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(NBC News)   Mumps outbreak in Ohio now tops 200 cases. If only there was a widely available and proven safe method of preventing it from happening   (nbcnews.com ) divider line
    More: Scary, mumps, Ohio, idea  
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1308 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Apr 2014 at 9:46 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-16 08:29:13 AM  
There is. It's called I-75.

Takes you from Pittsburgh right up into I-90 which itself leads to Toronto. You never even have to be on the same side of Erie as Ohio.
 
2014-04-16 08:31:14 AM  
In Cranberry, try the wings.

thelube.com

It's a long trip to the border and I can't rightly remember what kind of viddles they have in NY.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-04-16 08:53:37 AM  

Quoting CDC:

Although the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine is very effective, protection against mumps is not complete. Two doses of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine are 88% effective at protecting against mumps; one dose is 78% effective. Outbreaks can still occur in highly vaccinated U.S. communities, particularly in close-contact settings. In recent years, outbreaks have occurred in schools, colleges, and camps.
That protection rate is a bit better than the flu vaccine, but it's not the nearly bulletproof shield some people imagine vaccines to be.
 
2014-04-16 09:17:13 AM  

ZAZ: Quoting CDC:Although the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine is very effective, protection against mumps is not complete. Two doses of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine are 88% effective at protecting against mumps; one dose is 78% effective. Outbreaks can still occur in highly vaccinated U.S. communities, particularly in close-contact settings. In recent years, outbreaks have occurred in schools, colleges, and camps.That protection rate is a bit better than the flu vaccine, but it's not the nearly bulletproof shield some people imagine vaccines to be.


Enter herd immunity, to help bump those numbers up.  Without 100% individual immunity, the best protection is to not be exposed.
 
2014-04-16 10:06:36 AM  
Well, if you have to pick between autism and the mumps, we'll line up for the mumps. I'm not anti-vaccination. I just want SAFE vaccinnations, like my friend Dr Andrew Wakefield suggests. Did you know all that mercury in those vaccines caused my child to have autism? It's totally not anything I did or genetics. It's all the vaccines. I mean, if your child has to die from a preventable disease, at least they weren't some tard with autism, right?
 
2014-04-16 10:12:38 AM  

ZAZ: Quoting CDC:Although the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine is very effective, protection against mumps is not complete. Two doses of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine are 88% effective at protecting against mumps; one dose is 78% effective. Outbreaks can still occur in highly vaccinated U.S. communities, particularly in close-contact settings. In recent years, outbreaks have occurred in schools, colleges, and camps.That protection rate is a bit better than the flu vaccine, but it's not the nearly bulletproof shield some people imagine vaccines to be.


So let me see if I can understand your point of view.  If two doses equal 88% protection and one dose equals about 78% protection from contracting the disease then there is no point in getting the shots due to a 12 and 22% chance of contracting the disease?

In that case do you choose to never eat? sleep? drive? walk? etc.??  As each action we take as a small chance of contracting diseases and or death.

Or do you perhaps attempt to mitigate the small chance of the above negative actions from happening by taking proactive measures?  Such as seatbelt, being aware of your surroundings when you walk, cleaning your food, going to the doctor for checkups even though those preventative actions have maybe a small net positive towards your over all well-being?

Now lets add a little more to this equation, if everyone is able to take on a preventative action and that puts 100% of the population at a 88% chance of preventing the contraction of a condition do you think that just maybe that severely diminishes the actual impact of the 12% chance of contracting the disease?  I think it does.

Lets take this to the next step, in a given population there are people that cannot take the action based on other conditions, to old, to young, immune system compromised.  Now lets say that out of the population this group may make up 5-10% (just grabbing numbers) can you see now why it is so important that every healthy human that can take these actions take the actions?  I hope you can, if you can't I will spell it out, the more people that can and do take the shots the more diminished the chance that the disease will actually infect that small group of people that cannot be protected and at the same time reduce the risk of the people that have tried to protect themselves from being one of the few that has a failure of the defense.

So now perhaps you can see why when idiots (many other words can be used to describe these people on the condition the word references them being extremely below average intelligence) choose to not take these preventative actions based on actual science but on smoke and mirrors it creates problems for society?

Honestly I feel that if you can link an outbreak or an infection to someone who choose to not take the action they should be penalized.  Its already happened to a degree in some cases where infants\toddlers die due to parents not giving them the shots or taking them to doctors when they are sick and the parents are charged with manslaughter or other similar charges.
 
2014-04-16 10:15:23 AM  

doglover: There is. It's called I-75.

Takes you from Pittsburgh right up into I-90 which itself leads to Toronto. You never even have to be on the same side of Erie as Ohio.

Your sense of geography is quite fascinating.  Why would you take I-75 from tOSU to get to Toronto and since when does it go through Pittsburgh?

 
2014-04-16 10:15:44 AM  

listernine: Well...


You'll get bites.
 
2014-04-16 10:31:05 AM  
Here is a great resource for people who are concerned that autism may be linked to vaccinations:

http://www.howdovaccinescauseautism.com/
 
2014-04-16 10:33:13 AM  

Caelistis: Here is a great resource for people who are concerned that autism may be linked to vaccinations:

http://www.howdovaccinescauseautism.com/


So I checked out the link you provided and let me start off by stating that I do not think vaccines can cause autism however after reviewing the material provided and looking into the in depth detailed reports hosted on that site I feel that much more confident in my stance.

Thank you for sharing and I would love to see any try a rebuttal to the material you linked to.
 
2014-04-16 10:35:18 AM  

doglover: There is. It's called I-75.

Takes you from Pittsburgh right up into I-90 which itself leads to Toronto. You never even have to be on the same side of Erie as Ohio.


I-75 doesn't go through Pittsburgh....
 
2014-04-16 10:37:07 AM  

dazed420: Caelistis: Here is a great resource for people who are concerned that autism may be linked to vaccinations:

http://www.howdovaccinescauseautism.com/

So I checked out the link you provided and let me start off by stating that I do not think vaccines can cause autism however after reviewing the material provided and looking into the in depth detailed reports hosted on that site I feel that much more confident in my stance.

Thank you for sharing and I would love to see any try a rebuttal to the material you linked to.


One presumes that, should you disagree with that site, you can also provide material and in-depth detailed reports supporting your position.
 
2014-04-16 10:38:39 AM  

listernine: Well, if you have to pick between autism and the mumps, we'll line up for the mumps. I'm not anti-vaccination. I just want SAFE vaccinnations, like my friend Dr Andrew Wakefield suggests. Did you know all that mercury in those vaccines caused my child to have autism? It's totally not anything I did or genetics. It's all the vaccines. I mean, if your child has to die from a preventable disease, at least they weren't some tard with autism, right?


Marvelous cast, there, my friend, and an excellent choice of lures... that is most certainly going to bring in the big ones.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-04-16 10:39:07 AM  
dazed420

You have failed to understand my point of view.

My point of view is that there are a lot of anti-anti-vaxxer fanatics on Fark who don't understand how vaccines work. Any time somebody gets sick they go off blaming anti-vaxxers.

Mumps outbreaks will still occur in a vaccinated population. Flu outbreaks will still occur in a vaccinated population. An outbreak of either does not prove that anybody acted contrary to mainstream medical belief.

There are diseases that can be prevented (not merely reduced) by vaccinating everybody. Polio and smallpox are the standard examples.
 
2014-04-16 10:42:44 AM  
Isn't mumps the one that can cause deafness and sterility?

// if they make it to that age, I hope those kids opt for the "Ice Floe Retirement Recreational Area" option for Dear Ol Mom & Pop
 
2014-04-16 10:43:54 AM  

Dr Dreidel: Isn't mumps the one that can cause deafness and sterility?

// if they make it to that age, I hope those kids opt for the "Ice Floe Retirement Recreational Area" option for Dear Ol Mom & Pop


Mumps in older males is a farking nightmare. Your balls come up like balloons.
 
2014-04-16 10:44:15 AM  

Bri_Bri_Gooch: doglover: There is. It's called I-75.

Takes you from Pittsburgh right up into I-90 which itself leads to Toronto. You never even have to be on the same side of Erie as Ohio.

Your sense of geography is quite fascinating.  Why would you take I-75 from tOSU to get to Toronto and since when does it go through Pittsburgh?


I-75 Columbus to Detroit, cross teh border into South Detroit (aka Windsor), get on teh 401 to Toronto.
 
2014-04-16 10:44:31 AM  
If only there was a widely available and proven safe method of preventing it from happening

abortions?
 
2014-04-16 10:51:47 AM  
Society should be vaccinated against anti-vaxxers. I volunteer to apply the dosages.

/2x 7.62x19 PbCu composite to the cranial bones
//Vaccine rights held by Messrs Mauser and A. Kalashnikov
 
2014-04-16 10:52:42 AM  

The Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves: Bri_Bri_Gooch: doglover: There is. It's called I-75.

Takes you from Pittsburgh right up into I-90 which itself leads to Toronto. You never even have to be on the same side of Erie as Ohio.

Your sense of geography is quite fascinating.  Why would you take I-75 from tOSU to get to Toronto and since when does it go through Pittsburgh?

I-75 Columbus to Detroit, cross teh border into South Detroit (aka Windsor), get on teh 401 to Toronto.


Leave Ohio because of the mumps but go to Toronto for the SARS
 
2014-04-16 10:52:44 AM  
I had mumps when I was about 6 or 7.  I do not wish that experience on anyone.

/I am vaccinated.  It just didn't take.
 
2014-04-16 10:53:37 AM  

8tReAsUrEz: Society should be vaccinated against anti-vaxxers. I volunteer to apply the dosages.

/2x 7.62x19 PbCu composite to the cranial bones
//Vaccine rights held by Messrs Mauser and A. Kalashnikov


Bullets are expensive and a craftsman claw hammer can be used over and over again - I'm just saying.
 
2014-04-16 10:54:13 AM  

doglover: Takes you from Pittsburgh right up into I-90 which itself leads to Toronto. You never even have to be on the same side of Erie as Ohio.



Toronto is on Lake Ontario.
 
2014-04-16 10:56:26 AM  

Bri_Bri_Gooch: doglover: Takes you from Pittsburgh right up into I-90 which itself leads to Toronto. You never even have to be on the same side of Erie as Ohio.


Toronto is on Lake Ontario.


Two things can be true.
 
2014-04-16 11:05:29 AM  

Tigger: 8tReAsUrEz: Society should be vaccinated against anti-vaxxers. I volunteer to apply the dosages.

/2x 7.62x19 PbCu composite to the cranial bones
//Vaccine rights held by Messrs Mauser and A. Kalashnikov

Bullets are expensive and a craftsman claw hammer can be used over and over again - I'm just saying.


Please. Medical rules being what they are, it's probably easier to manufacture single-use hammers than to sterilize the old ones.

// thanks, Obama
 
2014-04-16 11:09:14 AM  

Diogenes: ZAZ: Quoting CDC:Although the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine is very effective, protection against mumps is not complete. Two doses of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine are 88% effective at protecting against mumps; one dose is 78% effective. Outbreaks can still occur in highly vaccinated U.S. communities, particularly in close-contact settings. In recent years, outbreaks have occurred in schools, colleges, and camps.That protection rate is a bit better than the flu vaccine, but it's not the nearly bulletproof shield some people imagine vaccines to be.

Enter herd immunity, to help bump those numbers up.  Without 100% individual immunity, the best protection is to not be exposed.


Culling or vaccination that is the question? Whether 'tis nobler... ah fu*k it let them die.
 
2014-04-16 11:19:59 AM  

SordidEuphemism: listernine: Well...

You'll get bites.


cuefet.com

Approves
 
2014-04-16 11:21:32 AM  
People: Stop kissing Millicent!
 
2014-04-16 11:33:03 AM  

8tReAsUrEz: Society should be vaccinated against anti-vaxxers. I volunteer to apply the dosages.

/2x 7.62x19 PbCu composite to the cranial bones
//Vaccine rights held by Messrs Mauser and A. Kalashnikov



Don't be crazy. We just need to relocate them, to camps. Camps with special showers.
 
2014-04-16 11:36:21 AM  

The Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves: Bri_Bri_Gooch: doglover: There is. It's called I-75.

Takes you from Pittsburgh right up into I-90 which itself leads to Toronto. You never even have to be on the same side of Erie as Ohio.

Your sense of geography is quite fascinating.  Why would you take I-75 from tOSU to get to Toronto and since when does it go through Pittsburgh?

I-75 Columbus to Detroit, cross teh border into South Detroit (aka Windsor), get on teh 401 to Toronto.


I-75 doesn't go through Columbus. It goes through Dayton, Lima, Toledo, etc.
 
2014-04-16 11:36:54 AM  

The Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves: I-75 Columbus to Detroit, cross teh border into South Detroit (aka Windsor), get on teh 401 to Toronto.


I-75 goes no where near Columbus.  It's a straight shot from Toledo down through Lima, Sidney, Dayton and into Cincy.
 
2014-04-16 11:39:48 AM  

meat0918: doglover: There is. It's called I-75.

Takes you from Pittsburgh right up into I-90 which itself leads to Toronto. You never even have to be on the same side of Erie as Ohio.

I-75 doesn't go through Pittsburgh....


I-76. Whatever. It's been a long asstime since I've driven anywhere. Point is STAY OUT OF OHIO.
 
2014-04-16 11:40:44 AM  

neversubmit: Diogenes: ZAZ: Quoting CDC:Although the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine is very effective, protection against mumps is not complete. Two doses of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine are 88% effective at protecting against mumps; one dose is 78% effective. Outbreaks can still occur in highly vaccinated U.S. communities, particularly in close-contact settings. In recent years, outbreaks have occurred in schools, colleges, and camps.That protection rate is a bit better than the flu vaccine, but it's not the nearly bulletproof shield some people imagine vaccines to be.

Enter herd immunity, to help bump those numbers up.  Without 100% individual immunity, the best protection is to not be exposed.

Culling or vaccination that is the question? Whether 'tis nobler... ah fu*k it let them die.


I work with one antivaxxer that thinks the whole thing, both vaccinations and the anti-vaccine hysteria are a plot to increase human suffering, make money, and control the population.

In his mind, some vaccines work, which is why we don't have polio or smallpox or measles for the most part, however, they've been hijacked for population control issues, hence autism.
 
2014-04-16 11:47:40 AM  

doglover: meat0918: doglover: There is. It's called I-75.

Takes you from Pittsburgh right up into I-90 which itself leads to Toronto. You never even have to be on the same side of Erie as Ohio.

I-75 doesn't go through Pittsburgh....

I-76. Whatever. It's been a long asstime since I've driven anywhere. Point is STAY OUT OF OHIO.


Once again: Nowhere near Columbus.
 
2014-04-16 11:48:08 AM  

doglover: meat0918: doglover: There is. It's called I-75.

Takes you from Pittsburgh right up into I-90 which itself leads to Toronto. You never even have to be on the same side of Erie as Ohio.

I-75 doesn't go through Pittsburgh....

I-76. Whatever. It's been a long asstime since I've driven anywhere. Point is STAY OUT OF OHIO.


I can agree with that.

Last time I was there though, I ran into John Glenn at the Columbus airport.  I'd never met an astronaut.  It was so cool.

Sadly, my camera's battery had died :( :( :(
 
2014-04-16 11:48:45 AM  

meat0918: neversubmit: Diogenes: ZAZ: Quoting CDC:Although the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine is very effective, protection against mumps is not complete. Two doses of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine are 88% effective at protecting against mumps; one dose is 78% effective. Outbreaks can still occur in highly vaccinated U.S. communities, particularly in close-contact settings. In recent years, outbreaks have occurred in schools, colleges, and camps.That protection rate is a bit better than the flu vaccine, but it's not the nearly bulletproof shield some people imagine vaccines to be.

Enter herd immunity, to help bump those numbers up.  Without 100% individual immunity, the best protection is to not be exposed.

Culling or vaccination that is the question? Whether 'tis nobler... ah fu*k it let them die.

I work with one antivaxxer that thinks the whole thing, both vaccinations and the anti-vaccine hysteria are a plot to increase human suffering, make money, and control the population.

In his mind, some vaccines work, which is why we don't have polio or smallpox or measles for the most part, however, they've been hijacked for population control issues, hence autism.


Yeah well autism makes people... well at me harder to control so your coworker should rethink it.
 
2014-04-16 11:49:41 AM  

neversubmit: meat0918: neversubmit: Diogenes: ZAZ: Quoting CDC:Although the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine is very effective, protection against mumps is not complete. Two doses of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine are 88% effective at protecting against mumps; one dose is 78% effective. Outbreaks can still occur in highly vaccinated U.S. communities, particularly in close-contact settings. In recent years, outbreaks have occurred in schools, colleges, and camps.That protection rate is a bit better than the flu vaccine, but it's not the nearly bulletproof shield some people imagine vaccines to be.

Enter herd immunity, to help bump those numbers up.  Without 100% individual immunity, the best protection is to not be exposed.

Culling or vaccination that is the question? Whether 'tis nobler... ah fu*k it let them die.

I work with one antivaxxer that thinks the whole thing, both vaccinations and the anti-vaccine hysteria are a plot to increase human suffering, make money, and control the population.

In his mind, some vaccines work, which is why we don't have polio or smallpox or measles for the most part, however, they've been hijacked for population control issues, hence autism.

Yeah well autism makes people... well at me harder to control so your coworker should rethink it.


I think you vaccinated that last sentence :)
 
2014-04-16 12:01:44 PM  

meat0918: neversubmit: Diogenes: ZAZ: Quoting CDC:Although the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine is very effective, protection against mumps is not complete. Two doses of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine are 88% effective at protecting against mumps; one dose is 78% effective. Outbreaks can still occur in highly vaccinated U.S. communities, particularly in close-contact settings. In recent years, outbreaks have occurred in schools, colleges, and camps.That protection rate is a bit better than the flu vaccine, but it's not the nearly bulletproof shield some people imagine vaccines to be.

Enter herd immunity, to help bump those numbers up.  Without 100% individual immunity, the best protection is to not be exposed.

Culling or vaccination that is the question? Whether 'tis nobler... ah fu*k it let them die.

I work with one antivaxxer that thinks the whole thing, both vaccinations and the anti-vaccine hysteria are a plot to increase human suffering, make money, and control the population.

In his mind, some vaccines work, which is why we don't have polio or smallpox or measles for the most part, however, they've been hijacked for population control issues, hence autism.


I think your coworker is ample evidence that stupid people do, in fact, breed.  If it's a plot, it's a rather poor one.
 
2014-04-16 12:02:38 PM  

meat0918: neversubmit: Yeah well autism makes people... well at me harder to control so your coworker should rethink it.

I think you vaccinated vaccidently that last sentence :)

 
2014-04-16 12:07:11 PM  

meat0918: Yeah well autism makes people... well at least me harder to control so your coworker should rethink it.


I think you vaccinated that last sentence :)


I accidentally a word.
 
2014-04-16 12:13:52 PM  

Diogenes: meat0918: neversubmit: Diogenes: ZAZ: Quoting CDC:Although the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine is very effective, protection against mumps is not complete. Two doses of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine are 88% effective at protecting against mumps; one dose is 78% effective. Outbreaks can still occur in highly vaccinated U.S. communities, particularly in close-contact settings. In recent years, outbreaks have occurred in schools, colleges, and camps.That protection rate is a bit better than the flu vaccine, but it's not the nearly bulletproof shield some people imagine vaccines to be.

Enter herd immunity, to help bump those numbers up.  Without 100% individual immunity, the best protection is to not be exposed.

Culling or vaccination that is the question? Whether 'tis nobler... ah fu*k it let them die.

I work with one antivaxxer that thinks the whole thing, both vaccinations and the anti-vaccine hysteria are a plot to increase human suffering, make money, and control the population.

In his mind, some vaccines work, which is why we don't have polio or smallpox or measles for the most part, however, they've been hijacked for population control issues, hence autism.

I think your coworker is ample evidence that stupid people do, in fact, breed.  If it's a plot, it's a rather poor one.


The scary thing is, he is a brilliant engineer, but once that mind gets off of electrical schematics and mechanical drawings, bad things happen.

I think of him as a warning.
 
2014-04-16 12:19:16 PM  

listernine: Well, if you have to pick between autism and the mumps, we'll line up for the mumps. I'm not anti-vaccination. I just want SAFE vaccinnations, like my friend Dr Andrew Wakefield suggests. Did you know all that mercury in those vaccines caused my child to have autism? It's totally not anything I did or genetics. It's all the vaccines. I mean, if your child has to die from a preventable disease, at least they weren't some tard with autism, right?


Eh, 2/10. It's a bit too obvious for a place like Fark.  You need to be a bit more subtle in your approach. I do like the "safe vaccinations" talking point, that seems to be a better line of concern trolling.

To be fair, something like this might work better at Free Republic.
 
2014-04-16 12:19:31 PM  

Diogenes: meat0918: neversubmit: Diogenes: ZAZ: Quoting CDC:Although the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine is very effective, protection against mumps is not complete. Two doses of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine are 88% effective at protecting against mumps; one dose is 78% effective. Outbreaks can still occur in highly vaccinated U.S. communities, particularly in close-contact settings. In recent years, outbreaks have occurred in schools, colleges, and camps.That protection rate is a bit better than the flu vaccine, but it's not the nearly bulletproof shield some people imagine vaccines to be.

Enter herd immunity, to help bump those numbers up.  Without 100% individual immunity, the best protection is to not be exposed.

Culling or vaccination that is the question? Whether 'tis nobler... ah fu*k it let them die.

I work with one antivaxxer that thinks the whole thing, both vaccinations and the anti-vaccine hysteria are a plot to increase human suffering, make money, and control the population.

In his mind, some vaccines work, which is why we don't have polio or smallpox or measles for the most part, however, they've been hijacked for population control issues, hence autism.

I think your coworker is ample evidence that stupid people do, in fact, breed.  If it's a plot, it's a rather poor one.


If you read Unethical human experimentation in the United States you'll see a lot of stupid.
 
2014-04-16 12:21:03 PM  

meat0918: In his mind, some vaccines work, which is why we don't have polio or smallpox or measles for the most part, however, they've been hijacked for population control issues, hence autism.


Antivaxxer hysteria can be used for population control as well. Case in point: unvaccinated men coming down with mumps orchitis, often leading to sterility.
 
2014-04-16 12:42:07 PM  

doglover: meat0918: doglover: There is. It's called I-75.

Takes you from Pittsburgh right up into I-90 which itself leads to Toronto. You never even have to be on the same side of Erie as Ohio.

I-75 doesn't go through Pittsburgh....

I-76. Whatever. It's been a long asstime since I've driven anywhere. Point is STAY OUT OF OHIO.


Then stay the hell off I-90, because it goes right through OHIO.  It doesn't go anywhere near Toronto, and doesn't even connect directly with the border at any point.
 
2014-04-16 12:43:25 PM  

soporific: listernine: Well, if you have to pick between autism and the mumps, we'll line up for the mumps. I'm not anti-vaccination. I just want SAFE vaccinnations, like my friend Dr Andrew Wakefield suggests. Did you know all that mercury in those vaccines caused my child to have autism? It's totally not anything I did or genetics. It's all the vaccines. I mean, if your child has to die from a preventable disease, at least they weren't some tard with autism, right?

Eh, 2/10. It's a bit too obvious for a place like Fark.  You need to be a bit more subtle in your approach. I do like the "safe vaccinations" talking point, that seems to be a better line of concern trolling.

To be fair, something like this might work better at Free Republic.


Sorry. I truly wasn't trolling. Drew really needs to get the sarcasm tags implemented.
 
2014-04-16 01:57:48 PM  
According to one of the crunchy granola types I know on FB, apparently a whooping cough outbreak happened because someone got vaccinated for it.
 
2014-04-16 02:40:51 PM  

listernine: Well, if you have to pick between autism and the mumps, we'll line up for the mumps. I'm not anti-vaccination. I just want SAFE vaccinnations, like my friend Dr Andrew Wakefield suggests. Did you know all that mercury in those vaccines caused my child to have autism? It's totally not anything I did or genetics. It's all the vaccines. I mean, if your child has to die from a preventable disease, at least they weren't some tard with autism, right?


Too obvious.
 
2014-04-16 03:40:21 PM  

ZAZ: dazed420

You have failed to understand my point of view.

My point of view is that there are a lot of anti-anti-vaxxer fanatics on Fark who don't understand how vaccines work. Any time somebody gets sick they go off blaming anti-vaxxers.

Mumps outbreaks will still occur in a vaccinated population. Flu outbreaks will still occur in a vaccinated population. An outbreak of either does not prove that anybody acted contrary to mainstream medical belief.

There are diseases that can be prevented (not merely reduced) by vaccinating everybody. Polio and smallpox are the standard examples.


Not 193 cases on a single University campus - not a farking chance.  This is an un(der)-vaccinated population
 
2014-04-16 03:48:38 PM  

germ78: According to one of the crunchy granola types I know on FB, apparently a whooping cough outbreak happened because someone got vaccinated for it.


You promptly ignored that person, right?

I've had to ignore someone that in one breath was ranting about why should I worry about whether or not her kids are vaccinated if mine are, got herd immunity explained as well as general statistics, then without missing a beat, said "There are too many people in the world anyways."

I guess that includes her 3 kids.

They moved out into the middle of nowhere and are homeschooling now because one of their kids came home and had learned a bad word at school.
 
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