If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Popular Science)   Someone came up with a shiatty new way to generate electricity   (popsci.com) divider line 25
    More: Cool, electricity, Flushing, hydroelectric dams, transducers, harvests, proof of concepts  
•       •       •

2320 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Apr 2014 at 9:57 AM (19 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



25 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2014-04-16 08:16:10 AM
This sounds like it will take care of my tiny green LED needs.  It will probably be fun to unclog too.
 
2014-04-16 09:52:28 AM
Yes, just what we need - electricity grids hooked up to our terlets.

"Goddamn Taco Bell!" *zip* *squat* ZZAPP!!
 
2014-04-16 10:01:32 AM
that won't cause clogging.
 
2014-04-16 10:06:39 AM
That "free" energy is what swirls the water and makes it work. If you extract that energy you will make an already crappy low-flush toilet even crappier.

And the energy is not really free since the water was PUMPED to that location with electricity.

Dumbest. Idea. Ever.
 
2014-04-16 10:24:48 AM
So, with this and TISP from Google, we'll be set right?

/yes..I know it's old
 
2014-04-16 10:34:15 AM
Always ask yourself what that energy was being used for before you start re-purposing it.

If you can extract this energy and use it, then you should be able to lower the amount of water you need to flush to begin with.  Why not just save the energy by not pumping as much water into the toilet?  Well, the common response would be "if you do that, it won't flush as well, and will back up!".

Exactly.  So let's not use that energy to power light bulbs and cause the same farking problem.
 
2014-04-16 10:42:35 AM
24 gallons daily,

Im not saying its not a waste but I call bs on that number.
 
2014-04-16 10:48:45 AM
Yeah, 24 gallons seems like a pretty high estimate.  15 trips to the 1.6 GPF toilets we have these days?  Not even if I was sick.

We already have real hydroelectric plants to extract energy from rain.

What's with these 2-paragraph "articles" at PopSci?  Does someone get paid for that?
 
2014-04-16 10:53:45 AM

Nhojwolfe: 24 gallons daily,

Im not saying its not a waste but I call bs on that number.


Well if you have a family of four it's only 3 or 4 bathroom trips each per day so it's possible.
 
2014-04-16 10:55:58 AM

Nhojwolfe: 24 gallons daily,

Im not saying its not a waste but I call bs on that number.


Pre-1994 residential and pre-1997 commercial flush toilets in the United States typically used 3.4 US gallons (13 L) of water per flush. (wiki)  That makes up large percentage of toilets.  If most people use those, that's about 7 flushes a day, which does seem a bit high.  Now anyone on a low-flow toilet uses far less, as they're only 1.6 gallons per flush.  So unless those people have some sort of medical condition, they're definitely not using 24 gallons.

For some reason, Popular Science feels that "Good" Magazine is a reliable source for data.
 
2014-04-16 11:02:05 AM

SpectroBoy: Dumbest. Idea. Ever.


Pretty much.
Any time someone discovers some source of "free" energy, they usually just identified an area of wasted energy.

And that's at most.
 
2014-04-16 11:09:45 AM
Who wants daily brownouts?
 
2014-04-16 11:09:53 AM

Khellendros: Nhojwolfe: 24 gallons daily,

Im not saying its not a waste but I call bs on that number.

Pre-1994 residential and pre-1997 commercial flush toilets in the United States typically used 3.4 US gallons (13 L) of water per flush. (wiki)  That makes up large percentage of toilets.  If most people use those, that's about 7 flushes a day, which does seem a bit high.  Now anyone on a low-flow toilet uses far less, as they're only 1.6 gallons per flush.  So unless those people have some sort of medical condition, they're definitely not using 24 gallons.

For some reason, Popular Science feels that "Good" Magazine is a reliable source for data.


Sometimes I have to flush twice when I use the bathroom...
/makes me sound fat
 
2014-04-16 12:23:44 PM
Read the article folks.

The researchers are just focusing on converting the flowing water energy into electricity on a small scale.

It was the journalist who applied it to toilets.

This could work on something like a storm drain, or small villages that get their water source from a higher altitude damn, where high water pressures need to be controlled and lowered along the decent anyway.
 
2014-04-16 12:44:20 PM

plcow: Read the article folks.

The researchers are just focusing on converting the flowing water energy into electricity on a small scale.

It was the journalist who applied it to toilets.

This could work on something like a storm drain, or small villages that get their water source from a higher altitude damn artisan spring, where high water pressures need to be controlled and lowered along the decent anyway.


ftfm
 
2014-04-16 12:51:22 PM

plcow: plcow: Read the article folks.

The researchers are just focusing on converting the flowing water energy into electricity on a small scale.

It was the journalist who applied it to toilets.

This could work on something like a storm drain, or small villages that get their water source from a higher altitude damn artisan artesian spring, where high water pressures need to be controlled and lowered along the decent anyway.

ftfm


rfify
 
2014-04-16 01:44:00 PM

plcow: This could work on something like a storm drain, or small villages that get their water source from a higher altitude damn artisan spring, where high water pressures need to be controlled and lowered along the decent anyway.


I only get my water from artisan springs, not some lame mass-market spring.
 
2014-04-16 01:56:40 PM
Uhm, for the nay-sayers... you don't put the generator on the downside for the turds to press against it. Install it in the tank or along the fill line so it charges as the tank is filled with the water/pressure from the utility company.

Good lord we have a lot of smart dummies around here.
 
2014-04-16 02:36:53 PM

plcow: Read the article folks.

The researchers are just focusing on converting the flowing water energy into electricity on a small scale.

It was the journalist who applied it to toilets.

This could work on something like a storm drain, or small villages that get their water source from a higher altitude damn, where high water pressures need to be controlled and lowered along the decent anyway.


So they have "invented" hydroelectric power?
 
2014-04-16 02:38:36 PM

ReverendJynxed: Uhm, for the nay-sayers... you don't put the generator on the downside for the turds to press against it. Install it in the tank or along the fill line so it charges as the tank is filled with the water/pressure from the utility company.

Good lord we have a lot of smart dummies around here.


We sure do.

That energy is not free. If you add resistance to the water needed to fill the tank the water supply needs to apply more force. The scenario you describe is not free energy. It's just a really dumb way to ship power from the water plant to your toilet.
 
2014-04-16 02:55:12 PM
That is far from useful.  Now you want useful?

1.  You obviously reclaim the water and treat it.  We do that now.  But we should change what we do with the rest.
2.  There are useful chemicals to collect in urine.  Ammonia and Urea can produce hydrogen through electrolysis.  It takes very little electricity to do this, and the hydrogen in a fuel cell is worth far more electricity than it took to create it.
3.  Collect the poo for use in a bio-reactor.  Possibly add in uneaten waste food into the reactor too.  You get methane and fertilizer(which means less need for petroleum based fertilizers).  I've read of such a reactor (although it uses poo from farm animals rather than humans) that uses the methane on site to run a generator.  Seems pretty win-win.  Now why do we not do this with human poo and wasted food?

We could solve a few problems if we stopped treating our waste as a problem and start treating it as an opportunity.
 
2014-04-16 02:58:19 PM

SpectroBoy: plcow: Read the article folks.

The researchers are just focusing on converting the flowing water energy into electricity on a small scale.

It was the journalist who applied it to toilets.

This could work on something like a storm drain, or small villages that get their water source from a higher altitude damn, where high water pressures need to be controlled and lowered along the decent anyway.

So they have "invented" hydroelectric power?


A different method of it apparently.  I am giving them credit that this isn't a standard turbine or old fashioned water wheel.
 
2014-04-16 02:59:33 PM

max_pooper: plcow: plcow: Read the article folks.

The researchers are just focusing on converting the flowing water energy into electricity on a small scale.

It was the journalist who applied it to toilets.

This could work on something like a storm drain, or small villages that get their water source from a higher altitude damn artisan artesian spring, where high water pressures need to be controlled and lowered along the decent anyway.

ftfm

rfify


Friends shouldn't let friends fark and conference call.  I wonder what I was saying on the call, haha.
 
2014-04-16 09:58:38 PM

SpectroBoy: ReverendJynxed: Uhm, for the nay-sayers... you don't put the generator on the downside for the turds to press against it. Install it in the tank or along the fill line so it charges as the tank is filled with the water/pressure from the utility company.

Good lord we have a lot of smart dummies around here.

We sure do.

That energy is not free. If you add resistance to the water needed to fill the tank the water supply needs to apply more force. The scenario you describe is not free energy. It's just a really dumb way to ship power from the water plant to your toilet.


It may be bound to be a negligible amount of power because of resistance, but it's not "shipping" power.  It's maximizing efficiency, because you're flushing your toilet(or whatever) regardless of whether you take advantage of it.  The pressure from most faucets is not from pumping, but from gravity in the case of water towers(and somewhat in upright water heaters).

plcow: A different method of it apparently. I am giving them credit that this isn't a standard turbine or old fashioned water wheel.


Actually, it's the same method. Scale is what sets it apart from the others.
 
2014-04-16 11:28:19 PM

bk3k: That is far from useful.  Now you want useful?

1.  You obviously reclaim the water and treat it.  We do that now.  But we should change what we do with the rest.
2.  There are useful chemicals to collect in urine.  Ammonia and Urea can produce hydrogen through electrolysis.  It takes very little electricity to do this, and the hydrogen in a fuel cell is worth far more electricity than it took to create it.
3.  Collect the poo for use in a bio-reactor.  Possibly add in uneaten waste food into the reactor too.  You get methane and fertilizer(which means less need for petroleum based fertilizers).  I've read of such a reactor (although it uses poo from farm animals rather than humans) that uses the methane on site to run a generator.  Seems pretty win-win.  Now why do we not do this with human poo and wasted food?

We could solve a few problems if we stopped treating our waste as a problem and start treating it as an opportunity.


And then run what's left through a thermal depolymerization refinery and you got some real carbon neutral energy going there.
 
Displayed 25 of 25 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report