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(Geek.com)   Yeah, those expensive cables are just a ripoff... how fast did you say? Shut up and take my money   (geek.com) divider line 66
    More: Spiffy, optical fiber cable, SATA, throughput  
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7433 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Apr 2014 at 8:40 PM (14 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-16 08:11:48 PM
Corning's new optical USB 3.0 cables

The cookware company??
 
2014-04-16 08:17:28 PM

fusillade762: Corning's new optical USB 3.0 cables

The cookware company??


They also make the glass used in most smartphones.
 
2014-04-16 08:24:11 PM

fusillade762: Corning's new optical USB 3.0 cables

The cookware company??


They make glass.  Fiber optic cables are made of glass.
 
2014-04-16 08:44:37 PM

fusillade762: Corning's new optical USB 3.0 cables

The cookware company??


Cookware is a minor sideline for Corning. Odds are, they also made your car windshield... and your front window... and the insulation in your walls.
 
2014-04-16 08:47:01 PM
They also make fiberglass isolation, the pink foam that gets into your skin and itches for a few days.
 
2014-04-16 08:50:41 PM

fusillade762: Corning's new optical USB 3.0 cables

The cookware company??


They sold the cookware division in 1998 (other than an 8% interest in the divested properties). Think high end glass, labware, and telecommunications among other business interests.
 
2014-04-16 08:54:19 PM
The USB 3.0 spec says that USB 3.0 cables have a max throughput of 5Gbps, so yay, a very expensive cable that lives up to the spec

/IIRC, USB 3.1 doubles the throughput to 10Gbps
 
2014-04-16 08:54:27 PM
That's ridiculous.

Anyone who knows physics knows that glass can't conduct electricity.
 
2014-04-16 08:57:23 PM
Well, that's all covered in the article. Now make it go as far as the Thunderbolt cable
 
2014-04-16 09:06:19 PM
How FAR did you say? Shut up and take my money.
 
2014-04-16 09:12:32 PM

SpdrJay: That's ridiculous.

Anyone who knows physics knows that glass can't conduct electricity.


Maybe not, but don't need electricity if you can conduct the Light.
 
2014-04-16 09:23:37 PM

Mantour: They also make fiberglass isolation, the pink foam that gets into your skin and itches for a few days.


Fiberglass what?
 
2014-04-16 09:34:30 PM

ClavellBCMI: fusillade762: Corning's new optical USB 3.0 cables

The cookware company??

Cookware is a minor sideline for Corning. Odds are, they also made your car windshield... and your front window... and the insulation in your walls.


Cookware WAS a sideline. They handed off the Pyrex Cookware line to some schmucks who stopped making it with borosilicate glass. You can spot the inferior soda-lime glass ones because they have a greenish tinge from iron in the mix.

Anyhow. What sort of external drive is capable of delivering on the performance? You aren't going to be able to take advantage of this with anything less than solid state, and once you're into those $110 for a cable will be the cheapest part.
 
2014-04-16 09:40:24 PM

the_sidewinder: The USB 3.0 spec says that USB 3.0 cables have a max throughput of 5Gbps, so yay, a very expensive cable that lives up to the spec


The USB 3.0 CONTROLLER has a max throughput of 5Gbps, your keyboard wire cannot sustain that. It is also capable of maintaining speed over long distances (30m for the USB 3.0 cable), which cannot be accomplished with copper cables. Long runs of copper suffer from resistive losses and interference from outside EMR sources.

If the normal consumer market doesn't push enough volume to make this profitable, military contractors will pick up the slack. There is ZERO capacitive induction in fiber cable, no risk of source/device not being on a common ground, no extra RF shielding concerns when running fiber through bulkheads/firewalls...
 
2014-04-16 09:42:06 PM
Just to emphasize what failmitter has predictably failed to mention. The 5 Gbps speed is standard for USB 3 and can be achieved with a $5 copper cable. The distance of 30m is a neat trick that warrants $110 and then some.
 
2014-04-16 09:52:36 PM
No thanks. I'll stick to thunderbolt for my overpriced high speed connections.
 
2014-04-16 09:53:17 PM

LoneVVolf: the_sidewinder: The USB 3.0 spec says that USB 3.0 cables have a max throughput of 5Gbps, so yay, a very expensive cable that lives up to the spec

The USB 3.0 CONTROLLER has a max throughput of 5Gbps, your keyboard wire cannot sustain that. It is also capable of maintaining speed over long distances (30m for the USB 3.0 cable), which cannot be accomplished with copper cables. Long runs of copper suffer from resistive losses and interference from outside EMR sources.

If the normal consumer market doesn't push enough volume to make this profitable, military contractors will pick up the slack. There is ZERO capacitive induction in fiber cable, no risk of source/device not being on a common ground, no extra RF shielding concerns when running fiber through bulkheads/firewalls...


You actually could end up with a static burst issue, if one end of the cable gets a positive voltage reference somehow, and the other gets neutral or negative (say a few hundred volts). Potential difference, even if the cable itself is nonconductive? I've never worked with fiber in a high-voltage setting, we've always used copper, and the fiber lines were isolated 'just in case'.

But this was in substation and switchgear, like 100+ KV at the low end.
 
2014-04-16 09:55:38 PM
IIRC, you can chain together a few 12' cables with powered hubs to get long USB cable runs.
 
2014-04-16 09:59:05 PM
Do they drop the 7th line in between the media converters?
 
2014-04-16 10:00:30 PM
I'll wait for the superior Monster Cable version.
 
2014-04-16 10:05:50 PM
SAS/SATA can both be used externally at up to 6Gbit.
Thunderbolt can in theory provide a 20Gbit connection.

/And unless you're connecting carefully constructed disk arrays or SSDs on a PCIe bus, this is probably just about meaningless right now since no single disk drive is going to be able to sustain writes that fast.

//Also because of protocol overhead USB-anything is only going to operate at about half its specified speed under the best of circumstances.
 
2014-04-16 10:08:07 PM

LoneVVolf: The USB 3.0 CONTROLLER has a max throughput of 5Gbps, your keyboard wire cannot sustain that. It is also capable of maintaining speed over long distances (30m for the USB 3.0 cable), which cannot be accomplished with copper cables. Long runs of copper suffer from resistive losses and interference from outside EMR sources


RandomTux: Just to emphasize what failmitter has predictably failed to mention. The 5 Gbps speed is standard for USB 3 and can be achieved with a $5 copper cable. The distance of 30m is a neat trick that warrants $110 and then some.


Well one of you is way off...nerd fight!
 
2014-04-16 10:13:11 PM

Scrotastic Method: Well one of you is way off...nerd fight!

persephonemagazine.com
 
2014-04-16 10:17:44 PM

Scrotastic Method: LoneVVolf: The USB 3.0 CONTROLLER has a max throughput of 5Gbps, your keyboard wire cannot sustain that. It is also capable of maintaining speed over long distances (30m for the USB 3.0 cable), which cannot be accomplished with copper cables. Long runs of copper suffer from resistive losses and interference from outside EMR sources

RandomTux: Just to emphasize what failmitter has predictably failed to mention. The 5 Gbps speed is standard for USB 3 and can be achieved with a $5 copper cable. The distance of 30m is a neat trick that warrants $110 and then some.

Well one of you is way off...nerd fight!


Maybe I'm reading it wrong, but it looks like they are agreeing, no?  Doing at a distance seems to be the trick.
 
2014-04-16 10:20:23 PM

kroonermanblack: LoneVVolf: the_sidewinder: The USB 3.0 spec says that USB 3.0 cables have a max throughput of 5Gbps, so yay, a very expensive cable that lives up to the spec

The USB 3.0 CONTROLLER has a max throughput of 5Gbps, your keyboard wire cannot sustain that. It is also capable of maintaining speed over long distances (30m for the USB 3.0 cable), which cannot be accomplished with copper cables. Long runs of copper suffer from resistive losses and interference from outside EMR sources.

If the normal consumer market doesn't push enough volume to make this profitable, military contractors will pick up the slack. There is ZERO capacitive induction in fiber cable, no risk of source/device not being on a common ground, no extra RF shielding concerns when running fiber through bulkheads/firewalls...

You actually could end up with a static burst issue, if one end of the cable gets a positive voltage reference somehow, and the other gets neutral or negative (say a few hundred volts). Potential difference, even if the cable itself is nonconductive? I've never worked with fiber in a high-voltage setting, we've always used copper, and the fiber lines were isolated 'just in case'.

But this was in substation and switchgear, like 100+ KV at the low end.


Computers in general are pretty safe, though if you hit a fiber with a high enough voltage, it will indeed screw with your transmission. It has to be pretty localized though, even a few hundred volts won't do much over 30 meters of cable. Besides, if your computer is somehow dumping that much voltage onto the cable, you have much bigger problems than cable performance.

Don't have much personal experience with a substation though; wierd shiat can happen in the high-power relm.
 
2014-04-16 10:24:34 PM

Scrotastic Method: LoneVVolf: The USB 3.0 CONTROLLER has a max throughput of 5Gbps, your keyboard wire cannot sustain that. It is also capable of maintaining speed over long distances (30m for the USB 3.0 cable), which cannot be accomplished with copper cables. Long runs of copper suffer from resistive losses and interference from outside EMR sources

RandomTux: Just to emphasize what failmitter has predictably failed to mention. The 5 Gbps speed is standard for USB 3 and can be achieved with a $5 copper cable. The distance of 30m is a neat trick that warrants $110 and then some.

Well one of you is way off...nerd fight!


How do you figure, sir?  I call a point of order for this hastily called nerd off.
 
2014-04-16 10:26:08 PM

fusillade762: Corning's new optical USB 3.0 cables

The cookware company??


You need to go here:  http://www.cmog.org/
 
2014-04-16 10:35:16 PM

Altair: Scrotastic Method: LoneVVolf: The USB 3.0 CONTROLLER has a max throughput of 5Gbps, your keyboard wire cannot sustain that. It is also capable of maintaining speed over long distances (30m for the USB 3.0 cable), which cannot be accomplished with copper cables. Long runs of copper suffer from resistive losses and interference from outside EMR sources

RandomTux: Just to emphasize what failmitter has predictably failed to mention. The 5 Gbps speed is standard for USB 3 and can be achieved with a $5 copper cable. The distance of 30m is a neat trick that warrants $110 and then some.

Well one of you is way off...nerd fight!

How do you figure, sir?  I call a point of order for this hastily called nerd off.


Scrotastic did not say a single thing that is inaccurate. Keyboard wire indeed will not sustain high-speed transmission. Which is why no one uses keyboard wire (I assume he means USB keyboard cable) for USB 3 transmission as keyboards use 1 Mbps speed.

Any cable can be plugged into a USB 3 connector. USB 1 and 2 cables are electrically identical. USB 3 cable has a special connector that looks the same but isn't. It has 9 pins of which 4 upper are backwards compatible with USB1 and 2. The cables that are sold as USB3 (all of them) have 9 pins and are rated for 5Gbps. They have to in order to get the logo
upload.wikimedia.org

TLDR: Any USB3 cable displaying USB-SS logo (superspeed) should be expected to be able to deliver 5 Gbps. Of course the controller connection on the PC side (PCIe) and the actual device (a slow hard drive) limit the actual throughput
 
2014-04-16 10:44:32 PM
How would this compare with say 10Gbit or 100Gbit ethernet?

I would guess this sort of cable would be for specialized data transfer that the general public would never use. I'd imagine it wouldn't be as flexiable as copper for peripherals like a keyboard and mouse.
 
2014-04-16 10:50:22 PM

RandomTux: Just to emphasize what failmitter has predictably failed to mention. The 5 Gbps speed is standard for USB 3 and can be achieved with a $5 copper cable. The distance of 30m is a neat trick that warrants $110 and then some.


but is it compatible with existing usb 3.0 ports on slight oldish devices??
 
2014-04-16 10:53:46 PM
FTA: Price is one major reason optical cables haven't taken off with consumers, but it certainly won't deter professionals who work with massive files that are stored on external devices.

Why would non-professional consumers even need a 5GBps cable?  I guess it might be nice for a heavy photographer or videographer, but what else would you need it for?
 
2014-04-16 10:56:06 PM

rugman11: FTA: Price is one major reason optical cables haven't taken off with consumers, but it certainly won't deter professionals who work with massive files that are stored on external devices.

Why would non-professional consumers even need a 5GBps cable?  I guess it might be nice for a heavy photographer or videographer, but what else would you need it for?


high volumes of porn data transfers to an external drive


heck your tranny porn collection alone takes up most of a terabyte
 
2014-04-16 11:02:42 PM

rugman11: Why would non-professional consumers even need a 5GBps cable?  I guess it might be nice for a heavy photographer or videographer, but what else would you need it for?


Have a music collection?  Want to back it up quickly to an external drive?

Or perhaps videos.

Or backing up your Steam folder to an external drive.  Hell, my Steam folder is a few hundred GB and I don't really have all that many games.

I wonder if this cable would make the process of making a drive image a lot quicker.

It's just damn nice to have faster transfer speeds instead of waiting a hour to transfer stuff, even at standard USB 3.0 speeds.
 
2014-04-16 11:08:06 PM

Glitchwerks: It's just damn nice to have faster transfer speeds instead of waiting a hour to transfer stuff, even at standard USB 3.0 speeds


This cable doesn't go beyond standard USB 3.0 speeds
 
2014-04-16 11:11:05 PM

the_sidewinder: This cable doesn't go beyond standard USB 3.0 speeds


So it's just the beyond 30 ft advantage?  Well, darn.
 
2014-04-16 11:11:48 PM

Pokey.Clyde: Mantour: They also make fiberglass isolation, the pink foam that gets into your skin and itches for a few days.

Fiberglass what?


Insulation. Damn you, Autocorrect!
 
2014-04-16 11:33:28 PM

Glitchwerks: rugman11: Why would non-professional consumers even need a 5GBps cable?  I guess it might be nice for a heavy photographer or videographer, but what else would you need it for?

Have a music collection?  Want to back it up quickly to an external drive?

Or perhaps videos.

Or backing up your Steam folder to an external drive.  Hell, my Steam folder is a few hundred GB and I don't really have all that many games.

I wonder if this cable would make the process of making a drive image a lot quicker.

It's just damn nice to have faster transfer speeds instead of waiting a hour to transfer stuff, even at standard USB 3.0 speeds.


But you're talking about full backups of large amounts of data.  How often do you do that?  Often enough to spend $110 or $70 or even $30 on a 30 ft USB 3.0 cable vs. a $10 30 ft USB 2.0 cable from Monoprice?  It seems like they'll need to get the price down to basically the current level for USB 2.0 cables in order to get much traction in the consumer market.
 
2014-04-16 11:36:16 PM
Wake me when I can get ports installed in my brain.
 
2014-04-16 11:38:04 PM
I'll just stick to downloading, kthxbai.
www.speedtest.net
 
2014-04-16 11:55:01 PM

Baumli: I'll just stick to downloading, kthxbai.
[www.speedtest.net image 300x135]


I am sad now.
 
2014-04-17 12:02:10 AM

Baumli: I'll just stick to downloading, kthxbai.
[www.speedtest.net image 300x135]


But you live in Missouri!  Everybody point and laugh!

Yeah, I'm not laughing either.
 
2014-04-17 12:02:38 AM

Glitchwerks: I'll wait for the superior Monster Cable version.


Agreed.  I wired my whole house, electrical, cable, satellite, plumbing, and even electrical with Monster Cables.  I've never seen such clean electricity.
 
2014-04-17 12:08:40 AM

HMS_Blinkin: Glitchwerks: I'll wait for the superior Monster Cable version.

Agreed.  I wired my whole house, electrical, cable, satellite, plumbing, and even electrical with Monster Cables.  I've never seen such clean electricity.


I do a lot of photography and I use Monster Cable for the external hard drive where I store images. It makes the photos sharper and the colors are a lot more vibrant.
 
2014-04-17 12:16:38 AM

jaytkay: HMS_Blinkin: Glitchwerks: I'll wait for the superior Monster Cable version.

Agreed.  I wired my whole house, electrical, cable, satellite, plumbing, and even electrical with Monster Cables.  I've never seen such clean electricity.

I do a lot of photography and I use Monster Cable for the external hard drive where I store images. It makes the photos sharper and the colors are a lot more vibrant.


On a related note, I'm thrilled that I purchased the extended warranty when I bought my computer, camera, and cables from Best Buy.
 
2014-04-17 12:32:13 AM

rugman11: FTA: Price is one major reason optical cables haven't taken off with consumers, but it certainly won't deter professionals who work with massive files that are stored on external devices.

Why would non-professional consumers even need a 5GBps cable?  I guess it might be nice for a heavy photographer or videographer, but what else would you need it for?


porn
duh
 
2014-04-17 12:48:03 AM

namatad: rugman11: FTA: Price is one major reason optical cables haven't taken off with consumers, but it certainly won't deter professionals who work with massive files that are stored on external devices.

Why would non-professional consumers even need a 5GBps cable?  I guess it might be nice for a heavy photographer or videographer, but what else would you need it for?

porn
duh


As with the aforementioned Thunderbolt connections, it's useful in video and audio applications.

The interface I use has FireWire and usb connections, but a Thunderbolt version is coming out -- and running several channels of high resolution audio makes it a necessity.
 
2014-04-17 01:33:16 AM
media.idownloadblog.com

USB 2.0    *highfive*
 
2014-04-17 01:45:11 AM
Can any hard drive actually write at that speed?
 
2014-04-17 02:02:28 AM

Fat Man Of La Mancha: How would this compare with say 10Gbit or 100Gbit ethernet?


Gigabit Ethernet operates at 1 gigabit per second (Gbit/sec), or 125 megabytes per second (MB/sec).  10 Gigabit Ethernet operates at 10 Gbit/sec, or 1.25 Gigabytes per second (GB/sec).  100 Gigabit Ethernet operates at 100 Gbit/sec, or 12.5 GB/sec.

If you're wondering if upgrading from Gigabit Ethernet to 10 Gigabit Ethernet will make your 15 Mbps, 75 Mbps, or even 300 Mbps Internet feed faster, that would be a no.  You're not even at a third of Gigabit Ethernet.

Consumer SSDs these days top out somewhere around 500 MB/sec read/write, maybe a bit more (the Samsung Pro, one of the faster ones, does 540 MB/sec read, 450 MB/sec write).  If you have them in RAID 0, you can double that.  Hard drives top out at around 120 to 150 MB/sec read, so they can feed a Gigabit Ethernet network connection pretty well.

USB 3.0 spec maxes out at 5 Gbit/sec, or 625 MB/sec, so that's a pretty good match for an SSD, assuming that both your source and your destination are SSDs.  If you're reading from an SSD to an external HDD, you'll never use more than a fifth of USB 3.0's ability.
 
2014-04-17 02:25:29 AM

rugman11: But you're talking about full backups of large amounts of data.  How often do you do that?  Often enough to spend $110 or $70 or even $30 on a 30 ft USB 3.0 cable vs. a $10 30 ft USB 2.0 cable from Monoprice?  It seems like they'll need to get the price down to basically the current level for USB 2.0 cables in order to get much traction in the consumer market.


You missed the discussion above.

You can get a cheap, 5ft long USB 3.0 cable for $5. USB 3.0 and the 5Gbps speed is not the new thing here. If you're just doing a backup every so often to an external hard drive, get the $5 cable and put the hard drive on your computer desk while you do it.

The fancy thing about this cable is that it can provide 5Gbps speed over 30 meters (about 100 feet). Normal copper wire USB cables can't provide that 5Gbps over a cable that long.  This cable is *only* for people who want to run a 5Gbps connection over a long distance. If distance doesn't mean anything to you, there's no reason to buy this cable.

Now, who wants a 100 foot run for high-bandwidth USB cabling? I have no clue. Traditionally that's the realm of technologies like
Ethernet. As has been pointed out, 10GbpsEthernet over very long runs is no problem.
 
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