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(LA Times)   Gabriel Garcia Marquez begins his first one hundred years of solitude   (latimes.com) divider line 61
    More: Sad, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Nobel Prize, minority rights, creativities, military dictatorship  
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6641 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Apr 2014 at 9:35 PM (14 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-04-17 06:57:40 PM
One of the few Nobel Prize for Literature award winners I have read. On the short list of Prize winning writers I had to read in class then read later by choice: Garcia Marquez, Sartre, Eliot. Maybe Kipling. I might have a Steinbeck unread on a shelf that I'll get to one of these decades.  And I read Churchill but not for class.

He just seemed to me too normal (despite the fantasy elements, or especially because of them) to win such an award.
 
2014-04-17 09:07:19 PM
His work was purely astounding. He has written some of the most profound literature I have ever read. He was already missed before he passed.
 
2014-04-17 09:36:07 PM
The world is a little poorer today.
 
2014-04-17 09:39:07 PM
Whenever I see someone reading '100 Years of Solitude' I feel a pang of jealousy that they might be reading it for the first time. That booked changed my view of writing and literature. I wish I could capture that feeling of wonder again.
 
2014-04-17 09:39:20 PM

Yaw String: The world is a little

much poorer today.

Dammit. Dammit so much.  It's raining flowers.
 
2014-04-17 09:40:05 PM
Rats ... "that book".
 
2014-04-17 09:42:42 PM
When I read 100 Years of Solitude it hit me like a thunderbolt. Truly one of the most incredible books I've ever read. Farewell, wonderful genius. You will be missed.
 
2014-04-17 09:42:52 PM
Okay. I will admit, I was not a fan of One Hundred Years of Solitude, but that may have been *when* I was forced to read it.

That being my junior year of  High school, specifically part of what felt like an endless parade of depressing books, with *nothing* to break them up.

All Quiet on the Western Front, As I Lay Dying, Of Mice and Men, Death of A Salesman (AND THEN THE MOVIE), Song of Solomon, Lord of the Flies, The Bluest Eye, 1984, Animal farm, One. After. The. Other. And I am a highly empathetic person, so this was... yeah.

Hell, I considered the Crucible *UPBEAT AND HOPEFUL* in it's ending when we read it, because, hey! He stuck to his principles! Bittersweet, but still not *Crushing nihlistic defeat* where everything was for naught and nothing mattered. (And I do still love the Crucible, perhaps because it still had that bit of a bright spot at the end. 'More Weight...' )

I really do think that high school year utterly ruined depressing endings for me. Bittersweet is OK and can be wonderful. But fark you, I am not reading The Bluest Eye again.

So I feel kind of bad, because most of my memories of his book are... kind of tainted by that whole endless litany of gloom and doom.
 
2014-04-17 09:44:57 PM
That said, it was a wonderfully *written* book, and it is always sad when a fantastic author dies. I am glad, at least, his family was able to be with him.
 
2014-04-17 09:49:03 PM
"One Hundred Years of Solitude" is a damn brilliant book, but I'm going to go ahead and mention how great "Love in the Time of Cholera". Thomas Pynchon wrote a really good review of it for the New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/1988/04/10/books/the-heart-s-eternal-vow.html
 
2014-04-17 09:49:24 PM
One Hundred Years of Solitude is one the books dearest to my heart, and stands with very few others on the shortest of short lists of my my favorite literary works. I read it in the summer of 2000, while living on the island of Nantucket, mainly in the quiet blooming courtyard beside the Atheneum. The book was a joy and a revelation, a sweaty, fecund, dark tangled jungle of a masterpiece, where wonder sprung forth from science and magic defined the status quo. What a joy to read, what a gift he gave to the world. I would love to read it again right now.
 
2014-04-17 09:52:36 PM
What a deprived upbringing I had. I've never read any of his stuff
 
2014-04-17 09:54:43 PM
:(

/right in the feels
 
2014-04-17 09:57:57 PM

ZAZ: One of the few Nobel Prize for Literature award winners I have read.


That's a decent list. I'd add Coetzee to the list. Waiting for the Barbarians is a brilliant book.
 
2014-04-17 10:00:56 PM
Well done farkers, couldn't have said it better myself.

A wonderful writer.
 
2014-04-17 10:01:37 PM
Now his widow is free to go to the true love of her life - a guy carrying a blue French horn.
 
2014-04-17 10:04:12 PM
so long, sr. marquez

100 years of solitude is one of the best books ever written by anyone. ever. anywhere.
 
2014-04-17 10:11:17 PM
This will go unnoticed by far too many people.

Rest in peace, beautiful author man.
 
2014-04-17 10:13:31 PM

ZAZ: He just seemed to me too normal (despite the fantasy elements, or especially because of them) to win such an award.


It's different reading it in Spanish. He's actually pretty difficult to read because of his phrasing and his use of local and regional words. I'd have to put Cien Años down often just to rub my head a bit. I've never tried to read the English translations.
 
2014-04-17 10:13:46 PM
Don't whine over the passing of an 87 year old man. Celebrate, damn it.
 
2014-04-17 10:14:12 PM
Just adding to the praise. 100 YoS & Love in the Time of Cholera are stalwarts.

I think he was the first non-white author I had read while forming a young idea of why I liked to read or what I thought made good fiction. He certainly opened my mind-doors in regards to what a book could be and how an author can will you to see it.

\unique
 
2014-04-17 10:18:03 PM

ZAZ: One of the few Nobel Prize for Literature award winners I have read. On the short list of Prize winning writers I had to read in class then read later by choice: Garcia Marquez, Sartre, Eliot. Maybe Kipling. I might have a Steinbeck unread on a shelf that I'll get to one of these decades.  And I read Churchill but not for class.

He just seemed to me too normal (despite the fantasy elements, or especially because of them) to win such an award.


Mine is a pathetically short list: Kipling, Shaw, Mann, Lewis, O'Neill, Hesse, Faulkner, Hemingway, Steinbeck, Marquez, Golding, Grass. I should work on that, but I probably won't. I have almost 600 books on my Nook, and the only Nobel winner I have on it is Kipling, mostly because Project Gutenberg has all of his works for free. I love PG.
 
2014-04-17 10:18:50 PM
I read that book and there's some sick pedophilic stuff going on in there.
 
2014-04-17 10:19:24 PM

NateAsbestos: This will go unnoticed by far too many people.



There's an original Botero painting, worth a fortune, in the Tucson Museum of Art, and it's not even one of the main attractions. It's just sort of in a corner of the museum, completely understated. The people who care will seek out and find beauty and great art.
 
2014-04-17 10:19:40 PM

ecmoRandomNumbers: ZAZ: He just seemed to me too normal (despite the fantasy elements, or especially because of them) to win such an award.

It's different reading it in Spanish. He's actually pretty difficult to read because of his phrasing and his use of local and regional words. I'd have to put Cien Años down often just to rub my head a bit. I've never tried to read the English translations.


This.  I enjoyed it, but as a 16 year old student reading it in Spanish it was a bit tough.
 
2014-04-17 10:19:44 PM

NateAsbestos: This will go unnoticed by far too many people.

Rest in peace, beautiful author man.


He is actually trending on Twitter
#GraciasGabo
#RIPGabrielGarciaMarquez

Which in its own sad way is great to see.  I'm glad the world is taking notice.
 
2014-04-17 10:24:37 PM
Was it cholera?
 
2014-04-17 10:24:41 PM

NateAsbestos: This will go unnoticed by far too many people.

Rest in peace, beautiful author man.


Meh - was left in my apartment by some douchey guy - it's all written in Mexican.

/Or was that Neruda?
//Yeah, it's a sad farking day today.
 
2014-04-17 10:28:21 PM
First time I teared up at the passing of an author since Dr. Seuss. I've owned multiple copies of 100 Years over the decades. But if you think that's too tame, try Autumn of the Patriarch. It's like 100 Years of Solitude on nightmare mode.
 
2014-04-17 10:40:23 PM

ecmoRandomNumbers: NateAsbestos: This will go unnoticed by far too many people.


There's an original Botero painting, worth a fortune, in the Tucson Museum of Art, and it's not even one of the main attractions. It's just sort of in a corner of the museum, completely understated. The people who care will seek out and find beauty and great art.


Because Colombians are drug lords and coffee growers
 
2014-04-17 10:41:34 PM
Love in the Time of Cholera is a great read too
 
2014-04-17 10:42:38 PM
Great man. ¡Viva Colombia!
 
2014-04-17 10:44:50 PM
A great loss. An amazing talent. The best way I can describe his work is to say: mesmerizing.


(And, speaking of writing, my headline was better. Bad show, mods)
 
2014-04-17 10:51:07 PM
I wish I knew who this was. I was GOING to find out by reading the article, but the Tardmitter, adding one MORE means by which he would not be able to qualify for a Nobel Prize, FAILED to figure out how to submit a link to Fark that would enable non-subscibers to find out who this person was.
 
2014-04-17 11:06:46 PM
too bad we went with a pretty lame 100 years of solitude reference when the greenlit should have used a  Chronicle of a Death Foretoldreference instead.
 
2014-04-17 11:28:59 PM

Omahawg: so long, sr. marquez

100 years of solitude is one of the best books ever written by anyone. ever. anywhere.


I could not say it any better than that. It has shaped my life. I'm more than half way through the list of reading everything he's ever written. We are richer for having had him here among us for awhile, leaving us with those transcendent words before he left us on another magical journey.
 
2014-04-17 11:31:28 PM

Colin O'Scopy: I wish I knew who this was. I was GOING to find out by reading the article, but the Tardmitter, adding one MORE means by which he would not be able to qualify for a Nobel Prize, FAILED to figure out how to submit a link to Fark that would enable non-subscibers to find out who this person was.


The LA Times paywall is laughably easy to get around. In IE, just delete your browsing history. In Firefox, clear cached web content and then clear recent history.
 
2014-04-17 11:34:03 PM
"Mierda,"

(La ultima palabra de "El Coronel no tiene quien le escriba")

The Final words that the Coronel utters in "El Coronel no tiene quien le escriba."
 
2014-04-17 11:35:50 PM

Danger Avoid Death: Colin O'Scopy: I wish I knew who this was. I was GOING to find out by reading the article, but the Tardmitter, adding one MORE means by which he would not be able to qualify for a Nobel Prize, FAILED to figure out how to submit a link to Fark that would enable non-subscibers to find out who this person was.

The LA Times paywall is laughably easy to get around. In IE, just delete your browsing history. In Firefox, clear cached web content and then clear recent history.


Ahhh or you could try this new thing called Google. I'm pretty sure it will tell you who he was.
 
2014-04-17 11:36:28 PM
He believed in God and the supernatural, so maybe he's beginning his first 100 years of whatever the hell he wants.
 
2014-04-18 12:54:16 AM

ecmoRandomNumbers: ZAZ: He just seemed to me too normal (despite the fantasy elements, or especially because of them) to win such an award.

It's different reading it in Spanish. He's actually pretty difficult to read because of his phrasing and his use of local and regional words. I'd have to put Cien Años down often just to rub my head a bit. I've never tried to read the English translations.


I have read it in both languages, and it is far better in Spanish than in English.

However, it is of the those books that while you can enjoy it a surface level, you need to be able to read it in Spanish, and understand pure spanish, and also know more about the Colombian culture than cocaine and Sofia Vergara.

Same thing with Confedaracy for Dunces.  Unless you are from New Orleans, 80% of the book is is lost.
 
2014-04-18 12:59:21 AM
:(
que tragedia.
QEPD.
 
2014-04-18 01:03:41 AM
I had read about his declining health several years ago, but this was still a sad story to read.

And on a different front, I recently read a couple of books written by Amy Tan; "Saving Fish From Drowning" and "Joy Luck Club" Her style really made me think of Marquez, as the stories are somewhat normal with some odd, surreal aspects that make them very intense.
 
2014-04-18 01:29:57 AM
Glad to see I'm in good company here.
100 Years of Solitude is the book I'd take with me if I was only able to have one book to read for the rest of my life. (Which anyone who's seen my book collection would know is saying a lot)
I reread it ever year or two. It's looking like that time has come around again... though I'm not sure I have a copy anymore. They tend to get worn out or lent out pretty regularly.
 
2014-04-18 01:37:14 AM

wildcardjack: Don't whine over the passing of an 87 year old man. Celebrate, damn it.


Hot farking damn! A old writer kick the mother mother farking bucket! Salsa and whores for everybody! Let's paaaaarrtay!
 
2014-04-18 01:56:25 AM
Came to say what everyone else said. That book may be the only one from college I actually still think about to this day. RIP
 
2014-04-18 03:12:45 AM
I recommend Leaf Storm to those who have not read Gabriel Garcia Marquez before and who may be hesitant about tackling the long novel One Hundred Years of Solitude.

Leaf Storm is a collection of Marquez short stories of magical realism and is a good introduction to that literary genre. For a student of modern writing this collection is as essential as Nine Stories by Salinger.

A Very Old Man With Enormous Wings,one of the collected stories, will either win you over to magical realism for good, or put you off. Warning: You may have a life changing experience.

Another way to creep up on One Hundred Years of Solitude is to read The Incredible and Sad Tale of Innocent Erendira and Her Heartless Grandmother.Extracted from One Hundred Years of Solitude, it's not that long, so prepare to have your socks blown off in novella form. There is no way, in fact, that you can prepare for Innocent Erendira. Your life will be changed.

However you approach Marquez (and you should) bring an open heart and he will fill it up.
 
2014-04-18 03:39:17 AM

red5ish: However you approach Marquez (and you should) bring an open heart and he will fill it up.


That was a beautiful sentiment. :>)
 
2014-04-18 03:44:34 AM
Working my way through this http://thegreatestbooks.org/ reading list. I started Proust this week. I am looking forward to One Hundred Years of Solitude a few spots down. Had heard he was in poor health and am saddened by his passing.
 
2014-04-18 04:36:39 AM
The first in the line is tied to a tree and the last is being eaten by ants.

Love in the Time of Cholera is also a wild read, especially for the cultural value. I've never been to South America so it was interesting to see how life was (at least through the author's eyes) in that part of the world during that period.
 
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