show up.
 
2014-04-18 02:36:33 AM  

Gig103: syrynxx: Because if it's one thing people who shop at Amazon want, it's paying local sales tax on top of shipping charges.

Some of us already do, and willingly just to avoid local shops like Sears or Best Buy


Fun fact: i needed a new phone battery last week.

Best buy, radio shack, and the sprint store all said they don't carry them in stock. As in never keep them on hand.


But i could order one through radio shack online and ship it to the store!

So two batteries for $20, a charger, and two day delivery with free shipping from amazon was the result. No wonder stores are failing: what little I wouldn't want to wait a week for is never there.
 
2014-04-18 04:14:55 AM  
24.media.tumblr.com

/let the thing burn
 
2014-04-18 05:38:25 AM  

Adolf Oliver Nipples: Actually, with Amazon's reputation and the remnant of Sears' name cache and assets like Kenmore and Craftsman, this would be a fantastic way for Amazon to get into genuine retailing on the cheap. Considering that they will soon be faced with taxing their customers and taking the online price hit which negates their price advantage and shipping delay, it's not too much of a stretch.

As far as Craftsman goes, that's still a big asset, even if they are mostly made in China. A lifetime guarantee goes a long way, and the tools are still better than Kobalt or any other consumer-grade brand. Not everybody can afford to pay for Snap-On.


Why would amazon want to saddle itself with 21k disgruntled employees and 858 locations mostly in dying suburban malls?
 
2014-04-18 06:11:43 AM  
"The acquisition becomes [Amazon CEO Jeff] Bezos' answer to omnichannel and the proven revenue synergy of consumers' ability to shop online and off; the convenience of proximity for pick up and returns; and facilitation of even greater delivery speed," Lewis wrote in his online newsletter, The Robin Report. "So just as Walmart's 4,500 stores double as distribution centers, so would Amazon's acquired Sears/Kmart stores."

Amazon already has lockers.

Look, no-one wants retail stores. They're incredibly inefficient compared to online retailing and only really exist now because of perishable goods and things that people need to try on, or see in the flesh.
 
2014-04-18 07:34:26 AM  

bdub77: Sounds like the clarion call of someone who is desperately trying to unload some badly performing Sears stock.


Yup. This analyst is trying to run a classic pump and dump scam.
 
2014-04-18 07:34:37 AM  

farkeruk: Amazon already has lockers.

Look, no-one wants retail stores. They're incredibly inefficient compared to online retailing and only really exist now because of perishable goods and things that people need to try on, or see in the flesh.


The only thing that might make sense would be for Amazon to buy an existing (and successful) grocery chain, since that's the one area of retail they aren't dominating.


fusillade762: "The acquisition becomes [Amazon CEO Jeff] Bezos' answer to omnichannel and the proven revenue synergy..."
[cockpunch.jpg]


What? Don't feel like playing a round of Buzzword Bingo?
 
NFA [TotalFark]
2014-04-18 07:40:21 AM  
Since Amazon has barely ever made a profit, how could they purchase Sears?  I guess Amazon could get investors to fund a losing proposition like Sears but how long could that really last?  How long are investors going to support Amazon's lack of profit?
 
2014-04-18 08:01:10 AM  

Adolf Oliver Nipples: Actually, with Amazon's reputation and the remnant of Sears' name cache and assets like Kenmore and Craftsman, this would be a fantastic way for Amazon to get into genuine retailing on the cheap. Considering that they will soon be faced with taxing their customers and taking the online price hit which negates their price advantage and shipping delay, it's not too much of a stretch.

As far as Craftsman goes, that's still a big asset, even if they are mostly made in China. A lifetime guarantee goes a long way, and the tools are still better than Kobalt or any other consumer-grade brand. Not everybody can afford to pay for Snap-On.


No.
 
2014-04-18 08:01:11 AM  

Gig103: syrynxx: Because if it's one thing people who shop at Amazon want, it's paying local sales tax on top of shipping charges.

Some of us already do, and willingly just to avoid local shops like Sears or Best Buy


This
 
2014-04-18 08:33:20 AM  

bdub77: Sounds like the clarion call of someone who is desperately trying to unload some badly performing Sears stock.


This^^
 
2014-04-18 08:44:52 AM  

syrynxx: Because if it's one thing people who shop at Amazon want, it's paying local sales tax on top of shipping charges.


It might be that way in a couple of years anyway
 
2014-04-18 09:19:40 AM  
Sure, if it's cheap enough.
Any acquisition is a good one if it's cheap enough.
I doubt that it is.
 
2014-04-18 09:46:42 AM  
Bezos is probably having a hearty laugh about this one.
 
2014-04-18 09:52:56 AM  
FTA:
Belus Capital Advisors analyst Brian Sozzi sounded a similar note.
"James Cash Penney has a better chance of rising from the grave and personally delivering a check to Edward Lampert to buy all of Sears than Amazon offering up even a bid for the company," he said.


I know saying this makes it obvious that I enjoy rubbernecking the demise of Sears a little too much, but sometimes I want to meet Brian Sozzi for a sweaty tryst in a K-Mart changing room.
 
2014-04-18 10:02:31 AM  

Adolf Oliver Nipples: As far as Craftsman goes, that's still a big asset, even if they are mostly made in China. A lifetime guarantee goes a long way, and the tools are still better than Kobalt or any other consumer-grade brand. Not everybody can afford to pay for Snap-On.


What makes you say Craftsman is better than Kobalt (Lowes) or Husky (Home Depot)?  I'm not disagreeing, I just want to know why you feel Craftsman is better.  I believe all 3 brands have lifetime guarantees on their non-powered hand tools.  I've actually been considering Kobalt or Husky for any further purchases.

/tool chest and rolling cabinet full of mostly Craftsman tools.
//several broken Craftsman U-joint pieces which I haven't seen in a Sears store in years.
 
2014-04-18 10:23:47 AM  
If Sears actually had stand-alone properties that Amazon could buy for additional local distribution centers or something I could see that.  Sears were massive and had tons of floor space.

But buying the actual company?  Why?  Amazon has no desire for their business, IP (if any) or physical goods.
 
2014-04-18 10:52:09 AM  
I could see it only if to turn most Sears into mostly storage space.... reduce the customer floor space to about a 1/3 of what it is in every store, make it mostly clothing (which is what most people want to see in person if anything... people are usually ok with getting Electronics or appliances just based on online photos), and let people pick up from the Sears/Amazon stores for free (even without Amazon Prime).
 
2014-04-18 10:53:47 AM  

Adolf Oliver Nipples: Actually, with Amazon's reputation and the remnant of Sears' name cache and assets like Kenmore and Craftsman, this would be a fantastic way for Amazon to get into genuine retailing on the cheap. Considering that they will soon be faced with taxing their customers and taking the online price hit which negates their price advantage and shipping delay, it's not too much of a stretch.

As far as Craftsman goes, that's still a big asset, even if they are mostly made in China. A lifetime guarantee goes a long way, and the tools are still better than Kobalt or any other consumer-grade brand. Not everybody can afford to pay for Snap-On.


I don't mind the delay so much. Rarely do I need something right this second. Amazon keeps me from having to search all over the place for an item. Like the toque wrench I needed a couple weeks back but couldn't find in the 3 places I looked.
 
2014-04-18 11:08:06 AM  

gingerjet: Why would amazon want to saddle itself with 21k disgruntled employees and 858 locations mostly in dying suburban malls?


Shh, you'll wake up the analysts. It's Friday, they're all hungover.
 
2014-04-18 11:25:16 AM  
Buy Sears?

Good luck finding a clerk to ring it up.
 
2014-04-18 11:26:18 AM  
Why the hell would Amazon want to incur that tax bill? Or should I say 36 new tax bills?
 
2014-04-18 11:29:36 AM  
Lambert ran sears on the teachings of Ayn Rand. He pitted each department against each other in a survival of the fittest. For some reason it led them all to fail.
 
2014-04-18 11:32:01 AM  
I still have a Kenmore/Sear mini-fridge that I bought right after college (2001, ugh) still runs like I charm and I recently converted it to a kegarator. If they still built quality like that I'd still shop there, but they really suck now and never have what I need in stock.

Amazon would be stupid to buy a company that is circling the drain the way Sears is.
 
2014-04-18 11:35:40 AM  

LarryDan43: Lambert ran sears on the teachings of Ayn Rand. He pitted each department against each other in a survival of the fittest. For some reason it led them all to fail.


That and at least when I worked there 20 years ago selling computers during college, they cared about 5% about your sales numbers, and about 95% about your Extended Warranty percentage (Ext Warr $/Product Sales $).
 
2014-04-18 11:36:43 AM  
The Sears store in my town is a stand alone store built in the 1950's or 1960's, far away from any malls or other major retailers.  It has a  huge parking lot.  So huge, they didn't bother to repave half of it when they did the other half, because even on the day before Christmas it's never that full (so the other half is full of weeds and cracked asphalt).  However, I've seen an aerial photo of the parking lot from not long after it opened and every single parking spot was full.  Shows how far they have fallen.
 
2014-04-18 11:42:54 AM  

Geotpf: The Sears store in my town is a stand alone store built in the 1950's or 1960's, far away from any malls or other major retailers.  It has a  huge parking lot.  So huge, they didn't bother to repave half of it when they did the other half, because even on the day before Christmas it's never that full (so the other half is full of weeds and cracked asphalt).  However, I've seen an aerial photo of the parking lot from not long after it opened and every single parking spot was full.  Shows how far they have fallen.


Well, to that extent, you are talking about shopping habits of the 50s/60s vs 2000's.... you can't even hardly compare that.   It is like the photos of the decaying and soon to be demolished huge malls.... they served their purpose at the time, but, even though there is a lot of supposedly "valuable" assets there in store fronts, already built structures, etc... obviously not enough for someone to keep using it.
 
2014-04-18 11:46:20 AM  
Funny, back in the day Sears was the Amazon of sales with their catalog sales. Had Sears embraced technology and put their catalog online in the beginning they would still be on top. I remember getting the Christmas catalog and making my wish list from it.
 
2014-04-18 11:49:09 AM  
Well, they better hurry up if they want to. Kmart and Sears are slowly closing down stores as their leases run out.
(Yeah, this is never going to happen).
 
2014-04-18 11:51:37 AM  

cig-mkr: Had Sears embraced technology and put their catalog online in the beginning they would still be on top.


Possibly. Isn't it still true that Amazon doesn't really turn a profit anyway, but exists solely upon a china-like model of grow grow grow?

Don't get me wrong, that is a fine model for Amazon. But it would be a bad model if Amazon had started as a Sears, and every time they took a loss on free shipping and tiny margins (along with the bonus of no sales tax) it cost them a sale from their own store.  For Sears to take up that route, they would be eating themselves.
 
2014-04-18 11:52:00 AM  

cig-mkr: Funny, back in the day Sears was the Amazon of sales with their catalog sales. Had Sears embraced technology and put their catalog online in the beginning they would still be on top. I remember getting the Christmas catalog and making my wish list from it.


Yup.  They actually discontinued the catalog right before the internet became really big.
 
2014-04-18 11:52:08 AM  

cig-mkr: Funny, back in the day Sears was the Amazon of sales with their catalog sales. Had Sears embraced technology and put their catalog online in the beginning they would still be on top. I remember getting the Christmas catalog and making my wish list from it.


That is funny though, because Sears was in reality one of the first stores "online", having a shopping space on Prodigy even in the early 90s, before there was really a "World Wide Web".   They just didn't embrace that enough going forward.   Shows you not just have to be early, but, also be committed.
 
2014-04-18 12:22:51 PM  

dletter: cig-mkr: Funny, back in the day Sears was the Amazon of sales with their catalog sales. Had Sears embraced technology and put their catalog online in the beginning they would still be on top. I remember getting the Christmas catalog and making my wish list from it.

That is funny though, because Sears was in reality one of the first stores "online", having a shopping space on Prodigy even in the early 90s, before there was really a "World Wide Web".   They just didn't embrace that enough going forward.   Shows you not just have to be early, but, also be committed.


Heck, they owned 50% of Prodigy itself (with IBM owning the other half).  Had they been run better, they could have been Amazon.  But, nope.
 
2014-04-18 12:31:58 PM  
Amazon should bury Sears

FTFY,  Subby
 
2014-04-18 12:32:13 PM  
It's only a matter of time when Sears, which is owned by Kmart, goes down the tubes anyway. Actually they both will go down the tube.
I'll miss the Craftsman tools, Diehard batteries, and Kenmore appliances, they had good bang for the buck.
 
2014-04-18 12:35:02 PM  

Geotpf: dletter: cig-mkr: Funny, back in the day Sears was the Amazon of sales with their catalog sales. Had Sears embraced technology and put their catalog online in the beginning they would still be on top. I remember getting the Christmas catalog and making my wish list from it.

That is funny though, because Sears was in reality one of the first stores "online", having a shopping space on Prodigy even in the early 90s, before there was really a "World Wide Web".   They just didn't embrace that enough going forward.   Shows you not just have to be early, but, also be committed.

Heck, they owned 50% of Prodigy itself (with IBM owning the other half).  Had they been run better, they could have been Amazon.  But, nope.


Did not realize that, they really did blow it.
 
2014-04-18 12:35:28 PM  

Adolf Oliver Nipples: As far as Craftsman goes, that's still a big asset, even if they are mostly made in China. A lifetime guarantee goes a long way, and the tools are still better than Kobalt or any other consumer-grade brand. Not everybody can afford to pay for Snap-On.


 My dad was an ASE Master Certified instructor and he never encouraged his students to buy Snap On. He used to say "You can buy 3 Craftsman for the price of one Snap On". This was more than a decade ago, though, and he has passed away so I dunno his current take on Craftsman. I doubt it's much better than Kobalt and wouldn't be surprised if it was the same Chinese mfg.
 
2014-04-18 12:35:47 PM  

cig-mkr: Funny, back in the day Sears was the Amazon of sales with their catalog sales. Had Sears embraced technology and put their catalog online in the beginning they would still be on top. I remember getting the Christmas catalog and making my wish list from it.


Making the decision to end their catalog division right before the Internet took off was what killed them.
 
2014-04-18 12:39:26 PM  

vartian: mr_a: Amazon? How about the USPS. They seem to be more aligned in customer service strategies.

I'd feel sorry for the postal workers, and it isn't a great job to begin with.


Worked at both. I'll take USPS THANKS
 
2014-04-18 01:01:43 PM  

NFA: Since Amazon has barely ever made a profit, how could they purchase Sears?  I guess Amazon could get investors to fund a losing proposition like Sears but how long could that really last?  How long are investors going to support Amazon's lack of profit?


node_charts_production.s3.amazonaws.com

Reinvesting all your profits back into the company, how does that work?
 
2014-04-18 01:11:18 PM  
Strictly from a stock perspective it's a losing proposition, no matter how cheap. Amazon relies on an overall upward trend of their stock price to refinance long term debt periodically. Add to that an "asset" that essentially at best causes stock price to stagnate and you've got a problem. This is without even thinking about how it would no longer be a "tech" company and have its P/E ratio compared to say Walmart.
 
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