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(Montana Standard)   If your Nigerian "girlfriend" whom you met on the Internet sends you thousands of dollars in hundred-dollar bills, then asks you to wire it all right back to you to "pay medical bills," don't be surprised when the cash turns out to be counterfeit   (mtstandard.com) divider line 112
    More: Dumbass, United States one hundred-dollar bill, Butte, Nigerians, internet, medical bills, dollars, fake money, girlfriend  
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6924 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Apr 2014 at 9:04 PM (32 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-04-15 08:07:06 PM  
Dearest one, I trust this communique finds you well and I know that I am truly blessed to have your acquaintance. I must now ask of your great favor a task which will much help my situation.
 
2014-04-15 09:10:36 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2014-04-15 09:11:19 PM  
Medical bills? They seriously need to start mixing shiat up a bit. But I guess you gotta stick with the classics.
 
2014-04-15 09:11:27 PM  
I can't believe people are still falling for this stuff.  It reminds me of an 80s sitcom:

"It so crazy it just might work"
 
2014-04-15 09:11:51 PM  
I've been the target of more than one romance scam.  Thankfully, nothing damaged beyond ego (with those at least)
 
2014-04-15 09:11:58 PM  
What I want to know in all these things is why Nigeria?  What's so special about that country that causes all this.  Certainly there are poorer countries, countries that are more violent, etc.  Why does this country seem to be at the center of all these scams?
 
2014-04-15 09:12:55 PM  
I kind of like getting those e-mails because they're like a fun soap opera filled with drama and mystery. Beautiful young rich girl with a heart of gold has an uncle who died ..... Handsome prince is in trouble and needs MY help ... Poor Orphan lady doesn't know what to do with all of her millions ... It's all very exciting.
 
2014-04-15 09:16:29 PM  
I'd like to see these counterfeit bills, bet they looked real legit.
 
2014-04-15 09:16:30 PM  
I love those shaming sites like 419 eater.
 
2014-04-15 09:17:13 PM  
I wonder how the bills looked. I wonder if they were decent counterfeits or if they were horrible and should be spotted in a second by anybody who was paying attention.
 
2014-04-15 09:17:24 PM  
jennamarie1985.files.wordpress.com

/Hell yes it's hot.
 
2014-04-15 09:19:20 PM  

brandent: What I want to know in all these things is why Nigeria?  What's so special about that country that causes all this.  Certainly there are poorer countries, countries that are more violent, etc.  Why does this country seem to be at the center of all these scams?


Most aren't actually from Nigeria, despite what they claim. The theory is that by being so obviously a scam the scammer manages to weed out people who would catch on eventually and narrows the poor of potential marks down to those who are definitely idiots. By claiming to be a Nigerian prince everybody who's got a lick of common sense exits the room, leaving only the fools who are easily separated from their money, thus saving the scammer a great deal of time and effort.
 
2014-04-15 09:23:18 PM  

To The Escape Zeppelin!: brandent: What I want to know in all these things is why Nigeria?  What's so special about that country that causes all this.  Certainly there are poorer countries, countries that are more violent, etc.  Why does this country seem to be at the center of all these scams?

Most aren't actually from Nigeria, despite what they claim. The theory is that by being so obviously a scam the scammer manages to weed out people who would catch on eventually and narrows the poor of potential marks down to those who are definitely idiots. By claiming to be a Nigerian prince everybody who's got a lick of common sense exits the room, leaving only the fools who are easily separated from their money, thus saving the scammer a great deal of time and effort.


I always assumed none were from Nigeria but I've read that yes a definite subset of the scam population is already there.  But either way the questoin stands.  Why pick Nigeria?  So you're from Eastern Europe and you are planning a scam.  Someone had to be the first person to pick Nigeria.  I buy your argument that once the whole world (who aren't complete idiots) understands Nigeria is code word for scam it self perpetuates but why Nigeria to start with?
 
2014-04-15 09:23:25 PM  
I am Prince  themindiswatching and I need help with moving what is rightfully mine out of the country...
 
2014-04-15 09:24:12 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2014-04-15 09:24:25 PM  
To my wonderful Nigerian lover,

Tough sh**. You sent the money. It's mine now. Enjoy your cancer.
 
2014-04-15 09:25:22 PM  
He is a butte man, that's why the Nigerian woman new she could seduce him.
 
2014-04-15 09:25:36 PM  
"then asks you to wire it all right back to you..."

why would you wire money to yourself, subby?

why do the dumbest headlines go green?
 
2014-04-15 09:26:41 PM  
Here's the 'k' that fell off my post above.
 
2014-04-15 09:27:55 PM  
The nude ones, i meam
 
2014-04-15 09:30:19 PM  

calbert: "then asks you to wire it all right back to you..."

why would you wire money to yourself, subby?

why do the dumbest headlines go green?


I buy money orders with my funny money and get my mom to cash them. No way I'll get caught, especially if you guys don't tell my mom
 
2014-04-15 09:30:39 PM  

Pincy: I can't believe people are still falling for this stuff.  It reminds me of an 80s sitcom:

"It so crazy it just might work"


This.
 
2014-04-15 09:34:24 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-04-15 09:34:26 PM  
Also...You absolutely deserve everything that happens to you.
 
2014-04-15 09:34:59 PM  
That would buy a lot of Dental Floss in Montana.
 
2014-04-15 09:36:31 PM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: He is a butte man, that's why the Nigerian woman new she could seduce him.


icwutudidthere. +1
 
2014-04-15 09:38:30 PM  
If you don't stop and run at the word "Nigeria", you're a farking idiot.
 
2014-04-15 09:39:24 PM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: He is a butte man, that's why the Nigerian woman new she could seduce him.


img.fark.net
 
2014-04-15 09:39:59 PM  
goddammit, now you tell me.

She was so sweet too.  She promised me her heart and soul.  I"m not sure what to do with a heart and soul, but I think there's some voodoo ritual I could perform with them.
 
2014-04-15 09:39:59 PM  

brandent: To The Escape Zeppelin!: brandent: What I want to know in all these things is why Nigeria?  What's so special about that country that causes all this.  Certainly there are poorer countries, countries that are more violent, etc.  Why does this country seem to be at the center of all these scams?

Most aren't actually from Nigeria, despite what they claim. The theory is that by being so obviously a scam the scammer manages to weed out people who would catch on eventually and narrows the poor of potential marks down to those who are definitely idiots. By claiming to be a Nigerian prince everybody who's got a lick of common sense exits the room, leaving only the fools who are easily separated from their money, thus saving the scammer a great deal of time and effort.

I always assumed none were from Nigeria but I've read that yes a definite subset of the scam population is already there.  But either way the questoin stands.  Why pick Nigeria?  So you're from Eastern Europe and you are planning a scam.  Someone had to be the first person to pick Nigeria.  I buy your argument that once the whole world (who aren't complete idiots) understands Nigeria is code word for scam it self perpetuates but why Nigeria to start with?


On the off chance someone is unaware of it:  http://www.419eater.com/

I think there's a farker who has, uh, commissioned a few wooded AT-ATs.
 
2014-04-15 09:41:42 PM  

brandent: Why does this country seem to be at the center of all these scams?


Don't overthink it.  Huge population and what's the primary language in Lagos (not all of rural Nigeria, but the cities)?  English.  Weird English to a skeptical eye, but English.   There's not an insignificant number of scams from Ghana (where English is also common), but there's just a lot more Nigerians.

I'm betting that people in France or Quebec on French-language dating sites get a lot more scams from the DRC or Cameroon than Americans do.
 
2014-04-15 09:41:44 PM  
I'm curious to know what problem is being solved by mailing someone cash and then having them wire it back to you.

I mean, besides the obvious laundering.
 
2014-04-15 09:44:26 PM  

AutumnWind: I kind of like getting those e-mails because they're like a fun soap opera filled with drama and mystery. Beautiful young rich girl with a heart of gold has an uncle who died ..... Handsome prince is in trouble and needs MY help ... Poor Orphan lady doesn't know what to do with all of her millions ... It's all very exciting.


Cool. I'm not the only one who feels this way.

There's also the travel element that I like. The money from a Jordanian prince is in the Cayman Islands and his Hong Kong lawyer needs to get it from Switzerland to Prague before the Saudis catch up with him etc etc.

Places I've been to. Places I'd like to go to someday.

A globe-trotting adventure of mystery, intrigue, royalty and death.
 
2014-04-15 09:45:18 PM  
Anyone see that newsmagazine special (can't remember which one) about currency scammers? An actual Congressman was taken in by a swindle where some guys get you in a hotel room and show you this "special chemical" that removes black ink from hundred dollar bills. It's supposed to "disguise" them from customs officials, you see. They then send you a briefcase full of pieces of black construction paper as payment for some service. Astounding how greed shuts down even the most rudimentary of logic circuits in the brain.
 
2014-04-15 09:45:32 PM  

brandent: To The Escape Zeppelin!: brandent: What I want to know in all these things is why Nigeria?  What's so special about that country that causes all this.  Certainly there are poorer countries, countries that are more violent, etc.  Why does this country seem to be at the center of all these scams?

Most aren't actually from Nigeria, despite what they claim. The theory is that by being so obviously a scam the scammer manages to weed out people who would catch on eventually and narrows the poor of potential marks down to those who are definitely idiots. By claiming to be a Nigerian prince everybody who's got a lick of common sense exits the room, leaving only the fools who are easily separated from their money, thus saving the scammer a great deal of time and effort.

I always assumed none were from Nigeria but I've read that yes a definite subset of the scam population is already there.  But either way the questoin stands.  Why pick Nigeria?  So you're from Eastern Europe and you are planning a scam.  Someone had to be the first person to pick Nigeria.  I buy your argument that once the whole world (who aren't complete idiots) understands Nigeria is code word for scam it self perpetuates but why Nigeria to start with?


Actually, long before the internet was in popular usage, Nigerians operated these scams by mail and fax.  The country became notorious for it.  So much so that the Nigerian Government created a law, titled 419, that specifically forbids fraudulent activity of this nature.
Professionals in the financial business around the world have been on guard since the 1980's (around the time that 419 was enacted), to beware of anything from Nigeria.
 
2014-04-15 09:51:02 PM  

yoyopro: brandent: To The Escape Zeppelin!: brandent: What I want to know in all these things is why Nigeria?  What's so special about that country that causes all this.  Certainly there are poorer countries, countries that are more violent, etc.  Why does this country seem to be at the center of all these scams?

Most aren't actually from Nigeria, despite what they claim. The theory is that by being so obviously a scam the scammer manages to weed out people who would catch on eventually and narrows the poor of potential marks down to those who are definitely idiots. By claiming to be a Nigerian prince everybody who's got a lick of common sense exits the room, leaving only the fools who are easily separated from their money, thus saving the scammer a great deal of time and effort.

I always assumed none were from Nigeria but I've read that yes a definite subset of the scam population is already there.  But either way the questoin stands.  Why pick Nigeria?  So you're from Eastern Europe and you are planning a scam.  Someone had to be the first person to pick Nigeria.  I buy your argument that once the whole world (who aren't complete idiots) understands Nigeria is code word for scam it self perpetuates but why Nigeria to start with?

Actually, long before the internet was in popular usage, Nigerians operated these scams by mail and fax.  The country became notorious for it.  So much so that the Nigerian Government created a law, titled 419, that specifically forbids fraudulent activity of this nature.
Professionals in the financial business around the world have been on guard since the 1980's (around the time that 419 was enacted), to beware of anything from Nigeria.


Got it.  I knew there was mail fraud prior to internet/email fraud.  But why NIgeria?  Why not some other third world country?
 
2014-04-15 09:51:51 PM  
I compare this level of dumb with the people that get run over by trains because they had headphones on. There's no fixing stupid and it's only a matter of time until they fall for something. In this case it's even better because they're both stupid AND greedy.
 
2014-04-15 09:52:33 PM  

Bill_Wick's_Friend: AutumnWind: I kind of like getting those e-mails because they're like a fun soap opera filled with drama and mystery. Beautiful young rich girl with a heart of gold has an uncle who died ..... Handsome prince is in trouble and needs MY help ... Poor Orphan lady doesn't know what to do with all of her millions ... It's all very exciting.

Cool. I'm not the only one who feels this way.

There's also the travel element that I like. The money from a Jordanian prince is in the Cayman Islands and his Hong Kong lawyer needs to get it from Switzerland to Prague before the Saudis catch up with him etc etc.

Places I've been to. Places I'd like to go to someday.

A globe-trotting adventure of mystery, intrigue, royalty and death.


Yes! I thought I was alone in this. I almost look forward to seeing what they'll come up with next. Lately I've just been getting spam about a hotel hiring me to work there. It's been pretty lame. I miss the old stuff with the countries and princes and amnesia and money.
 
2014-04-15 09:55:16 PM  
Sean Combs was going to pimp up my four door focus after sending me a cashiers check for over the amount of the car.  But he needed that additional cash asap.  And the poor guy is deaf too.
 
2014-04-15 09:59:25 PM  

brandent: yoyopro: brandent: To The Escape Zeppelin!: brandent: What I want to know in all these things is why Nigeria?  What's so special about that country that causes all this.  Certainly there are poorer countries, countries that are more violent, etc.  Why does this country seem to be at the center of all these scams?

Most aren't actually from Nigeria, despite what they claim. The theory is that by being so obviously a scam the scammer manages to weed out people who would catch on eventually and narrows the poor of potential marks down to those who are definitely idiots. By claiming to be a Nigerian prince everybody who's got a lick of common sense exits the room, leaving only the fools who are easily separated from their money, thus saving the scammer a great deal of time and effort.

I always assumed none were from Nigeria but I've read that yes a definite subset of the scam population is already there.  But either way the questoin stands.  Why pick Nigeria?  So you're from Eastern Europe and you are planning a scam.  Someone had to be the first person to pick Nigeria.  I buy your argument that once the whole world (who aren't complete idiots) understands Nigeria is code word for scam it self perpetuates but why Nigeria to start with?

Actually, long before the internet was in popular usage, Nigerians operated these scams by mail and fax.  The country became notorious for it.  So much so that the Nigerian Government created a law, titled 419, that specifically forbids fraudulent activity of this nature.
Professionals in the financial business around the world have been on guard since the 1980's (around the time that 419 was enacted), to beware of anything from Nigeria.

Got it.  I knew there was mail fraud prior to internet/email fraud.  But why NIgeria?  Why not some other third world country?


IIRC, it has to do with an economic crash in Nigeria, lots of bankers became unemployed and decided to do what they do best.  Scamming people.  (ie they had inside knowledge on how to forge cashier's checks, etc...)
 
2014-04-15 10:00:23 PM  

fusillade762: I'm curious to know what problem is being solved by mailing someone cash and then having them wire it back to you.

I mean, besides the obvious laundering.



I'm guessing it wasn't all done at the same time. First, you mail $1k counterfeit, "I'm so rich I'm just giving money away, lucky you", then a couple days later "Oh, I shouldn't have done that. I have a 100k unexpected bill and I only have 99k; wire that 1k I gave you last week back to me so I can pay it. I'll make it up next week with 2k", and then bing badda boom.

They used to do it with gift cards. They'd spam job/hiring sites with 'be a secret shopper'. When you responded they would 'hire' you to rate various places and send you a handful of $5 gift cards  to 'rate your experiences' with their customer service. After you filled in the first bunch of surveys, they would mail you another handful of cards with your "paycheck" for $700.00: $100.00 for your first week, $100.00 for your second week and $500.00 to "test" Western Union's customer service by wiring $500.00 to somewhere in Canada. ('Think of it as a gift card'). After wiring the money, the check would, of course, bounce. and you'd be out $500 for $40 in gift cards that are probably going to be blanked soon anyway as bought with a stolen credit card.

They'd also do it with "reshippers": collect stolen goods mailed to YOUR house, then repost them to someone in Canada (probably including the gift cards in the above) and make a small fortune; some unscrupulous people would do it, too, but there's no honor among thieves. They'd send you your first paycheck for a couple thousand more than promised and tell you to wire the rest forward. This check bounces also. Ends the same way.
 
2014-04-15 10:02:43 PM  

Lawnchair: brandent: Why does this country seem to be at the center of all these scams?

Don't overthink it.  Huge population and what's the primary language in Lagos (not all of rural Nigeria, but the cities)?  English.  Weird English to a skeptical eye, but English.   There's not an insignificant number of scams from Ghana (where English is also common), but there's just a lot more Nigerians.


Good point! There are more English speakers in Nigeria than in the UK (4th in the world), according to Wikipedia.
 
2014-04-15 10:02:47 PM  

ongbok: I wonder how the bills looked. I wonder if they were decent counterfeits or if they were horrible and should be spotted in a second by anybody who was paying attention.


That's what I was thinking. Someone already tried passing a counterfeit of the new $100's. It was pretty damn good too, except for the blue strip. It had the watermark, the microprinting. the little strip that shows when you hold it up to the light, and the color-shifting bell in the inkwell. If only the blue strip was done right it might have worked.

I've also noticed more bills from the 70's and 80's (before the security features) popping up, in surprisingly good condition.
 
2014-04-15 10:02:53 PM  
I remember getting a scam over Yahoo Messenger long ago, where the offer was that I would receive a sum of money, and all I had to do was send back 85%, and I could keep the 15% as my part of the deal.  I demanded 20%, but was rebuffed.  The scammer blocked me.  I guess they won't negotiate on these fictitious deals.
 
2014-04-15 10:06:58 PM  

fusillade762: I'm curious to know what problem is being solved by mailing someone cash and then having them wire it back to you.

I mean, besides the obvious laundering.


I had a Nigerian mail me "money orders". I don't remember the reason he gave but it was mailed from within the US. It was ~$2000 worth of money orders from Moneygram. He wanted me to send $1000 back to him as money order after cashing the money order.

Anyways, just for a kick I go to the local CVS and ask them to check if it is a fake and how to spot it. They couldn't give a straight answer and wanted me to cash it but then asked for my ID to be in record to cash it. I didn't cash it but there is a lot of stupid stuff going around.

I bet a lot of people actually cashed those money orders and were later in trouble down the line. If you go to the bank with money order, they will take accept the money order, give you the balance on your account, let you send the money order to Nigeria and a month later tell you that those money orders were fake.
 
2014-04-15 10:07:28 PM  

Nemosomen: I remember getting a scam over Yahoo Messenger long ago, where the offer was that I would receive a sum of money, and all I had to do was send back 85%, and I could keep the 15% as my part of the deal.  I demanded 20%, but was rebuffed.  The scammer blocked me.  I guess they won't negotiate on these fictitious deals.


Sounds like a bargain.

One time I e-mailed the 419 scammer back.  I guess I laid it on too thick because he didn't reply,  It must suck to be a Nigerian prince.  Nobody believes you and I bet they send out about 100,000 e-mails for everyone who actually falls for it.
 
2014-04-15 10:09:43 PM  
 
2014-04-15 10:10:56 PM  
My 82 year old father is convinced that a "women" he met online needs money to help her settle her deceased husbands estate so she can get the 10 million dollars.  Its TOTALLY legitimate.  She assures him she loves him and will move to the states and marry him. He's even talked to her lawyer and everything!!  He's already sent the $2400 to open the accounts necessary to get the ball rolling. She just needs a little more to pay fees and taxes.  Of course he doesn't have $2400 since he's on a very fixed income and that doesn't even cover his monthly assisted living rent and medical bills (we supplement his income to the tune of $300-400/month).  So he managed to ge two fast cash loans at 300% interest and now has no way to repay them.......until the millions come rolling in of course!!

We cannot convince him that this is obvious BS.  He willfully participates in these scams.

And yes I have completely taken over his finances and had to take his computer and Internet access away from him!!  It sucks and I feel bad, but he literally can't help himself

I sincerely wish there was a hell so that people who scam the poor, sick and elderly would spend all eternity burning in it!!!
 
2014-04-15 10:12:04 PM  

miniflea: brandent: To The Escape Zeppelin!: brandent: What I want to know in all these things is why Nigeria?  What's so special about that country that causes all this.  Certainly there are poorer countries, countries that are more violent, etc.  Why does this country seem to be at the center of all these scams?

Most aren't actually from Nigeria, despite what they claim. The theory is that by being so obviously a scam the scammer manages to weed out people who would catch on eventually and narrows the poor of potential marks down to those who are definitely idiots. By claiming to be a Nigerian prince everybody who's got a lick of common sense exits the room, leaving only the fools who are easily separated from their money, thus saving the scammer a great deal of time and effort.

I always assumed none were from Nigeria but I've read that yes a definite subset of the scam population is already there.  But either way the questoin stands.  Why pick Nigeria?  So you're from Eastern Europe and you are planning a scam.  Someone had to be the first person to pick Nigeria.  I buy your argument that once the whole world (who aren't complete idiots) understands Nigeria is code word for scam it self perpetuates but why Nigeria to start with?

On the off chance someone is unaware of it:  http://www.419eater.com/

I think there's a farker who has, uh, commissioned a few wooded AT-ATs.


*raises hand* That'd be me. 4 wooden AT-ATs, a bronze AT-AT, and a wooden Stormtrooper helmet.
 
2014-04-15 10:15:51 PM  
If your Nigerian "girlfriend"...

Yeah?

...whom you met on the Internet...

uhuh

...sends you thousands of dollars in hundred-dollar bills,...

Woohoo!  Sends me money!  Keep going!

...then asks you to wire it all right back to you....

Then asks...uh...to wire it to me...double money!  Woohoo!
 
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