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(ESPN)   Poor starving college students will now get unlimited meals and snacks to go with their free ride to making millions in the NBA   (espn.go.com) divider line 100
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915 clicks; posted to Sports » on 16 Apr 2014 at 11:33 AM (22 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-16 10:37:38 AM
The athletes can't have outside jobs, and the vast, vast majority will never see a pro-sports paycheck.

In other words: I'm okay with this.
 
2014-04-16 10:40:52 AM
I'm trying to figure out how they aren't taxed on the free education they receive.

That's an $80,000 value over 4 years.  They need to pay on this.
 
2014-04-16 10:46:57 AM

Chris Ween: I'm trying to figure out how they aren't taxed on the free education they receive.

That's an $80,000 value over 4 years.  They need to pay on this.


Scholarships and educational stipends are legally tax-exempt, that's why.  Why do they "need to pay on this?"  Academic, ROTC, service and other scholarships are tax exempt as well.
 
2014-04-16 10:49:31 AM

factoryconnection: The athletes can't have outside jobs, and the vast, vast majority will never see a pro-sports paycheck.

In other words: I'm okay with this.


Same here.
 
2014-04-16 11:13:25 AM

Nabb1: factoryconnection: The athletes can't have outside jobs, and the vast, vast majority will never see a pro-sports paycheck.

In other words: I'm okay with this.

Same here.


Seriously. They make the schools billions.
 
2014-04-16 11:23:55 AM

ginandbacon: Nabb1: factoryconnection: The athletes can't have outside jobs, and the vast, vast majority will never see a pro-sports paycheck.

In other words: I'm okay with this.

Same here.

Seriously. They make the schools billions.


These.
 
2014-04-16 11:30:27 AM

factoryconnection: Scholarships and educational stipends


Then make a provision that they get a farking education. Too many of these "student" athletes can spell little more than their first names (and that's debatable at times too) when they leave college.
 
2014-04-16 11:31:41 AM

BKITU: ginandbacon: Nabb1: factoryconnection: The athletes can't have outside jobs, and the vast, vast majority will never see a pro-sports paycheck.

In other words: I'm okay with this.

Same here.

Seriously. They make the schools billions.

These.


Agreed.
 
2014-04-16 11:37:28 AM
So, it's just somebody getting free access to an institution of higher learning due to his/her great ability at a child's game. Seems legit. Say, how does America rate among other countries regarding colleges and universities, and intelligence of said students attending them? No connection whatsoever, I'm sure.
 
2014-04-16 11:38:29 AM
QFTA:

"I think the end result is right where it needs to be," committee chairwoman and America East assistant commissioner Mary Mulvenna said in a statement released by the governing body.

Let me translate that...

"I think we managed to stave off players unionizing this year," committee chairwoman and America East assistant commissioner Mary Mulvenna said in a statement released by the governing body.
 
2014-04-16 11:39:48 AM
Last year, there were ~60,000 varsity level college basketball players. There are ~400 players in the NBA.
 
2014-04-16 11:40:21 AM
The NCAA: bravely manning the wall separating fetid corruption from the correct serving size for cream cheese.
 
2014-04-16 11:42:04 AM

EyeballKid: So, it's just somebody getting free access to an institution of higher learning due to his/her great ability at a child's game. Seems legit. Say, how does America rate among other countries regarding colleges and universities, and intelligence of said students attending them? No connection whatsoever, I'm sure.


I'm not athletically inclined at all, but MOST scholarship athletes in college are not in the "revenue sports" because of Title IX and many of those kids are on partial scholarships, and only if the school uses Prop 48 under the NCAA laws are they not subject to the same academic requirements of non-athletic students, and many, many schools do not use Prop 48. Are there big schools who use big revenue sports to take advantage of kids who probably have no academic business being in a college setting? Absolutely. Do athletic scholarships provide otherwise college-worthy kids the financial means to attend school where they otherwise might not? Absolutely. It's fine to be disgusted with the way the kids in the big money sports are treated, but don't fool yourself into thinking that there aren't a lot of intelligent kids out there who work their butts off to get some financial help through sports, too. It is by no means a perfect system at all, but it does do a lot of good for a lot of people.
 
2014-04-16 11:42:57 AM

Dancin_In_Anson: Then make a provision that they get a farking education. Too many of these "student" athletes can spell little more than their first names (and that's debatable at times too) when they leave college.


Quantify this accusation.  You're no doubt basing it on the few rubes that stick out in draft-day interviews for the NFL and NBA, but the NCAA ostensibly already requires maintenance of academic standards.  That their enforcement is spotty and taken advantage of by a few schools (and really it is a FEW compared to the whole) is no reason to deny this benefit to scholarship awardees nationwide.

EyeballKid: So, it's just somebody getting free access to an institution of higher learning due to his/her great ability at a child's game. Seems legit. Say, how does America rate among other countries regarding colleges and universities, and intelligence of said students attending them? No connection whatsoever, I'm sure.


Children play with computers, program computers, cook food, and do myriad other things that are professions.  As it turns out, just like in those professions, there is a huge difference in the adult and child versions.  So what does that have to do with anything?  Nothing.  And how do our colleges and universities rank?  I'm going to have to guess by the massive amounts of foreign students enrolled that they're pretty f*cking good.
 
2014-04-16 11:43:29 AM
Previously, the NCAA had a bylaw allowing schools to offer bagels, fruits and nuts to athletes. But according to an interpretation, spreads like cream cheese were prohibited, according to a February report by the Los Angeles Times. The NCAA eliminated that interpretation last year.

fark THE NCAA.
 
2014-04-16 11:43:32 AM
Sadly, this is too late for that UConn kid.
 
2014-04-16 11:46:39 AM

factoryconnection: the vast, vast majority will never see a pro-sports paycheck.


Yep.  And most of those who do will be earning journeyman salaries, 10-day contracts, or go to international leagues, and have at most a 20-year career.  Even if they excelled in school, by the end of their athletic career (should they pursue it) they're not going to have much in the ways of employable skills.
 
2014-04-16 11:47:57 AM

Nabb1: EyeballKid: So, it's just somebody getting free access to an institution of higher learning due to his/her great ability at a child's game. Seems legit. Say, how does America rate among other countries regarding colleges and universities, and intelligence of said students attending them? No connection whatsoever, I'm sure.

I'm not athletically inclined at all, but MOST scholarship athletes in college are not in the "revenue sports" because of Title IX and many of those kids are on partial scholarships, and only if the school uses Prop 48 under the NCAA laws are they not subject to the same academic requirements of non-athletic students, and many, many schools do not use Prop 48. Are there big schools who use big revenue sports to take advantage of kids who probably have no academic business being in a college setting? Absolutely. Do athletic scholarships provide otherwise college-worthy kids the financial means to attend school where they otherwise might not? Absolutely. It's fine to be disgusted with the way the kids in the big money sports are treated, but don't fool yourself into thinking that there aren't a lot of intelligent kids out there who work their butts off to get some financial help through sports, too. It is by no means a perfect system at all, but it does do a lot of good for a lot of people.


Let's also point out that the "student"-athletes are so limited in number when compared to the entire populace of the university-attending population that they'd have no effect on overall results. And that a large part of the problem is that universities are all trying to be run like businesses, making profits - what do you need to do to make profits? Expand your customer base and raise prices. Sure, the people you're selling to have no use for your product and will never use it, but like those late-night infomercial peddlers, who gives a f*ck? You got their money. But hey, let's all blame the athletic kids because we failed in our athletic dreams and they haven't yet.
 
2014-04-16 11:50:48 AM
Next up, Student Athletes hording and selling their free snacks to on the black market for extra cash...
 
2014-04-16 11:51:28 AM

Arkanaut: factoryconnection: the vast, vast majority will never see a pro-sports paycheck.

Yep.  And most of those who do will be earning journeyman salaries, 10-day contracts, or go to international leagues, and have at most a 20-year career.  Even if they excelled in school, by the end of their athletic career (should they pursue it) they're not going to have much in the ways of employable skills.


There are 351 NCAA Division 1 teams and 32 NBA teams. And There are alot more NCAA kids graduating or leaving then there are NBA players retiring every year.
 
2014-04-16 11:52:50 AM

Arkanaut: factoryconnection: the vast, vast majority will never see a pro-sports paycheck.

Yep.  And most of those who do will be earning journeyman salaries, 10-day contracts, or go to international leagues, and have at most a 20-year career.  Even if they excelled in school, by the end of their athletic career (should they pursue it) they're not going to have much in the ways of employable skills.


And, in the meantime while he can't have any professional experience in his chosen field, that kid over in the art department learning music theory can take paying gigs at local clubs or even the student union if she so chooses and not jeopardize her scholarship in any way.
 
2014-04-16 11:52:58 AM

factoryconnection: And how do our colleges and universities rank?  I'm going to have to guess by the massive amounts of foreign students enrolled that they're pretty f*cking good.


In fairness, a lot of that is because our universities do a lot of recruiting overseas because those students pay way more in tuition than your regular in-state kids.
 
2014-04-16 11:52:59 AM

EyeballKid: Say, how does America rate among other countries regarding colleges and universities, and intelligence of said students attending them?


You're kidding, right? Post-secondary education is one of the last industries still dominated by the US.

\http://www.shanghairanking.com/ARWU2013.html
 
2014-04-16 11:54:33 AM

Jim from Saint Paul: Previously, the NCAA had a bylaw allowing schools to offer bagels, fruits and nuts to athletes. But according to an interpretation, spreads like cream cheese were prohibited, according to a February report by the Los Angeles Times. The NCAA eliminated that interpretation last year.

fark THE NCAA.


Don't worry someone will be in this thread to defend the NCAA because "free education!!"

/it's free like my salary is free money
 
2014-04-16 11:54:42 AM

EyeballKid: So, it's just somebody getting free access to an institution of higher learning due to his/her great ability at a child's game. Seems legit. Say, how does America rate among other countries regarding colleges and universities, and intelligence of said students attending them? No connection whatsoever, I'm sure.

i1102.photobucket.com
 
2014-04-16 11:55:44 AM

MilesTeg: Next up, Student Athletes hording and selling their free snacks to on the black market for extra cash...


It starts there. I predict top universities will start sanctioning high-end dining facilities to serve the athletes.
 
2014-04-16 12:00:14 PM

IlGreven: And, in the meantime while he can't have any professional experience in his chosen field, that kid over in the art department learning music theory can take paying gigs at local clubs or even the student union if she so chooses and not jeopardize her scholarship in any way.


So you want colleges to hire guys that got cut from the NBA but want to keep playing and have them able to play? Or colleges hiring 25-year old Euro players with a decade of international professional experience? That'll make March Madness REAL fun.
 
2014-04-16 12:02:05 PM

ChrisDe: Sadly, this is too late for that UConn kid.


Yes, but this rule change still wouldn't fix his problem.

I heard that he had unlimited food already (prob something UConn offers all resident students) but they close at 7 pm.

So unless the university adds a food court for athletes that is open 24 hours the rule change still would have resulted in him bein hungry late at night after practice.
 
2014-04-16 12:02:26 PM

IlGreven: Arkanaut: factoryconnection: the vast, vast majority will never see a pro-sports paycheck.

Yep.  And most of those who do will be earning journeyman salaries, 10-day contracts, or go to international leagues, and have at most a 20-year career.  Even if they excelled in school, by the end of their athletic career (should they pursue it) they're not going to have much in the ways of employable skills.

And, in the meantime while he can't have any professional experience in his chosen field, that kid over in the art department learning music theory can take paying gigs at local clubs or even the student union if she so chooses and not jeopardize her scholarship in any way.


If the athlete tries to do what the musician does, they lose their eligibility and their scholarship.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/28/sports/wrestler-hoping-to-inspire- th rough-song-loses-eligibility.html
 
2014-04-16 12:12:25 PM

Nabb1: factoryconnection: The athletes can't have outside jobs, and the vast, vast majority will never see a pro-sports paycheck.

In other words: I'm okay with this.

Same here.



Ditto. Another idea is letting scholarship athletes *just* do their sports for four years and then attending college tuition-free if they'd like.  Sort of like a G.I. Bill. This way after their playing days the athletes can be serious about their studies, have no major interruptions of practice/travel and a part-time job.  The school made money off them during their playing days and now the school would be able to showcase them as actually being students.  Everybody wins.
 
2014-04-16 12:14:48 PM
I imagine it's better now, but back when I was 18 I worked at an Ice Cream shop.  One of the guys that was a security guard for the shopping center was a washed out basketball player that went to either the University of Utah or Utah State for a couple of years.  He was a super great guy, etc, etc.

But he did say that if you are a poor kid from LA and go to a place like Utah for college, you are totally unprepared for lots of stuff.  When you are just a scrub, you're still wearing your letterman's jacket from high school on campus when it's cold (I've heard this from a couple of guys) because it's the only heavy jacket you have.

He told me they used to go through the trash to collect tabs from Domino's boxes because if you collected enough "dots", you could get a free pizza.  Now, these fellas got meals paid for, but there wasn't always places open when they got done with games or practices.
 
2014-04-16 12:17:39 PM

Jim from Saint Paul: Arkanaut: factoryconnection: the vast, vast majority will never see a pro-sports paycheck.

Yep.  And most of those who do will be earning journeyman salaries, 10-day contracts, or go to international leagues, and have at most a 20-year career.  Even if they excelled in school, by the end of their athletic career (should they pursue it) they're not going to have much in the ways of employable skills.

There are 351 NCAA Division 1 teams and 32 NBA teams. And There are alot more NCAA kids graduating or leaving then there are NBA players retiring every year.


I know, I was only talking about "those who do" go pro.
 
2014-04-16 12:18:13 PM
i171.photobucket.com

Thanks, NCAA.
 
2014-04-16 12:21:16 PM

Arkanaut: Jim from Saint Paul: Arkanaut: factoryconnection: the vast, vast majority will never see a pro-sports paycheck.

Yep.  And most of those who do will be earning journeyman salaries, 10-day contracts, or go to international leagues, and have at most a 20-year career.  Even if they excelled in school, by the end of their athletic career (should they pursue it) they're not going to have much in the ways of employable skills.

There are 351 NCAA Division 1 teams and 32 NBA teams. And There are alot more NCAA kids graduating or leaving then there are NBA players retiring every year.

I know, I was only talking about "those who do" go pro.


I was agreeing wiith you. :)
 
2014-04-16 12:21:35 PM
The food thing was farking ridiculous. As a very active 18-22 year old I could inhale an xtra-large pizza for dinner and need more food 3 hours later.  Now a 1/4 of that same pizza makes me feel stuffed for 12 hours.  The old plan had no accommodations for freaky high metabolisms on a 5000+ calorie a day diet.
 
2014-04-16 12:24:17 PM
Yea! Screw the student athletes!!!
//STFU subtard
 
2014-04-16 12:26:07 PM

Karma Curmudgeon: EyeballKid: Say, how does America rate among other countries regarding colleges and universities, and intelligence of said students attending them?

You're kidding, right? Post-secondary education is one of the last industries still dominated by the US.

\http://www.shanghairanking.com/ARWU2013.html


Woooo Colorado State 151-200.  Reprazent!
 
2014-04-16 12:27:53 PM
I went to a NE liberal arts school with a campus, and we had unlimited visits to the dinning halls/you could eat whatever and how much ever you wanted.  I can't fathom going to bed hungry or not being able to afford eating enough at school.  I don't even understand how you could be a student, let alone a high end student athlete with food insecurity issues.  I have a hard enough time concentrating when I'm a little hungry, I couldn't imagine writing a paper if I'm habitually starving myself to save money.

I've probably become more hippy dippy libby lib over time, and I know and recognize that my experience is one of privilege, but how is this seen as a good idea?  I realize schools are in the business to make money, but making sure your students eat some degree of food seems like a no brainer.

/In before lol ramen noodles I guess
//I used to go to any subject matter lectures and eat the crap out of the h'ordeuvres or free pizza or whatever they were giving out
///in re-reading this I sound fat
 
2014-04-16 12:35:37 PM

Slam Bradley: I went to a NE liberal arts school with a campus, and we had unlimited visits to the dinning halls/you could eat whatever and how much ever you wanted.  I can't fathom going to bed hungry or not being able to afford eating enough at school.  I don't even understand how you could be a student, let alone a high end student athlete with food insecurity issues.  I have a hard enough time concentrating when I'm a little hungry, I couldn't imagine writing a paper if I'm habitually starving myself to save money.

I've probably become more hippy dippy libby lib over time, and I know and recognize that my experience is one of privilege, but how is this seen as a good idea?  I realize schools are in the business to make money, but making sure your students eat some degree of food seems like a no brainer.

/In before lol ramen noodles I guess
//I used to go to any subject matter lectures and eat the crap out of the h'ordeuvres or free pizza or whatever they were giving out
///in re-reading this I sound fat


I don't know how other colleges handle, but most I've heard of don't even allow unlimited visits. My alma mater has plans with a cash value (called IU bucks or something). You use them in the meal halls, the C(onvenience) store, and some off campus restaurants. No all-you-can eat options available. My friends in college had it the same way.
 
2014-04-16 12:38:40 PM

Slam Bradley: I went to a NE liberal arts school with a campus, and we had unlimited visits to the dinning halls/you could eat whatever and how much ever you wanted.  I can't fathom going to bed hungry or not being able to afford eating enough at school.  I don't even understand how you could be a student, let alone a high end student athlete with food insecurity issues.  I have a hard enough time concentrating when I'm a little hungry, I couldn't imagine writing a paper if I'm habitually starving myself to save money.

I've probably become more hippy dippy libby lib over time, and I know and recognize that my experience is one of privilege, but how is this seen as a good idea?  I realize schools are in the business to make money, but making sure your students eat some degree of food seems like a no brainer.

/In before lol ramen noodles I guess
//I used to go to any subject matter lectures and eat the crap out of the h'ordeuvres or free pizza or whatever they were giving out
///in re-reading this I sound fat


They have a 3 meal plan deal. That means 1 meal for breakfast, one for lunch and one for dinner. And from my experience they aren't allowed to take any food out of the dinning hall with them. Now add in the fact that they are doing some high level physical training and that meal you ate at 6pm isn't going last until 9pm. And at that point you are on your own for food until breakfast.
 
2014-04-16 12:45:11 PM
Michelle is going to be pissed.
 
2014-04-16 12:45:37 PM

InterruptingQuirk: Last year, there were ~60,000 varsity level college basketball players. There are ~400 players in the NBA.


That's just another argument for putting more money into development/independent leagues for the NBA to poach instead of snatching the next Kwame Brown out of Our Lady Of Maravich High School.
 
2014-04-16 12:48:21 PM
College athletes starve for years.... NCAA doesnt care

College athletes start talking about unions... NCAA does something
 
2014-04-16 12:50:03 PM

rjakobi: InterruptingQuirk: Last year, there were ~60,000 varsity level college basketball players. There are ~400 players in the NBA.

That's just another argument for putting more money into development/independent leagues for the NBA to poach instead of snatching the next Kwame Brown out of Our Lady Of Maravich High School.


Law of unintended consequences is your mistress I see.
 
2014-04-16 12:51:37 PM
I guess I wrongly ASSumed that their scholarships included room and board, that would also cover a meal plan. i hate the NCAA
 
2014-04-16 12:51:40 PM
Does this include beer?
 
2014-04-16 12:51:58 PM

Wadded Beef: Nabb1: factoryconnection: The athletes can't have outside jobs, and the vast, vast majority will never see a pro-sports paycheck.

In other words: I'm okay with this.

Same here.


Ditto. Another idea is letting scholarship athletes *just* do their sports for four years and then attending college tuition-free if they'd like.  Sort of like a G.I. Bill. This way after their playing days the athletes can be serious about their studies, have no major interruptions of practice/travel and a part-time job.  The school made money off them during their playing days and now the school would be able to showcase them as actually being students.  Everybody wins.


I like this idea.

They shouldn't get money since the point of college is to, you know, get educated. But they should get room/board/etc... covered, too.
 
2014-04-16 12:52:36 PM

smerfnablin: College athletes starve for years.... NCAA doesnt care

College athletes start talking about unions... NCAA does something


I'll bet the Koch Brothers just shiat sideways.  I can't wait till they roll out the Right to Play legislation in an attempt to undermine their Union.
 
2014-04-16 12:53:05 PM
When a NCAA scholarship athlete tells you he or she is not getting enough to eat, what he or she was actually saying was, "I'm a moron."

/or he/she is lying.
 
2014-04-16 12:56:38 PM
Also...and I can't believe this isn't the case at other colleges, at least at the Citadel, all Corps Squad (athletes) get to eat in a mess of their own which and get three squares which have about 3xs the calories of a standard freshman meal.  Why the hell WOULDN'T a program want to regulate the diets of its athletes in order to optimize performance?
 
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