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(Legal Examiner)   Flesh eating baby tarballs. It's not Syfy, it's BP   (neworleans.legalexaminer.com) divider line 62
    More: Scary, Northwest Florida, Escambia County, oil products, pollution  
•       •       •

8886 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Apr 2014 at 2:10 PM (35 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



62 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-04-17 02:11:12 PM  
Yeah, you can't call them that anymore.
 
2014-04-17 02:16:20 PM  
Maybe my reading comprehension is bad, but I read the headline as meaning that some flesh is eating something called baby tarballs.

"Flesh-eating tarballs" might be better (?)
 
2014-04-17 02:18:02 PM  
That's a good name for a punk band.
 
2014-04-17 02:22:20 PM  
BP Gulf Americans is the politically correct term.
 
2014-04-17 02:25:47 PM  
www.7-zip.org

can probably fix that
 
hej
2014-04-17 02:26:16 PM  
With helpful pic of what a tarbaby may look like.
 
2014-04-17 02:27:08 PM  

probesport: Yeah, you can't call them that anymore.


Wow.  Just wow.  Favorited.
 
2014-04-17 02:27:30 PM  
I prefer full grown debs.
 
2014-04-17 02:31:54 PM  
You have to be pretty delusional to believe that a spill that lasted from April 10 - August and dumped 205.8 million gallons of oil into the gulf is just going to up and disappear.
 
2014-04-17 02:32:28 PM  
Oh, is that what Wil's new show is called?
 
2014-04-17 02:32:54 PM  

elev8meL8r: [www.7-zip.org image 110x63]

can probably fix that


well played...
 
2014-04-17 02:33:22 PM  
So, the Vibrio infection rate was on the increase in the Gulf of Mexico before the BP disaster.
And no real increase in Vibrio infection rate after the BP disaster.
So, let's blame BP to get them to worry about the tarballs.
2/10

/info from the Chron article from 2011 that was linked in the original trolling for money article.
//if you're going to troll for money, get good data.
 
2014-04-17 02:36:03 PM  
TFA: "While the media and public believe that the effects of BP's Deepwater Horizon Blowout and Oil Spill have been largely eradicated,"

I think it's more like "the media and public have lost any interest in BP's Deepwater Horizon Blowout and Oil Spill."
If you did a poll asking whether the disaster was *actually* cleaned up and/or safe, you'd probably find most people *don't* think the threat has been largely eradicated.
They just don't really care.
 
2014-04-17 02:36:10 PM  

probesport: Yeah, you can't call them that anymore.


Tud-ball is still acceptable?
 
2014-04-17 02:39:11 PM  
Oh good lord. Anyone who has lived near a beach where there is any shipping traffic within several hundred miles can tell you that tar balls wash up on the beach all the time. There is no what of knowing whether these tar balls are from the Deep Water Horizon spill or not, since leaky oil rigs and tankers are all over the Gulf. Tar balls on Gulf beaches have been common for several decades.
 
2014-04-17 02:44:17 PM  
I read that five times before I realized it didn't say Tard Balls.
 
2014-04-17 02:45:53 PM  
Nobody wants balls in their mouth.
 
2014-04-17 02:46:05 PM  

ringersol: TFA: "While the media and public believe that the effects of BP's Deepwater Horizon Blowout and Oil Spill have been largely eradicated,"

I think it's more like "the media and public have lost any interest in BP's Deepwater Horizon Blowout and Oil Spill."
If you did a poll asking whether the disaster was *actually* cleaned up and/or safe, you'd probably find most people *don't* think the threat has been largely eradicated.
They just don't really care.


This. You have until the end of a news cycle to fix a problem, and if you don't? Oh well.
 
2014-04-17 02:46:56 PM  

Looks at the pics on TFA..that's not a tar ball.


THIS is a tar ball...Padre Island National Seashore.




i134.photobucket.com
 
2014-04-17 02:47:21 PM  
But they're baby tarballs, so it's cute.
 
2014-04-17 02:48:01 PM  

JackieRabbit: Oh good lord. Anyone who has lived near a beach where there is any shipping traffic within several hundred miles can tell you that tar balls wash up on the beach all the time. There is no what of knowing whether these tar balls are from the Deep Water Horizon spill or not, since leaky oil rigs and tankers are all over the Gulf. Tar balls on Gulf beaches have been common for several decades.


Yep.  Galveston Island doesn't have a great beach. People know this. The mud and silt from the Mississippi and the Sabine are not helpful and that's in a pristine state.  But also down current from the Port of Houston traffic, means any ship gets to dump their bilge water and leftover scum from their fuel tanks just offshore.  It's better now, but it used to be pretty bad. I did some trenching work in school on Galveston ("How are beaches made? Let's look at Galveston" and other boring and mosquito filled fun day trips), and the tar balls are occasionally found a meter deep under sand - the product of oil seeps from before the near offshore oil fields were ever developed.

The good news for the upper Florida coast is that much of the tar balls are being covered by sand. There will be remnants of the oil under the sand for many generations. This is a fact. This is good news, because very few critters have to deal with the degraded oil (tar) balls.
 
2014-04-17 02:50:44 PM  

Maud Dib: Looks at the pics on TFA..that's not a tar ball.
THIS is a tar ball...Padre Island National Seashore.


[i134.photobucket.com image 679x1024]


I'll give you really good odds I know where that one came from:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ixtoc_I_oil_spill
 
2014-04-17 02:51:01 PM  

Cold_Sassy: You have to be pretty delusional to believe that a spill that lasted from April 10 - August and dumped 205.8 million gallons of oil into the gulf is just going to up and disappear.


I have a cousin, though marriage, that worked for a contractor who surveyed a section of the Gulf after the spill. That's exactly what happened. Turns out there are thousands of natural oil seeps throughout the gulf and bacteria have been chomping on the oil for millions of years.

His advice, don't eat any gulf bivalves for a few years.
 
2014-04-17 02:53:59 PM  

Maud Dib: Looks at the pics on TFA..that's not a tar ball.
THIS is a tar ball...Padre Island National Seashore.


[i134.photobucket.com image 679x1024]


that's not a tar ball, that's a rock.

/I see you've played tar bally/rocky before.
 
2014-04-17 02:54:23 PM  
Could these flesh-eating bacteria be the same ones which were supposedly consuming the oil?
 
2014-04-17 02:55:54 PM  

SVenus: Maud Dib: Looks at the pics on TFA..that's not a tar ball.
THIS is a tar ball...Padre Island National Seashore.


[i134.photobucket.com image 679x1024]

I'll give you really good odds I know where that one came from:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ixtoc_I_oil_spill


I lived in Corpus Christi when it happened. It was horrible.

Gov. Bill Clements (R-Dumbass) "There's no use crying over spilled milk. Let's don't get excited over this thing. What we need is a good hurricane."
 
2014-04-17 02:56:28 PM  

Cold_Sassy: You have to be pretty delusional to believe that a spill that lasted from April 10 - August and dumped 205.8 million gallons of oil into the gulf is just going to up and disappear.


I moved to Kodiak in late summer 1989.  There was still 6 inches of sludge under the rocks at the tip of the penninsula out past the refuel docks for the cutters.  Without any human interaction after the half ass "cleanup" that sludge was gone by the time the Gulf War was over.  Not even 2 years and it was all gone. 

Nature has a way of cleaning up organics.  This too will vanish.
 
2014-04-17 02:58:34 PM  

Maud Dib: Looks at the pics on TFA..that's not a tar ball.
THIS is a tar ball...Padre Island National Seashore.


[i134.photobucket.com image 679x1024]


The tar balls shown in the FA were degraded. Tar balls first harden and then break down as they degrade.
 
2014-04-17 02:58:40 PM  

big pig peaches: Cold_Sassy: You have to be pretty delusional to believe that a spill that lasted from April 10 - August and dumped 205.8 million gallons of oil into the gulf is just going to up and disappear.

I have a cousin, though marriage, that worked for a contractor who surveyed a section of the Gulf after the spill. That's exactly what happened. Turns out there are thousands of natural oil seeps throughout the gulf and bacteria have been chomping on the oil for millions of years.

His advice, don't eat any gulf bivalves for a few years.


I haven't eaten any seafood since that happened, mostly because I've always hated it anyway ;)
 
2014-04-17 03:02:08 PM  

JackieRabbit: Oh good lord. Anyone who has lived near a beach where there is any shipping traffic within several hundred miles can tell you that tar balls wash up on the beach all the time. There is no what of knowing whether these tar balls are from the Deep Water Horizon spill or not, since leaky oil rigs and tankers are all over the Gulf. Tar balls on Gulf beaches have been common for several decades.


And they are great for bon fires.
 
2014-04-17 03:02:27 PM  

big pig peaches: Cold_Sassy: You have to be pretty delusional to believe that a spill that lasted from April 10 - August and dumped 205.8 million gallons of oil into the gulf is just going to up and disappear.

I have a cousin, though marriage, that worked for a contractor who surveyed a section of the Gulf after the spill. That's exactly what happened. Turns out there are thousands of natural oil seeps throughout the gulf and bacteria have been chomping on the oil for millions of years.

His advice, don't eat any gulf bivalves for a few years.


They monitor oyster reefs pretty closely for algae and bacteria. Galveston Bay is extremely prolific for oysters, but the oyster season there just got shut down six weeks early for bacteria because the water got too salty. A dry winter does that. That said, Most of the approved areas of Galveston Bay is rather sheltered from the worst of the incoming ship crap dumping and oil and gas work.
Map
 
2014-04-17 03:08:08 PM  
Are any of those tar balls from the annual natural seepage of 100,000 tons of oil into the Gulf?
 
2014-04-17 03:16:47 PM  
Free hydrocarbons? California is paved in gold and the gulf liquid gold washes upon the shore! Whoa! What a great coontry!
 
2014-04-17 03:23:32 PM  
Just feed them poisoned grain.  Problem solved.
 
2014-04-17 03:26:20 PM  

JackieRabbit: Oh good lord. Anyone who has lived near a beach where there is any shipping traffic within several hundred miles can tell you that tar balls wash up on the beach all the time. There is no what of knowing whether these tar balls are from the Deep Water Horizon spill or not, since leaky oil rigs and tankers are all over the Gulf. Tar balls on Gulf beaches have been common for several decades.


The gulf coast tar balls are documented back hundreds of years and occur naturally.
 
2014-04-17 03:29:30 PM  

probesport: Yeah, you can't call them that anymore.


Awesome. Favorited.
 
2014-04-17 03:35:57 PM  

probesport: Yeah, you can't call them that anymore.


Another word hijacked by everything is racist liberalism.
 
2014-04-17 03:37:02 PM  

Cold_Sassy: You have to be pretty delusional to believe that a spill that lasted from April 10 - August and dumped 205.8 million gallons of oil into the gulf is just going to up and disappear.


Dont give David Copperfield new ideas.
 
2014-04-17 03:44:36 PM  
So.
Well is sabotaged, to provide reason for usage of corexit, which was used, in spite of the loudly preferred oil absorbing properties of Strawgrass.
The Corexit is used, only to end up with it's by-product being....  what?
Flesh-eating bacteria incubating tarballs?


By  myestimation, somebody,  somewhere,  had to know this in advance.

And so begins the investigation into the origins of Corexit.


Which you are all doing, right?
 
2014-04-17 03:53:05 PM  

JackieRabbit: Oh good lord. Anyone who has lived near a beach where there is any shipping traffic within several hundred miles can tell you that tar balls wash up on the beach all the time. There is no what of knowing whether these tar balls are from the Deep Water Horizon spill or not, since leaky oil rigs and tankers are all over the Gulf. Tar balls on Gulf beaches have been common for several decades.


Yep, stepped in them a few times on Pensacola Beach back in the 90's. They never ate my feet though.
 
2014-04-17 04:03:44 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: Cold_Sassy: You have to be pretty delusional to believe that a spill that lasted from April 10 - August and dumped 205.8 million gallons of oil into the gulf is just going to up and disappear.

I moved to Kodiak in late summer 1989.  There was still 6 inches of sludge under the rocks at the tip of the penninsula out past the refuel docks for the cutters.  Without any human interaction after the half ass "cleanup" that sludge was gone by the time the Gulf War was over.  Not even 2 years and it was all gone.
Nature has a way of cleaning up organics.  This too will vanish.


img.fark.net
 
2014-04-17 04:16:25 PM  
Flesh eating baby tarballs. It's not Syfy, it's BP.
There, much better.
 
2014-04-17 04:17:30 PM  
OMG!  It's a Skin of Evil!

i.imgur.com
 
2014-04-17 04:20:04 PM  
I thought tar balls were a daily occurrence before the oil spill, because of underwater oil seeps?
 
2014-04-17 04:22:14 PM  
There should already be at least two people fighting over the origins of corexit, in this thread, right now.

People: Where did it come from?
 
2014-04-17 04:25:39 PM  
Ball-eating tar babies are far more scarier.
 
2014-04-17 04:30:07 PM  

meat0918: I thought tar balls were a daily occurrence before the oil spill, because of underwater oil seeps?


Shut up.  Just shut up.  You and your facts.  Goddammit we're supposed to be panicking
 
2014-04-17 04:36:51 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: meat0918: I thought tar balls were a daily occurrence before the oil spill, because of underwater oil seeps?

Shut up.  Just shut up.  You and your facts.  Goddammit we're supposed to be panicking


Yes they are.

But the BP spill is still impacting the coastal wetlands in Louisiana and Mississippi.  The spilled oil is still killing grasses and helping to erode the already fragile marshlands.
 
2014-04-17 04:57:15 PM  

JackieRabbit: There is no what of knowing whether these tar balls are from the Deep Water Horizon spill


Actually, there is.  It's called petroleum fingerprinting.
 
2014-04-17 04:58:18 PM  
easy peasy

tar -zxvf baby.tar baby
 
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